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White Privilege

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  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Calgary ABPosts: 3,900
    edited August 21
    nicknyr15 said:

    Everyone’s a comedian on Twitter. Absolutely ridiculous tweet. 
    I don’t understand that a person who doesn’t realize color is a bad person now…
    Not a bad person, but perhaps an ignorant one. They are proud of their heritage. Proud of who they are. If they are of different colour they want you to recognize that. To say “I don’t see colour”  is disingenuous and, quite frankly, just plain lazy. The person saying it (who is always white) means they treat everyone the same and therefore aren’t racist all the while not recognizing their own white privilege in life. 

    Recognize who they are and understand they are different. They don’t want to be seen or treated as “similar” because the inherent systemic problems will still exist. The statement allows white folks to lie to themselves that they aren’t part of the problem, simply because “they don’t see colour”.  

    If you believe it “doesn’t matter” you are sadly mistaken. It does matter. It matters as much to them as your heritage does to you. People are different and trust me in this, asking questions and learning about those differences will enrich your own life both personally and professionally. 

    I’ve only learned this in the last few years by talking to people. I was one of those white folks who once said “I don’t see colour”.  It’s an asinine statement of course.  There are words for the different races of humanity and you learn them at a pretty young age. 
    So my thought on this.  I grew up in a “ghetto” and was a mixing pot.  Color was never an issue if you were also struggling.  You were all people trying to make it.  

    The answers I see here were never in my shoes and I need to understand that and not take it heart as most people didn’t live like I did and won’t get it.

    For those that grew up like this, color wasn’t a thing.  We didn’t see color, just our struggles.  It gave us all an appreciation for each other.
    How do you know no one was in your shoes or grew up like you? You make a lot of assumptions.  Anyway, you only want to look at this through your own eyes and from your own life experience. Until you look at it through others eyes it is moot. 

    It’s kind of interesting for you to say no one here “was ever kn your shoes” and therefore you “didn’t see colour”.  Basically, you feel like no one here is placing themselves in your shoes and understanding your point of view. At the same time you aren’t putting yourself in the shoes of the minority, who are asking for you (and all white people) to see the colour. See the differences. See the struggles they have had. 

    Just being white you get more chances in life: Facts are facts. I grew up piss poor as well. I was a pain in the ass trouble
    maker. I know if I was indigenous or black I would never have gotten so many second and third chances in life. No way no how. That is my white privilege. I got all those breaks simply by being born with this skin colour. Sounds fair right? 
    Post edited by 1ThoughtKnown on
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,080
    nicknyr15 said:

    Everyone’s a comedian on Twitter. Absolutely ridiculous tweet. 
    I don’t understand that a person who doesn’t realize color is a bad person now…
    Not a bad person, but perhaps an ignorant one. They are proud of their heritage. Proud of who they are. If they are of different colour they want you to recognize that. To say “I don’t see colour”  is disingenuous and, quite frankly, just plain lazy. The person saying it (who is always white) means they treat everyone the same and therefore aren’t racist all the while not recognizing their own white privilege in life. 

    Recognize who they are and understand they are different. They don’t want to be seen or treated as “similar” because the inherent systemic problems will still exist. The statement allows white folks to lie to themselves that they aren’t part of the problem, simply because “they don’t see colour”.  

    If you believe it “doesn’t matter” you are sadly mistaken. It does matter. It matters as much to them as your heritage does to you. People are different and trust me in this, asking questions and learning about those differences will enrich your own life both personally and professionally. 

    I’ve only learned this in the last few years by talking to people. I was one of those white folks who once said “I don’t see colour”.  It’s an asinine statement of course.  There are words for the different races of humanity and you learn them at a pretty young age. 
    So my thought on this.  I grew up in a “ghetto” and was a mixing pot.  Color was never an issue if you were also struggling.  You were all people trying to make it.  

    The answers I see here were never in my shoes and I need to understand that and not take it heart as most people didn’t live like I did and won’t get it.

    For those that grew up like this, color wasn’t a thing.  We didn’t see color, just our struggles.  It gave us all an appreciation for each other.

