The Inexcusable Travesty of Mt. Everest

brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
edited May 27 in A Moving Train
Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






"Hate your job, love your stuff
If you think that's living, you are
Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
-Juliana Hatfield
***********
M.I.T.S.







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Comments

  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 6,564
    I believe its actually beyond 10 with a majority dying on the descent from  altitude sickness.
    Too many are leaving too late for the final push to the top.
    Too many are taking too long to get up there because of the overcrowding .
    Too many taking too much time at the top.
    Too many not able to get down fast enough because of the overcrowding. 

    Just remember no one is forced to be there. Not even the Sherpas of which I think only one has died this year.
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 15,524
    bodies will be left. at least they are biodegradable. once the climate has changed enough that is...

    the rest of the trash left isnt.....
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  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,177
    9 dead this week alone and they issued a record number of permits this climbing season...it's pure greed on one side, and ego's on the other side...as long as Nepal and China don,t come whining to the west to pay for the environmental damage... their mountain, their problem...
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    9 dead this week alone and they issued a record number of permits this climbing season...it's pure greed on one side, and ego's on the other side...as long as Nepal and China don,t come whining to the west to pay for the environmental damage... their mountain, their problem...
    Their mountain?  I suppose.  But it's hard for me to think of anyone "owning" something beautiful (or once was beautiful) in nature.  But then I don't think anthropocentrically.

    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,177
    What is so beautiful about a mountain full of human shit, garbage and dead humans?
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    What is so beautiful about a mountain full of human shit, garbage and dead humans?
    From up close, nothing.  From afar, plenty:

    And of the eight-thousanders, Makalu...

    ...or K2 I think are more beautiful:


    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 6,564
  • vaggar99vaggar99 San Diego USAPosts: 3,228
    edited May 27
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    ah...to be rich, adventurous and dumb.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    vaggar99 said:
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    ah...to be rich, adventurous and dumb.
    No kidding!  I can think of SO many other places I would rather go, things to do.  These are people with too much money, too much "conquer the world" style ego, and FAR too little respect for the natural world.  I would love to see China and Nepal put a ban on climbing that mountain.  Give to back to the Buddhist Monks to look up to and honor from below- like it once was.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 15,524
    brianlux said:
    vaggar99 said:
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    ah...to be rich, adventurous and dumb.
    No kidding!  I can think of SO many other places I would rather go, things to do.  These are people with too much money, too much "conquer the world" style ego, and FAR too little respect for the natural world.  I would love to see China and Nepal put a ban on climbing that mountain.  Give to back to the Buddhist Monks to look up to and honor from below- like it once was.
    important source of revenue for nepal. and the sherpas.
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • SmellymanSmellyman AsiaPosts: 3,775
    this could be in the Idiot Thread.

    Human idiocy knows no bounds.

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    mickeyrat said:
    brianlux said:
    vaggar99 said:
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    ah...to be rich, adventurous and dumb.
    No kidding!  I can think of SO many other places I would rather go, things to do.  These are people with too much money, too much "conquer the world" style ego, and FAR too little respect for the natural world.  I would love to see China and Nepal put a ban on climbing that mountain.  Give to back to the Buddhist Monks to look up to and honor from below- like it once was.
    important source of revenue for nepal. and the sherpas.
    Absolutely, Mickey. It's very cool and I'm all for it, if done right.  Everest might help some of the locals but it's more about lining the pockets of rulers while desecrating a sacred Buddhist site.

    Helping those people the right way is not easy.  It takes a lot of guts, a strong knowledge and understanding of the people, places, and the politics of these areas, a good strong sense of diplomacy, and a certain amount of luck. 

    I've mentioned this book here before but it's an excellent book written by someone who has done it right, Steve Swenson's Karakoram; Climbing Through the Kashmir Conflict:





    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    Smellyman said:
    this could be in the Idiot Thread.

    Human idiocy knows no bounds.

    Good call!
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • benjsbenjs Toronto, ONPosts: 7,807
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    Brian, have you visited Nepal? Extreme levels of corruption and poverty likely make it difficult for the Nepali government to shift their priorities, as frustrating and defeatist as it is to say that. They need this income. They lack skills, resources, education, and most importantly, quality leadership. I’m not saying this kind of negligence should be permitted, but I’m saying that it’s unrealistic to expect change from within. This is a country that desperately needs leadership help.
    '05 - TO, '06 - TO 1, '08 - NYC 1 & 2, '09 - TO, Chi 1 & 2, '10 - Buffalo, NYC 1 & 2, '11 - TO 1 & 2, Hamilton, '13 - Buffalo, Brooklyn 1 & 2, '15 - Global Citizen, '16 - TO 1 & 2, Chi 2

    EV
    Toronto Film Festival 9/11/2007, '08 - Toronto 1 & 2, '09 - Albany 1, '11 - Chicago 1
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 6,564
    brianlux said:
    Smellyman said:
    this could be in the Idiot Thread.

