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America's Gun Violence

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  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 9,039
  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 28,725
    I guess everyone should have a 108’ yacht when they feel threatened? Wayne LaPue is a much bigger pussy than I originally thought. All that bluster and rhetoric and he probably doesn’t even go to the range. Keep sending those dollars. Suckers.

    https://apple.news/A0WoUDagvRmeVN1zRwHZ5Ew
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

    "If you're looking down on someone, it better be to extend them a hand to lift them up."

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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,235
    I guess everyone should have a 108’ yacht when they feel threatened? Wayne LaPue is a much bigger pussy than I originally thought. All that bluster and rhetoric and he probably doesn’t even go to the range. Keep sending those dollars. Suckers.

    https://apple.news/A0WoUDagvRmeVN1zRwHZ5Ew
    I wonder if the people that threatened death upon him would shoot him.  Isn't that irony?
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 9,039
    I guess everyone should have a 108’ yacht when they feel threatened? Wayne LaPue is a much bigger pussy than I originally thought. All that bluster and rhetoric and he probably doesn’t even go to the range. Keep sending those dollars. Suckers.

    https://apple.news/A0WoUDagvRmeVN1zRwHZ5Ew
    I wonder if the people that threatened death upon him would shoot him.  Isn't that irony?
    I would think so.
    Live by the gun die by the gun
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 9,039
    Local doctor and two children are among 5 killed in South Carolina mass shooting, authorities say. http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/cnn_topstories/~3/oQLN6Xt1-ec/index.html
  • Lerxst1992Lerxst1992 Posts: 4,103
    Local doctor and two children are among 5 killed in South Carolina mass shooting, authorities say. http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/cnn_topstories/~3/oQLN6Xt1-ec/index.html

    Must be Morning in Murica again.
  • bootlegger10bootlegger10 Posts: 13,632
    What an embarrassment the U.S.'s love of guns is. 
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 22,490
    posting here too...

    Biden making new moves on guns, including naming ATF boss
    By ALEXANDRA JAFFE, AAMER MADHANI and MICHAEL BALSAMO
    5 mins ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, in his first gun control measures since taking office, announced a half-dozen executive actions Thursday aimed at addressing a proliferation of gun violence across the nation that he called an “epidemic and an international embarrassment."

    “It is actually a public health crisis,” Biden said during remarks at the White House.

    Greeting the families of gun violence victims and activists, he assured them: “We’re absolutely determined to make change."

    His Thursday announcement delivers on a pledge Biden made last month to take what he termed immediate “common-sense steps” to address gun violence, after a series of mass shootings drew renewed attention to the issue. His announcement came the same day as yet another shooting, this one in South Carolina, where five people were killed.

    But Thursday's announcement underscores the limitations of Biden's executive power to act on guns. They include moves to tighten regulations on homemade guns and provide more resources for gun-violence prevention, but fall far short of the sweeping gun-control agenda Biden laid out on the campaign trail.

    Indeed, the White House has repeatedly emphasized the need for legislative action to tackle the issue. But while the House passed a background-check bill last month, gun control measures face slim prospects in an evenly divided Senate, where Republicans remain near-unified against most proposals.

    Biden is tightening regulations of buyers of “ghost guns” — homemade firearms that usually are assembled from parts and milled with a metal-cutting machine and often lack serial numbers used to trace them. It’s legal to build a gun in a home or a workshop and there is no federal requirement for a background check. The goal is to “help stop the proliferation of these firearms,” according to the White House.

    The Justice Department will issue a proposed rule aimed at reining in ghost guns within 30 days, though details of the rule weren't immediately issued.

    A second proposed rule, expected within 60 days, will tighten regulations on pistol-stabilizing braces, like the one used by the Boulder, Colorado, shooter in a rampage last month that left 10 dead. The rule will designate pistols used with stabilizing braces as short-barreled rifles, which require a federal license to own and are subject to a more thorough application process and a $200 tax.

    The department also is publishing model legislation within 60 days that is intended to make it easier for states to adopt their own “red flag” laws. Such laws allow for individuals to petition a court to allow the police to confiscate weapons from a person deemed to be a danger to themselves or others.