    I think we need to decide here what we mean by "not seeing color".  
    I once lived in a high rise apartment building in the south end of San Francisco.  Knowing what kind of place S.F. is today, it may be hard to believe this, but that was basically a ghetto back then.  My building was about 80% black, 15% Asian, 5% other.  I was an "other".  I mixed fine those those folks and never got treated badly, nor treated anyone differently.  In fact, once when I was dirt poor, one week I sold some records to these black dudes living on a different floor.  They were cool, paid me some cash and gave me a handful of drugs (which a couch surfer crashing at my place took all at once and told me later it was "a trip".  Strange days.)
    Anyway, when it came to being neighbors, everyone was cool there.  So maybe that's what it means to "not see colors".
    On the other hand, the guys that bought my records were black.  Their pad had a whole different vibe than mine did and I thought that was cool.  The Asians kind of kept to themselves and had their mannerism which were somewhat unique.  I have no problem remembering the black dudes as being black and the Asians as what we then referred to  as "yellow", and me being white.  No big deal.  We were all different, but we all got along and were cool.

    So what is this "see not color" thing anywa?    Are we supposed to pretend there are no white, blacks, yellows, tans?  Let's see  what  Native American musician Link Wray had to say about all that:

    "Ice People"

    Ice people
    They're just made of ice
    They don't treat
    Their fellow man very nice
    You wear your hair long
    As Jesus did
    They'll crucify you
    You're not part of the establishment
    You stand up for your rights
    They'll call you a fool
    If you don't go to war
    You're not living by the golden rule
    Ice people
    They're just made of ice
    They don't treat
    Their fellow man very nice
    The red man lives and dies on the reservation
    And the black man just lives anywhere he can
    And the poor white man he doesn't live any where at all
    He can't say I'm red, I'm black, I'm yellow, I'm tanned
    We're all caught up together
    Like the buffalo on the plains
    We're just shooting sport for ice people
    We're just their game
    Ice people
    They're just made of ice
    They don't treat
    Their fellow man very nice

    Well, I'd say Link had no problem with seeing colors and at the same time understood well how people of different colors often have the same troubles.


    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,581
    nicknyr15 said:

    Everyone’s a comedian on Twitter. Absolutely ridiculous tweet. 
    I don’t understand that a person who doesn’t realize color is a bad person now…
    Not a bad person, but perhaps an ignorant one. They are proud of their heritage. Proud of who they are. If they are of different colour they want you to recognize that. To say “I don’t see colour”  is disingenuous and, quite frankly, just plain lazy. The person saying it (who is always white) means they treat everyone the same and therefore aren’t racist all the while not recognizing their own white privilege in life. 

    Recognize who they are and understand they are different. They don’t want to be seen or treated as “similar” because the inherent systemic problems will still exist. The statement allows white folks to lie to themselves that they aren’t part of the problem, simply because “they don’t see colour”.  

    If you believe it “doesn’t matter” you are sadly mistaken. It does matter. It matters as much to them as your heritage does to you. People are different and trust me in this, asking questions and learning about those differences will enrich your own life both personally and professionally. 

    I’ve only learned this in the last few years by talking to people. I was one of those white folks who once said “I don’t see colour”.  It’s an asinine statement of course.  There are words for the different races of humanity and you learn them at a pretty young age. 
    So my thought on this.  I grew up in a “ghetto” and was a mixing pot.  Color was never an issue if you were also struggling.  You were all people trying to make it.  

    The answers I see here were never in my shoes and I need to understand that and not take it heart as most people didn’t live like I did and won’t get it.

    For those that grew up like this, color wasn’t a thing.  We didn’t see color, just our struggles.  It gave us all an appreciation for each other.
    How do you know no one was in your shoes or grew up like you? You make a lot of assumptions.  Anyway, you only want to look at this through your own eyes and from your own life experience. Until you look at it through others eyes it is moot. 

    It’s kind of interesting for you to say no one here “was ever kn your shoes” and therefore you “didn’t see colour”.  Basically, you feel like no one here is placing themselves in your shoes and understanding your point of view. At the same time you aren’t putting yourself in the shoes of the minority, who are asking for you (and all white people) to see the colour. See the differences. See the struggles they have had. 