    Human idiocy knows no bounds.

    Good call!
    As a rock climber and occasional mtn climber I'm going to dispute this.
    However,  what is currently happening on Everest is a conflagration of multiple things. Kind of like a perfect storm...
    Too many permits issued by both China and Nepal.
    Too small a window of good weather in which to make summit attempts.
    Too many "high-altitude " tourists.
    Too many expidition companies trying to make all their money in one short season 
    Etc etc

    Please keep in mind that this is not necessarily an annual or daily occurrence. Two days before the viral images of the high altitude traffic jam of more than 200 climbers trying to summit was taken, 14 climbers summited.
    This is also not a new thing. During the 2012 climbing season  on May 19, 2012 247 climbers summited in one day. Don't  think anyone died that day.

  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 17,035
    benjs said:
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    Brian, have you visited Nepal? Extreme levels of corruption and poverty likely make it difficult for the Nepali government to shift their priorities, as frustrating and defeatist as it is to say that. They need this income. They lack skills, resources, education, and most importantly, quality leadership. I’m not saying this kind of negligence should be permitted, but I’m saying that it’s unrealistic to expect change from within. This is a country that desperately needs leadership help.
    Sounds familiar.
    Make Nepal great again!

    This is an example of greed and ignorance...sad for those left behind.
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 21,643
    I have no pitty for the people who have died there they all know the dangers of the climb ! The government should institute a ban for at least 5 yrs and only allow climbers who will clean up the mess period ..you wanna climb clean the mountain for a season and then you get to climb again your name gets on a list ...
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 6,564
    I have no pitty for the people who have died there they all know the dangers of the climb ! The government should institute a ban for at least 5 yrs and only allow climbers who will clean up the mess period ..you wanna climb clean the mountain for a season and then you get to climb again your name gets on a list ...
    I feel I need to come on here and defend mountaineering. There is a concerted effort to clean up and keep the mountain clean. Leaving the bodies is based on tradition and safety issues. 

  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 17,035
    Isn't it a safety issue that people who are not experienced enough are allowed to climb/get permits?
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 6,564
    Isn't it a safety issue that people who are not experienced enough are allowed to climb/get permits?
    It is a major safety issue.
    They are often referred to  as "high-altitude tourists"

    I for one would love to make an attempt on Everest.
    I have mountaineering experience,  I do well at high altitude,  I understand the ins and outs, rights and wrongs of mountaineering. But have yet to do anything close to an 8,000er (mountain above 25,000 ft above sea level). I don't  have enough experience to make such an attempt without risking my life and that of others on the mountain. Wish others did the same.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    benjs said:
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    Brian, have you visited Nepal? Extreme levels of corruption and poverty likely make it difficult for the Nepali government to shift their priorities, as frustrating and defeatist as it is to say that. They need this income. They lack skills, resources, education, and most importantly, quality leadership. I’m not saying this kind of negligence should be permitted, but I’m saying that it’s unrealistic to expect change from within. This is a country that desperately needs leadership help.
    I have not, Ben, although I would love to see the Himalayas.   Yes, I agree that tourist money is important in Nepal but my contention is that too much of it is siphoned off my criminals and people in power.  There has to be a way to help the average poor out there without desecrating and ruining a Natural Beauty ("should be preserved like a monument to nature" -Neil Young).
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    brianlux said:
    Smellyman said:
    this could be in the Idiot Thread.

    Human idiocy knows no bounds.

    Good call!
    As a rock climber and occasional mtn climber I'm going to dispute this.
    However,  what is currently happening on Everest is a conflagration of multiple things. Kind of like a perfect storm...
    Too many permits issued by both China and Nepal.
    Too small a window of good weather in which to make summit attempts.
    Too many "high-altitude " tourists.
    Too many expidition companies trying to make all their money in one short season 
    Etc etc

    Please keep in mind that this is not necessarily an annual or daily occurrence. Two days before the viral images of the high altitude traffic jam of more than 200 climbers trying to summit was taken, 14 climbers summited.
    This is also not a new thing. During the 2012 climbing season  on May 19, 2012 247 climbers summited in one day. Don't  think anyone died that day.

    That's for certain.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    I have no pitty for the people who have died there they all know the dangers of the climb ! The government should institute a ban for at least 5 yrs and only allow climbers who will clean up the mess period ..you wanna climb clean the mountain for a season and then you get to climb again your name gets on a list ...
    I feel I need to come on here and defend mountaineering. There is a concerted effort to clean up and keep the mountain clean. Leaving the bodies is based on tradition and safety issues. 