    The department also will begin to provide more data on firearms trafficking, starting with a new comprehensive report on the issue. The administration says that hasn’t been done in more than two decades.

    Biden is also nominating David Chipman, a former federal agent and adviser at the gun control group Giffords, to be director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

    The Biden administration will also make investments in community violence intervention programs, which are aimed at reducing gun violence in urban communities, across five federal agencies.

    Officials said the executive actions were “initial steps” completed during Garland’s first weeks on the job and more may be coming.

    The ATF is currently run by an acting director, Regina Lombardo. Gun-control advocates have emphasized the significance of this position in enforcing gun laws, and Chipman is certain to win praise from this group. During his time as a senior policy adviser with Giffords, he spent considerable effort pushing for greater regulation and enforcement on ghost guns, changes to the background check system and measures to reduce the trafficking of illegal firearms.

    Chipman spent 25 years as an agent at the ATF, where he worked on stopping a trafficking ring that sent illegal firearms from Virginia to New York, and served on the ATF’s SWAT team. Chipman is a gun owner.

    He is an explosives expert and was among the team involved in investigating the Oklahoma City bombing and the first World Trade Center bombing. He also was involved in investigating a series of church bombings in Alabama in the 1990s. He retired from the ATF in 2012.

    The White House fact sheet said Chipman has worked “to advance common-sense gun safety laws.”

    During his campaign, Biden promised to prioritize new gun control measures as president, including enacting universal background check legislation, banning online sales of firearms and the manufacture and sale of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. But gun-control advocates have said that while they were heartened by signs from the White House that they took the issue seriously, they've been disappointed by the lack of early action.

    With the announcement of the new measures, however, advocates lauded Biden's first moves to combat gun violence.

    “Each of these executive actions will start to address the epidemic of gun violence that has raged throughout the pandemic, and begin to make good on President Biden’s promise to be the strongest gun safety president in history,” said John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety.

    Feinblatt in particular praised the move to regulate ghost guns, which he said “will undoubtedly save countless lives,” and lauded Chipman as an “invaluable point person” in the fight against illegal gun trafficking. He also said the group is looking forward to continuing to work with the Biden administration on further gun control measures, but it's unclear what next moves the White House, or lawmakers on Capitol Hill, will be able to take.

    Biden himself expressed uncertainty late last month when asked if he had the political capital to pass new gun control proposals, telling reporters, “I haven’t done any counting yet."

    For years, federal officials have been sounding the alarm about an increasing black market for homemade, military-style semi-automatic rifles and handguns. Ghost guns have increasingly turned up at crime scenes and in recent years have been turning up more and more when federal agents are purchasing guns in undercover operations from gang members and other criminals.

    It is hard to say how many are circulating on the streets, in part because in many cases police departments don’t even contact the federal government about the guns because they can’t be traced.

    Some states, like California, have enacted laws in recent years to require serial numbers be stamped on ghost guns.

    The critical component in building an untraceable gun is what is known as the lower receiver, a part typically made of metal or polymer. An unfinished receiver — sometimes referred to as an “80-percent receiver” — can be legally bought online with no serial numbers or other markings on it, no license required.

    A gunman who killed his wife and four others in Northern California in 2017 had been prohibited from owning firearms, but he built his own to skirt the court order before his rampage. And in 2019, a teenager used a homemade handgun to fatally shoot two classmates and wound three others at a school in suburban Los Angeles.

    ___

    Associated Press writer Lisa Marie Pane in Boise, Idaho, contributed to this report.


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
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    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 25,070
    mickeyrat said:
    posting here too...

    Biden making new moves on guns, including naming ATF boss
    By ALEXANDRA JAFFE, AAMER MADHANI and MICHAEL BALSAMO
    5 mins ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, in his first gun control measures since taking office, announced a half-dozen executive actions Thursday aimed at addressing a proliferation of gun violence across the nation that he called an “epidemic and an international embarrassment."