    Just being white you get more chances in life: Facts are facts. I grew up piss poor as well. I was a pain in the ass trouble
    maker. I know if I was indigenous or black I would never have gotten so many second and third chances in life. No way no how. That is my white privilege. I got all those breaks simply by being born with this skin colour. Sounds fair right? 
    No matter what I say will be wrong so I’ll just drop it. 
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 22,745
    nicknyr15 said:

    Everyone’s a comedian on Twitter. Absolutely ridiculous tweet. 
    I don’t understand that a person who doesn’t realize color is a bad person now…
    Not a bad person, but perhaps an ignorant one. They are proud of their heritage. Proud of who they are. If they are of different colour they want you to recognize that. To say “I don’t see colour”  is disingenuous and, quite frankly, just plain lazy. The person saying it (who is always white) means they treat everyone the same and therefore aren’t racist all the while not recognizing their own white privilege in life. 

    Recognize who they are and understand they are different. They don’t want to be seen or treated as “similar” because the inherent systemic problems will still exist. The statement allows white folks to lie to themselves that they aren’t part of the problem, simply because “they don’t see colour”.  

    If you believe it “doesn’t matter” you are sadly mistaken. It does matter. It matters as much to them as your heritage does to you. People are different and trust me in this, asking questions and learning about those differences will enrich your own life both personally and professionally. 

    I’ve only learned this in the last few years by talking to people. I was one of those white folks who once said “I don’t see colour”.  It’s an asinine statement of course.  There are words for the different races of humanity and you learn them at a pretty young age. 
    So my thought on this.  I grew up in a “ghetto” and was a mixing pot.  Color was never an issue if you were also struggling.  You were all people trying to make it.  

    The answers I see here were never in my shoes and I need to understand that and not take it heart as most people didn’t live like I did and won’t get it.

    For those that grew up like this, color wasn’t a thing.  We didn’t see color, just our struggles.  It gave us all an appreciation for each other.
    How do you know no one was in your shoes or grew up like you? You make a lot of assumptions.  Anyway, you only want to look at this through your own eyes and from your own life experience. Until you look at it through others eyes it is moot. 

    It’s kind of interesting for you to say no one here “was ever kn your shoes” and therefore you “didn’t see colour”.  Basically, you feel like no one here is placing themselves in your shoes and understanding your point of view. At the same time you aren’t putting yourself in the shoes of the minority, who are asking for you (and all white people) to see the colour. See the differences. See the struggles they have had. 

    Just being white you get more chances in life: Facts are facts. I grew up piss poor as well. I was a pain in the ass trouble
    maker. I know if I was indigenous or black I would never have gotten so many second and third chances in life. No way no how. That is my white privilege. I got all those breaks simply by being born with this skin colour. Sounds fair right? 
    No matter what I say will be wrong so I’ll just drop it. 

    Brian does pose a very good question though....
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Calgary ABPosts: 3,900
    nicknyr15 said:

    Everyone’s a comedian on Twitter. Absolutely ridiculous tweet. 
    I don’t understand that a person who doesn’t realize color is a bad person now…
    Not a bad person, but perhaps an ignorant one. They are proud of their heritage. Proud of who they are. If they are of different colour they want you to recognize that. To say “I don’t see colour”  is disingenuous and, quite frankly, just plain lazy. The person saying it (who is always white) means they treat everyone the same and therefore aren’t racist all the while not recognizing their own white privilege in life. 

    Recognize who they are and understand they are different. They don’t want to be seen or treated as “similar” because the inherent systemic problems will still exist. The statement allows white folks to lie to themselves that they aren’t part of the problem, simply because “they don’t see colour”.  

    If you believe it “doesn’t matter” you are sadly mistaken. It does matter. It matters as much to them as your heritage does to you. People are different and trust me in this, asking questions and learning about those differences will enrich your own life both personally and professionally. 

    I’ve only learned this in the last few years by talking to people. I was one of those white folks who once said “I don’t see colour”.  It’s an asinine statement of course.  There are words for the different races of humanity and you learn them at a pretty young age. 
    So my thought on this.  I grew up in a “ghetto” and was a mixing pot.  Color was never an issue if you were also struggling.  You were all people trying to make it.  