    I by no means intended here to disparage mountaineering.  I am totally fascinated by it, have done some lesser climbs myself in the past and mountaineering literature is one of my favorite reading genres. What I will criticize harshly is the kind of egocentric, anthropocentric disregard of nature by hordes of well-to-do folks who just want that big Everest notch on their hiking stick as well as the irresponsible people in power in those countries that do not enforce reasonable  limits to the assault of places like Everest.  There are plenty of more adventurous and more beautiful climbs in the world and if mountaineers are concerned about helping poor people in poor countries, they would climb those peaks where tourism is less frequent.  Again, I would refer anyone interested in this to the Steve Swenson book I mentioned above.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • benjsbenjs Toronto, ONPosts: 7,807
    brianlux said:
    benjs said:
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    Brian, have you visited Nepal? Extreme levels of corruption and poverty likely make it difficult for the Nepali government to shift their priorities, as frustrating and defeatist as it is to say that. They need this income. They lack skills, resources, education, and most importantly, quality leadership. I’m not saying this kind of negligence should be permitted, but I’m saying that it’s unrealistic to expect change from within. This is a country that desperately needs leadership help.
    I have not, Ben, although I would love to see the Himalayas.   Yes, I agree that tourist money is important in Nepal but my contention is that too much of it is siphoned off my criminals and people in power.  There has to be a way to help the average poor out there without desecrating and ruining a Natural Beauty ("should be preserved like a monument to nature" -Neil Young).
    I hope I’m not coming across as being in disagreement, because I’m not. I’m just saying that the path to betterment of the nation isn’t coming from their leadership, and I fear that unless someone outside of Nepal finds a way to inject change in ways that sustain the nation, the changes won’t come from within.

    I know this is a discussion board, but I find it frustrating sometimes when we talk about things that should happen with full knowledge of the fact that they won’t without a significant catalyst for change. How do we channel this great dialogue and make it into tangible change? That’s the question that ultimately I wish more of us were focused on. We debate the topics, and agree or disagree, we come to a point where we need to mobilize - and are not seemingly able to do that in this modern world. That reality needs to shift if we’re to keep this planet that we really don’t deserve. From my perspective, I truly don’t care anymore. I will do my best within my means for the planet, with the acceptance that the world will likely be returned to better species than ours - I just hope we don’t do them the irreparable harm we’ve done to each other or Earth.
    '05 - TO, '06 - TO 1, '08 - NYC 1 & 2, '09 - TO, Chi 1 & 2, '10 - Buffalo, NYC 1 & 2, '11 - TO 1 & 2, Hamilton, '13 - Buffalo, Brooklyn 1 & 2, '15 - Global Citizen, '16 - TO 1 & 2, Chi 2

    EV
    Toronto Film Festival 9/11/2007, '08 - Toronto 1 & 2, '09 - Albany 1, '11 - Chicago 1
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,297
    benjs said:
    brianlux said:
    benjs said:
    brianlux said:
    Twenty two years after the publication of John Krakauer's Into Thin Air, the telling of the several death on Mt. Everest due, at least in part, to overcrowding on the mountain, Everest is still plagued by lines of Disneyland like tourism.  This is a travesty!  The death toll on Everest this month so far is now 10.






    Brian, have you visited Nepal? Extreme levels of corruption and poverty likely make it difficult for the Nepali government to shift their priorities, as frustrating and defeatist as it is to say that. They need this income. They lack skills, resources, education, and most importantly, quality leadership. I’m not saying this kind of negligence should be permitted, but I’m saying that it’s unrealistic to expect change from within. This is a country that desperately needs leadership help.
    I have not, Ben, although I would love to see the Himalayas.   Yes, I agree that tourist money is important in Nepal but my contention is that too much of it is siphoned off my criminals and people in power.  There has to be a way to help the average poor out there without desecrating and ruining a Natural Beauty ("should be preserved like a monument to nature" -Neil Young).
    I hope I’m not coming across as being in disagreement, because I’m not. I’m just saying that the path to betterment of the nation isn’t coming from their leadership, and I fear that unless someone outside of Nepal finds a way to inject change in ways that sustain the nation, the changes won’t come from within.