    “It is actually a public health crisis,” Biden said during remarks at the White House.

    Greeting the families of gun violence victims and activists, he assured them: “We’re absolutely determined to make change."

    His Thursday announcement delivers on a pledge Biden made last month to take what he termed immediate “common-sense steps” to address gun violence, after a series of mass shootings drew renewed attention to the issue. His announcement came the same day as yet another shooting, this one in South Carolina, where five people were killed.

    But Thursday's announcement underscores the limitations of Biden's executive power to act on guns. They include moves to tighten regulations on homemade guns and provide more resources for gun-violence prevention, but fall far short of the sweeping gun-control agenda Biden laid out on the campaign trail.

    Indeed, the White House has repeatedly emphasized the need for legislative action to tackle the issue. But while the House passed a background-check bill last month, gun control measures face slim prospects in an evenly divided Senate, where Republicans remain near-unified against most proposals.

    Biden is tightening regulations of buyers of “ghost guns” — homemade firearms that usually are assembled from parts and milled with a metal-cutting machine and often lack serial numbers used to trace them. It’s legal to build a gun in a home or a workshop and there is no federal requirement for a background check. The goal is to “help stop the proliferation of these firearms,” according to the White House.

    The Justice Department will issue a proposed rule aimed at reining in ghost guns within 30 days, though details of the rule weren't immediately issued.

    A second proposed rule, expected within 60 days, will tighten regulations on pistol-stabilizing braces, like the one used by the Boulder, Colorado, shooter in a rampage last month that left 10 dead. The rule will designate pistols used with stabilizing braces as short-barreled rifles, which require a federal license to own and are subject to a more thorough application process and a $200 tax.

    The department also is publishing model legislation within 60 days that is intended to make it easier for states to adopt their own “red flag” laws. Such laws allow for individuals to petition a court to allow the police to confiscate weapons from a person deemed to be a danger to themselves or others.

    The department also will begin to provide more data on firearms trafficking, starting with a new comprehensive report on the issue. The administration says that hasn’t been done in more than two decades.

    Biden is also nominating David Chipman, a former federal agent and adviser at the gun control group Giffords, to be director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

    The Biden administration will also make investments in community violence intervention programs, which are aimed at reducing gun violence in urban communities, across five federal agencies.

    Officials said the executive actions were “initial steps” completed during Garland’s first weeks on the job and more may be coming.

    The ATF is currently run by an acting director, Regina Lombardo. Gun-control advocates have emphasized the significance of this position in enforcing gun laws, and Chipman is certain to win praise from this group. During his time as a senior policy adviser with Giffords, he spent considerable effort pushing for greater regulation and enforcement on ghost guns, changes to the background check system and measures to reduce the trafficking of illegal firearms.

    Chipman spent 25 years as an agent at the ATF, where he worked on stopping a trafficking ring that sent illegal firearms from Virginia to New York, and served on the ATF’s SWAT team. Chipman is a gun owner.

    He is an explosives expert and was among the team involved in investigating the Oklahoma City bombing and the first World Trade Center bombing. He also was involved in investigating a series of church bombings in Alabama in the 1990s. He retired from the ATF in 2012.

    The White House fact sheet said Chipman has worked “to advance common-sense gun safety laws.”

    During his campaign, Biden promised to prioritize new gun control measures as president, including enacting universal background check legislation, banning online sales of firearms and the manufacture and sale of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. But gun-control advocates have said that while they were heartened by signs from the White House that they took the issue seriously, they've been disappointed by the lack of early action.

    With the announcement of the new measures, however, advocates lauded Biden's first moves to combat gun violence.

    “Each of these executive actions will start to address the epidemic of gun violence that has raged throughout the pandemic, and begin to make good on President Biden’s promise to be the strongest gun safety president in history,” said John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety.

    Feinblatt in particular praised the move to regulate ghost guns, which he said “will undoubtedly save countless lives,” and lauded Chipman as an “invaluable point person” in the fight against illegal gun trafficking. He also said the group is looking forward to continuing to work with the Biden administration on further gun control measures, but it's unclear what next moves the White House, or lawmakers on Capitol Hill, will be able to take.

