Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez

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Comments

  • joseph33joseph33 NashvillePosts: 893
    I'm not a fan.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 24,225
    mace1229 said:
    I love her new green deal.  Love it.  The cost to actually go through with it is a bit robust though.

    Do I think college can be free?  Sure can.  Why a university costs 25K and up to attend is mind boggling.
    That actually isn’t that outrageous when you consider states pay schools 10-20k per student  in funding.  It could be cut back some, but I don’t see how to make it free without a significant increase in taxes.
    A college is going to have better facilities and equipment and wider range of options. But a public school has some other expenses too.

    The biggest waste in college funding is how many classes professors take (other than coaches salaries). Many profs only teach 2 classes each semester. Literally 2 classes on M,W, F and that’s it in terms of teaching. They may have other obligations that make the school look better, like conducting research or a book deal or something. But those don’t really do a lot for kids. To me it’s kind of a joke to have a full time instructor literally teach 6 hours a week and the rest of their job is making the school look good.
    Have teachers teach 20-25 hours a week will still allow plenty of time for grade Nd and prepping, etc. and put the other things as a side project, you could cut staff by more than half. School may then only cost 15-20k, and that seems reasonable. Not cheap I know, but on par with what k-12 education costs.
    Don't get me started on the subsidizing of colleges...
  • bootlegger10bootlegger10 Posts: 13,126
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 17,826
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
  • cincybearcatcincybearcat Posts: 14,197
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Did you walk uphill both ways too?
    hippiemom = goodness
  • static111static111 Posts: 959
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 17,826
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Did you walk uphill both ways too?
    Perhaps, but don't you think the tuition costs are outrageous today?  It's a combination of facilities (sports and students), reduced state funding, fair number of students with zero or low tuition (of which I'm supportive), and a number of professors who teach few classes.  I think people would be surprised at how few classes tenured professors teach.  They are expected to publish.  If we want to lower the cost curve, the expense line has to change.  
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 17,826
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
  • static111static111 Posts: 959
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
    All Federal.   I was at least smart enough to not get myself into private debt.  The only debt that my wife and I have is student loans.  It's ridiculous. Always pay on time etc.  sometimes it seems insurmountable, but luckily we are finally on the downhill slope. So unless something goes horrifically wrong we are finally both on our way to seeing a lower balance each month.  And when we have extra we throw it at them. The sad thing is when I went to university I was covered with scholarships and grants.  It was upon learning a trade at the local CC that I took out most of my loans, while working three jobs! And this was one of the most affordable schools in one of the poorest states in the nation.  Luckily I did get set on a decent career in the welding industry...of course Covid isn't helping with that right now.
  • PoncierPoncier Posts: 11,190
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Did you walk uphill both ways too?
    Barefoot in the snow!
    This weekend we rock Portland
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 17,826
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
    All Federal.   I was at least smart enough to not get myself into private debt.  The only debt that my wife and I have is student loans.  It's ridiculous. Always pay on time etc.  sometimes it seems insurmountable, but luckily we are finally on the downhill slope. So unless something goes horrifically wrong we are finally both on our way to seeing a lower balance each month.  And when we have extra we throw it at them. The sad thing is when I went to university I was covered with scholarships and grants.  It was upon learning a trade at the local CC that I took out most of my loans, while working three jobs! And this was one of the most affordable schools in one of the poorest states in the nation.  Luckily I did get set on a decent career in the welding industry...of course Covid isn't helping with that right now.
    I'm a bit older than you, but my first year I funded with a Stafford Loan.  I think those are extinct now.  But I recall the rate being very low, sub 4%.  Are your public loans higher than that?
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 24,225
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
    All Federal.   I was at least smart enough to not get myself into private debt.  The only debt that my wife and I have is student loans.  It's ridiculous. Always pay on time etc.  sometimes it seems insurmountable, but luckily we are finally on the downhill slope. So unless something goes horrifically wrong we are finally both on our way to seeing a lower balance each month.  And when we have extra we throw it at them. The sad thing is when I went to university I was covered with scholarships and grants.  It was upon learning a trade at the local CC that I took out most of my loans, while working three jobs! And this was one of the most affordable schools in one of the poorest states in the nation.  Luckily I did get set on a decent career in the welding industry...of course Covid isn't helping with that right now.
    I'm a bit older than you, but my first year I funded with a Stafford Loan.  I think those are extinct now.  But I recall the rate being very low, sub 4%.  Are your public loans higher than that?
    My GF has 6 figures of debt.  Private and public.  Horrible rates.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 17,826
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
    All Federal.   I was at least smart enough to not get myself into private debt.  The only debt that my wife and I have is student loans.  It's ridiculous. Always pay on time etc.  sometimes it seems insurmountable, but luckily we are finally on the downhill slope. So unless something goes horrifically wrong we are finally both on our way to seeing a lower balance each month.  And when we have extra we throw it at them. The sad thing is when I went to university I was covered with scholarships and grants.  It was upon learning a trade at the local CC that I took out most of my loans, while working three jobs! And this was one of the most affordable schools in one of the poorest states in the nation.  Luckily I did get set on a decent career in the welding industry...of course Covid isn't helping with that right now.
    I'm a bit older than you, but my first year I funded with a Stafford Loan.  I think those are extinct now.  But I recall the rate being very low, sub 4%.  Are your public loans higher than that?
    My GF has 6 figures of debt.  Private and public.  Horrible rates.
    Yes, private is going to be higher since there are no subsidies, so it's based on your credit (or that of your co-signer).  