    I know this is a discussion board, but I find it frustrating sometimes when we talk about things that should happen with full knowledge of the fact that they won’t without a significant catalyst for change. How do we channel this great dialogue and make it into tangible change? That’s the question that ultimately I wish more of us were focused on. We debate the topics, and agree or disagree, we come to a point where we need to mobilize - and are not seemingly able to do that in this modern world. That reality needs to shift if we’re to keep this planet that we really don’t deserve. From my perspective, I truly don’t care anymore. I will do my best within my means for the planet, with the acceptance that the world will likely be returned to better species than ours - I just hope we don’t do them the irreparable harm we’ve done to each other or Earth.
    Ben, you have a way of making points that are both poignant, thought provoking and mildly troubling- but I mean that in a good way.  Yes, we desperately need to find ways to move forward from those things that are harmful to the planet and unjust for many people. 

    I've written letters, called my representatives, attended state legislative meeting, even organized a gathering on the steps of city hall to raise awareness of global warming and yet little seems to have changed.  With the current administration, things even seem worse.  But I don't see quitting or giving up as a solution.  To yet again (at the risk of sounding cheer leading) bring up a good example of the power of action, I'll mention Greta Thunberg.  She is a fine example of how one person can be a catalyst for change.  We can't all be catalysts, but we can stand behind those who are, lend our voices to a good cause, donate what time and money we can to change, and most of, don't give up on hope.  It's the only thing that makes sense. 

    I think we've already done irreparable harm to the planet in this era, maybe even this epoch.  But time is on earth's side.  Given the vast amounts of time left for this planet, I think it is likely it will find it's balance again as nature has in the past, even after cataclysmic damage inflicted on it by major volcanic activity, large meteor strikes, etc.  But it is too bad we humans will probably cause our own demise prematurely.

    So how do we do this in regards to the topic at hand?  First thing I would suggest is that if anyone here is into big mountain climbing, I would look into joining an expedition group that specifically strives to be responsible on the mountain.  I'm not in the game myself, but if I were, I would seek out an organization that is aware of the crooked politics in these mountain regions and who do what they can to see that expedition dollars go to those in need where possible.  Again, this is what Steven Swenson did during his heyday as an expedition leader.  I would look for an organization that emphasizes the "pack it in, pack it out" motto as well as safety first, strict adherence to following turn around time (which the otherwise great mountain climber Rob Hall did not do, costing his and his client their lives), and who are not focused on over-crowed treks like the one seen in the photo at the top of the page. 
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,615
    I don't even understand why so many climbers even want to do it at this point. Look at that ridiculous lineup to reach the peak. If I were them, that sight would turn me off of the desire to reach the peak at all. When you see that many people lined up to reach that goal you yourself are waiting to achieve ... I dunno, I feel like that would cause it to lose all meaning, psychologically or emotionally.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • bbiggsbbiggs Posts: 3,646
    PJ_Soul said:
    I don't even understand why so many climbers even want to do it at this point. Look at that ridiculous lineup to reach the peak. If I were them, that sight would turn me off of the desire to reach the peak at all. When you see that many people lined up to reach that goal you yourself are waiting to achieve ... I dunno, I feel like that would cause it to lose all meaning, psychologically or emotionally.
    I totally agree with this.  It looks like a line to get on a rollercoaster; not to reach the highest peak on planet Earth.  That, to me, would take away from the experience. This over-crowding is sad.  I was not aware that this was taking place.  
  • Jason PJason P Posts: 18,026
    There is better gear and more access to the wild then there was 20 years ago.  As a climber, I have to imagine Everest is one of the biggest goals and achievements one could have.  Once you get there it may be your only chance ever.   The line is long in the picture buy that is a really a small amount of people (if you are sampling from the entire world population) that may be held up by one or two people that are experiencing severe altitude issues.

    One issue is the people.  Another issue is everyone is dead-set focus on reaching the top.  Main issue is mother nature.  People know there is danger and death lurking, but from my experience you never actually believe it is yourself that will end up as a casualty.  Always some other poor schmoe ... usually takes a close call to slap some sense into you.

    I've never aspired to climb as I've tried it and don't experience any rush or thrill from it.  I have an immense respect for gravity.  But I've gone through a hard-core backpacking phase and I know the mentality of pushing and pushing until sometimes you are in a pickle that your not prepared for.  Sometimes success is realizing when to retreat.
  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 19,879
    PJ_Soul said:
    I don't even understand why so many climbers even want to do it at this point. Look at that ridiculous lineup to reach the peak. If I were them, that sight would turn me off of the desire to reach the peak at all. When you see that many people lined up to reach that goal you yourself are waiting to achieve ... I dunno, I feel like that would cause it to lose all meaning, psychologically or emotionally.
    Sounds a lot like what I've heard about PJ merch lines :whistle:
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 5,440
    Before that picture i always thought Everest was a very lonely quiet climb :lol:   

    That looks really dangerous.  Im guessing that time is of the essence with these things and that line has to both slow people down and make them rush.  
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