    Biden himself expressed uncertainty late last month when asked if he had the political capital to pass new gun control proposals, telling reporters, “I haven’t done any counting yet."

    For years, federal officials have been sounding the alarm about an increasing black market for homemade, military-style semi-automatic rifles and handguns. Ghost guns have increasingly turned up at crime scenes and in recent years have been turning up more and more when federal agents are purchasing guns in undercover operations from gang members and other criminals.

    It is hard to say how many are circulating on the streets, in part because in many cases police departments don’t even contact the federal government about the guns because they can’t be traced.

    Some states, like California, have enacted laws in recent years to require serial numbers be stamped on ghost guns.

    The critical component in building an untraceable gun is what is known as the lower receiver, a part typically made of metal or polymer. An unfinished receiver — sometimes referred to as an “80-percent receiver” — can be legally bought online with no serial numbers or other markings on it, no license required.

    A gunman who killed his wife and four others in Northern California in 2017 had been prohibited from owning firearms, but he built his own to skirt the court order before his rampage. And in 2019, a teenager used a homemade handgun to fatally shoot two classmates and wound three others at a school in suburban Los Angeles.

    ___

    Associated Press writer Lisa Marie Pane in Boise, Idaho, contributed to this report.


    Good not let the 2nd amendment freaks heads explode! 
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,235
    mickeyrat said:
    posting here too...

    Biden making new moves on guns, including naming ATF boss
    By ALEXANDRA JAFFE, AAMER MADHANI and MICHAEL BALSAMO
    5 mins ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, in his first gun control measures since taking office, announced a half-dozen executive actions Thursday aimed at addressing a proliferation of gun violence across the nation that he called an “epidemic and an international embarrassment."

    “It is actually a public health crisis,” Biden said during remarks at the White House.

    Greeting the families of gun violence victims and activists, he assured them: “We’re absolutely determined to make change."

    His Thursday announcement delivers on a pledge Biden made last month to take what he termed immediate “common-sense steps” to address gun violence, after a series of mass shootings drew renewed attention to the issue. His announcement came the same day as yet another shooting, this one in South Carolina, where five people were killed.

    But Thursday's announcement underscores the limitations of Biden's executive power to act on guns. They include moves to tighten regulations on homemade guns and provide more resources for gun-violence prevention, but fall far short of the sweeping gun-control agenda Biden laid out on the campaign trail.

    Indeed, the White House has repeatedly emphasized the need for legislative action to tackle the issue. But while the House passed a background-check bill last month, gun control measures face slim prospects in an evenly divided Senate, where Republicans remain near-unified against most proposals.

    Biden is tightening regulations of buyers of “ghost guns” — homemade firearms that usually are assembled from parts and milled with a metal-cutting machine and often lack serial numbers used to trace them. It’s legal to build a gun in a home or a workshop and there is no federal requirement for a background check. The goal is to “help stop the proliferation of these firearms,” according to the White House.

    The Justice Department will issue a proposed rule aimed at reining in ghost guns within 30 days, though details of the rule weren't immediately issued.

    A second proposed rule, expected within 60 days, will tighten regulations on pistol-stabilizing braces, like the one used by the Boulder, Colorado, shooter in a rampage last month that left 10 dead. The rule will designate pistols used with stabilizing braces as short-barreled rifles, which require a federal license to own and are subject to a more thorough application process and a $200 tax.

    The department also is publishing model legislation within 60 days that is intended to make it easier for states to adopt their own “red flag” laws. Such laws allow for individuals to petition a court to allow the police to confiscate weapons from a person deemed to be a danger to themselves or others.

    The department also will begin to provide more data on firearms trafficking, starting with a new comprehensive report on the issue. The administration says that hasn’t been done in more than two decades.

    Biden is also nominating David Chipman, a former federal agent and adviser at the gun control group Giffords, to be director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

    The Biden administration will also make investments in community violence intervention programs, which are aimed at reducing gun violence in urban communities, across five federal agencies.