    Anyone know the rate of fed loans?  I agree with Static that it should, at worst, the Fed Funds rate (discount rate).  That's a quarter point today.  A year ago it was 2.5%.  So it's dirt cheap.   
  • cincybearcatcincybearcat Posts: 14,197
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
    All Federal.   I was at least smart enough to not get myself into private debt.  The only debt that my wife and I have is student loans.  It's ridiculous. Always pay on time etc.  sometimes it seems insurmountable, but luckily we are finally on the downhill slope. So unless something goes horrifically wrong we are finally both on our way to seeing a lower balance each month.  And when we have extra we throw it at them. The sad thing is when I went to university I was covered with scholarships and grants.  It was upon learning a trade at the local CC that I took out most of my loans, while working three jobs! And this was one of the most affordable schools in one of the poorest states in the nation.  Luckily I did get set on a decent career in the welding industry...of course Covid isn't helping with that right now.
    I'm a bit older than you, but my first year I funded with a Stafford Loan.  I think those are extinct now.  But I recall the rate being very low, sub 4%.  Are your public loans higher than that?
    My GF has 6 figures of debt.  Private and public.  Horrible rates.
    Well don't marry her
    hippiemom = goodness
  • OnWis97OnWis97 St. Paul, MNPosts: 2,570
    edited August 4
    I was a lucky bastard...only child of upper-middle class (non-materialistic) parents.  I actually had the college fund that some kids grow up thinking they have.  My wife, not so much.  Grew up in poverty.  I was taken aback by her loans, which to me it seemed like may as well have been market rate. The only advantage (other than the fact that no bank would have loaned her family money) over a bank was that she didn't have to start paying until after graduation from grad school. Fifteen years later, we wrote the biggest check of our lives to pay it off because the long-run savings was so immense.  
    We made it work because 1) I had no student debt, 2) we both have professional masters degrees (nothing hugely lucrative, but no philosophy-major struggles) and 3) we have no kids and are not big spenders. But four-year-only grads on average don't make a lot of money and the cost of it all is ridiculous. I think there's a lot of value to the experience but if you grow up without a lot of money, you're really forced into being utilitarian about it and not going in if you don't know exactly what you're going to do with it. 
    At the same time, it's good that we're backing off on idealizing the four-year experience.  We needed more balance and a more clear delineation of post-secondary options (and less villification of some).  But I hope it all (the cost, the over-compensation on lionizing college, conservative policy) doesn't all end up keeping low-income people from being able to go the traditional college route if that's what suits them.
    Post edited by OnWis97 on
    1995 Milwaukee
    1998 Alpine, Alpine
    2003 Albany, Boston, Boston, Boston
    2004 Boston, Boston
    2006 Hartford, St. Paul (Petty), St. Paul (Petty)
    2011 Alpine, Alpine
    2013 Wrigley
    2014 St. Paul
    2016 Fenway, Fenway, Wrigley, Wrigley
    2018 Missoula, Wrigley, Wrigley
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 7,801
    Poncier said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Did you walk uphill both ways too?
    Barefoot in the snow!
    Feet?!
    You had feet?!
    Wow lucky
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 24,225
    edited August 4
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
    All Federal.   I was at least smart enough to not get myself into private debt.  The only debt that my wife and I have is student loans.  It's ridiculous. Always pay on time etc.  sometimes it seems insurmountable, but luckily we are finally on the downhill slope. So unless something goes horrifically wrong we are finally both on our way to seeing a lower balance each month.  And when we have extra we throw it at them. The sad thing is when I went to university I was covered with scholarships and grants.  It was upon learning a trade at the local CC that I took out most of my loans, while working three jobs! And this was one of the most affordable schools in one of the poorest states in the nation.  Luckily I did get set on a decent career in the welding industry...of course Covid isn't helping with that right now.
    I'm a bit older than you, but my first year I funded with a Stafford Loan.  I think those are extinct now.  But I recall the rate being very low, sub 4%.  Are your public loans higher than that?
    My GF has 6 figures of debt.  Private and public.  Horrible rates.
    Well don't marry her
    This is a main reason why we are not.  It's not something I joke about either...

    EDIT: I DONT joke about.
    Post edited by tempo_n_groove on
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 17,826
    Poncier said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Did you walk uphill both ways too?
    Barefoot in the snow!
    Feet?!
    You had feet?!
    Wow lucky
    Ha.. Luxury... There were a 150 of us living in a cardboard box in the middle of the road.  