    The answers I see here were never in my shoes and I need to understand that and not take it heart as most people didn’t live like I did and won’t get it.

    For those that grew up like this, color wasn’t a thing.  We didn’t see color, just our struggles.  It gave us all an appreciation for each other.
    How do you know no one was in your shoes or grew up like you? You make a lot of assumptions.  Anyway, you only want to look at this through your own eyes and from your own life experience. Until you look at it through others eyes it is moot. 

    It’s kind of interesting for you to say no one here “was ever kn your shoes” and therefore you “didn’t see colour”.  Basically, you feel like no one here is placing themselves in your shoes and understanding your point of view. At the same time you aren’t putting yourself in the shoes of the minority, who are asking for you (and all white people) to see the colour. See the differences. See the struggles they have had. 

    Just being white you get more chances in life: Facts are facts. I grew up piss poor as well. I was a pain in the ass trouble
    maker. I know if I was indigenous or black I would never have gotten so many second and third chances in life. No way no how. That is my white privilege. I got all those breaks simply by being born with this skin colour. Sounds fair right? 
    No matter what I say will be wrong so I’ll just drop it. 
    I’m not saying your “wrong”.  I’m merely suggesting you to look at it from another point of view. The minorities want you to see their colour. As Brian’s post above indicates, that’s who they are. It is what makes them unique. Treating everyone “the same” could be seen as akin to subtle assimilation in their eyes. 
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 6,277
    nicknyr15 said:

    Everyone’s a comedian on Twitter. Absolutely ridiculous tweet. 
    I don’t understand that a person who doesn’t realize color is a bad person now…
    Not a bad person, but perhaps an ignorant one. They are proud of their heritage. Proud of who they are. If they are of different colour they want you to recognize that. To say “I don’t see colour”  is disingenuous and, quite frankly, just plain lazy. The person saying it (who is always white) means they treat everyone the same and therefore aren’t racist all the while not recognizing their own white privilege in life. 

    Recognize who they are and understand they are different. They don’t want to be seen or treated as “similar” because the inherent systemic problems will still exist. The statement allows white folks to lie to themselves that they aren’t part of the problem, simply because “they don’t see colour”.  

    If you believe it “doesn’t matter” you are sadly mistaken. It does matter. It matters as much to them as your heritage does to you. People are different and trust me in this, asking questions and learning about those differences will enrich your own life both personally and professionally. 

    I’ve only learned this in the last few years by talking to people. I was one of those white folks who once said “I don’t see colour”.  It’s an asinine statement of course.  There are words for the different races of humanity and you learn them at a pretty young age. 
    So my thought on this.  I grew up in a “ghetto” and was a mixing pot.  Color was never an issue if you were also struggling.  You were all people trying to make it.  

    The answers I see here were never in my shoes and I need to understand that and not take it heart as most people didn’t live like I did and won’t get it.

    For those that grew up like this, color wasn’t a thing.  We didn’t see color, just our struggles.  It gave us all an appreciation for each other.
    How do you know no one was in your shoes or grew up like you? You make a lot of assumptions.  Anyway, you only want to look at this through your own eyes and from your own life experience. Until you look at it through others eyes it is moot. 

    It’s kind of interesting for you to say no one here “was ever kn your shoes” and therefore you “didn’t see colour”.  Basically, you feel like no one here is placing themselves in your shoes and understanding your point of view. At the same time you aren’t putting yourself in the shoes of the minority, who are asking for you (and all white people) to see the colour. See the differences. See the struggles they have had. 

    Just being white you get more chances in life: Facts are facts. I grew up piss poor as well. I was a pain in the ass trouble
    maker. I know if I was indigenous or black I would never have gotten so many second and third chances in life. No way no how. That is my white privilege. I got all those breaks simply by being born with this skin colour. Sounds fair right? 
    No matter what I say will be wrong so I’ll just drop it. 
    This is tricky. If you’re right this time, then you’d be wrong? But if you’re wrong that makes you right? 
  • FiveBelowFiveBelow Lubbock, TXPosts: 923
    Is not playing cornerback in the NFL.
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