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ue7wM0QC5LE
  • static111static111 Posts: 959
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
    All Federal.   I was at least smart enough to not get myself into private debt.  The only debt that my wife and I have is student loans.  It's ridiculous. Always pay on time etc.  sometimes it seems insurmountable, but luckily we are finally on the downhill slope. So unless something goes horrifically wrong we are finally both on our way to seeing a lower balance each month.  And when we have extra we throw it at them. The sad thing is when I went to university I was covered with scholarships and grants.  It was upon learning a trade at the local CC that I took out most of my loans, while working three jobs! And this was one of the most affordable schools in one of the poorest states in the nation.  Luckily I did get set on a decent career in the welding industry...of course Covid isn't helping with that right now.
    I'm a bit older than you, but my first year I funded with a Stafford Loan.  I think those are extinct now.  But I recall the rate being very low, sub 4%.  Are your public loans higher than that?
    The one that is left is 6.5%.  I had no idea what the hell apr even meant at the time since I never learned about financial trickery or money rules because I came up from a long line of poor people.  I literally thought it meant you borrowed X and paid back X+6.5%  what a fool I was.   Now I know all about that stuff. We are currently a cash only household and will likely continue as one unless we ever get to a place we feel comfortable taking out a loan on a house.  In the current economy saving up a couple hundred thousand to pay cash on a house seems like a pipe dream
  • static111static111 Posts: 959
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Riddle me this.  If the government sets the rate for student loans, why can’t they set it at zero?  That would make the cost much easier to bear for those that have to borrow.  It’s not like the government doesn’t have a history of giving 0 interest loans to big business because of the return they get in the long run.  Imagine the return you could get from people that aren’t overburdened by student loan debt.  I personally have paid more than I originally borrowed and am now on the downhill slope, though I still owe a considerable amount. If I had 0 interest the loan would have likely been paid off years ago and I could be thinking about home ownership and other things of that nature by now...
    I don't know why the Felps program can't be zero, honestly.  It probably could be and should be.  They shouldn't be dischargeable in bankruptcy, so might as well ease the burden.  Are your loans all federal or do you have private in there too?  Many people don't qualify for the felps program but still can't afford tuition.  
    All Federal.   I was at least smart enough to not get myself into private debt.  The only debt that my wife and I have is student loans.  It's ridiculous. Always pay on time etc.  sometimes it seems insurmountable, but luckily we are finally on the downhill slope. So unless something goes horrifically wrong we are finally both on our way to seeing a lower balance each month.  And when we have extra we throw it at them. The sad thing is when I went to university I was covered with scholarships and grants.  It was upon learning a trade at the local CC that I took out most of my loans, while working three jobs! And this was one of the most affordable schools in one of the poorest states in the nation.  Luckily I did get set on a decent career in the welding industry...of course Covid isn't helping with that right now.
    I'm a bit older than you, but my first year I funded with a Stafford Loan.  I think those are extinct now.  But I recall the rate being very low, sub 4%.  Are your public loans higher than that?
    The one that is left is 6.5%.  I had no idea what the hell apr even meant at the time since I never learned about financial trickery or money rules because I came up from a long line of poor people.  I literally thought it meant you borrowed X and paid back X+6.5%  what a fool I was.   Now I know all about that stuff. We are currently a cash only household and will likely continue as one unless we ever get to a place we feel comfortable taking out a loan on a house.  In the current economy saving up a couple hundred thousand to pay cash on a house seems like a pipe dream
    Current rates are much lower I just decided to retrain and take out loans at a terrible time.   
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 4,776
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    College costs and facilities are ridiculous.  College should be two to three years max unless it is a field of public safety/health (health, engineering, etc...).  
    Yes they are.  When I went to school,  it was spartan living.  Now the amenities are crazy,  as schools compete for students with those amenities.  There are a ton of factors that have driven the cost of tuition so far ahead of inflation,  but this is certainly one of them. 
    Did you walk uphill both ways too?
    Perhaps, but don't you think the tuition costs are outrageous today?  It's a combination of facilities (sports and students), reduced state funding, fair number of students with zero or low tuition (of which I'm supportive), and a number of professors who teach few classes.  I think people would be surprised at how few classes tenured professors teach.  They are expected to publish.  If we want to lower the cost curve, the expense line has to change.  
    As I mentioned in a previous post, I was shocked when I learned that. It isn’t uncommon for a tenure teacher to have 2 classes a semester (that  is when they aren’t on sabbatical and teaching 0 classes). And publishing is a huge deal. The college/university probably spends as much on salary as they do business expenses with publishing. It’s really crazy. Not all professors need to write books. Especially when the only ones who buys them are their students because the prof made it a required reading just to get book sales into the double digits.
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 4,776
    I actually had a prof that assigned his book as the main text one time. And I had an the 4 edition when the current one was 5th. After the first paper he told me he was not going to accept any more assignments unless I referenced the current edition.
    The only difference was a few pictures changed and some formatting. I wanted to reply “well if your book from last year is so wrong why would I trust this one?” But I didnt.
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