    Officials said the executive actions were “initial steps” completed during Garland’s first weeks on the job and more may be coming.

    The ATF is currently run by an acting director, Regina Lombardo. Gun-control advocates have emphasized the significance of this position in enforcing gun laws, and Chipman is certain to win praise from this group. During his time as a senior policy adviser with Giffords, he spent considerable effort pushing for greater regulation and enforcement on ghost guns, changes to the background check system and measures to reduce the trafficking of illegal firearms.

    Chipman spent 25 years as an agent at the ATF, where he worked on stopping a trafficking ring that sent illegal firearms from Virginia to New York, and served on the ATF’s SWAT team. Chipman is a gun owner.

    He is an explosives expert and was among the team involved in investigating the Oklahoma City bombing and the first World Trade Center bombing. He also was involved in investigating a series of church bombings in Alabama in the 1990s. He retired from the ATF in 2012.

    The White House fact sheet said Chipman has worked “to advance common-sense gun safety laws.”

    During his campaign, Biden promised to prioritize new gun control measures as president, including enacting universal background check legislation, banning online sales of firearms and the manufacture and sale of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. But gun-control advocates have said that while they were heartened by signs from the White House that they took the issue seriously, they've been disappointed by the lack of early action.

    With the announcement of the new measures, however, advocates lauded Biden's first moves to combat gun violence.

    “Each of these executive actions will start to address the epidemic of gun violence that has raged throughout the pandemic, and begin to make good on President Biden’s promise to be the strongest gun safety president in history,” said John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety.

    Feinblatt in particular praised the move to regulate ghost guns, which he said “will undoubtedly save countless lives,” and lauded Chipman as an “invaluable point person” in the fight against illegal gun trafficking. He also said the group is looking forward to continuing to work with the Biden administration on further gun control measures, but it's unclear what next moves the White House, or lawmakers on Capitol Hill, will be able to take.

    Biden himself expressed uncertainty late last month when asked if he had the political capital to pass new gun control proposals, telling reporters, “I haven’t done any counting yet."

    For years, federal officials have been sounding the alarm about an increasing black market for homemade, military-style semi-automatic rifles and handguns. Ghost guns have increasingly turned up at crime scenes and in recent years have been turning up more and more when federal agents are purchasing guns in undercover operations from gang members and other criminals.

    It is hard to say how many are circulating on the streets, in part because in many cases police departments don’t even contact the federal government about the guns because they can’t be traced.

    Some states, like California, have enacted laws in recent years to require serial numbers be stamped on ghost guns.

    The critical component in building an untraceable gun is what is known as the lower receiver, a part typically made of metal or polymer. An unfinished receiver — sometimes referred to as an “80-percent receiver” — can be legally bought online with no serial numbers or other markings on it, no license required.

    A gunman who killed his wife and four others in Northern California in 2017 had been prohibited from owning firearms, but he built his own to skirt the court order before his rampage. And in 2019, a teenager used a homemade handgun to fatally shoot two classmates and wound three others at a school in suburban Los Angeles.

    ___

    Associated Press writer Lisa Marie Pane in Boise, Idaho, contributed to this report.


    Good not let the 2nd amendment freaks heads explode! 
    There is literally nothing in this that will prevent further shootings though, I'll admit to that.

    Nothing really changes but the Red Flag law which I'm on the fence about but should be used for good.
  • nicknyr15nicknyr15 Posts: 4,689
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
  • gvn2fly1421gvn2fly1421 Posts: 935
    nicknyr15 said:
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
    I know I see most things differently than most in here, but I have always believed in stricter gun policies.

    I was sitting in a barber shop several years back, and this guy walks in with a gun and big brown holster and looked like he climbed off his horse and walked in to the Wild West Saloon.  I will never understand the need to carry a gun to get your hair cut.  
  • Ledbetterman10Ledbetterman10 Posts: 15,034
    nicknyr15 said:
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
    Hmm...that seems strange. What were the circumstances that caused this?

    As for the rest, yeah I can't believe there's places where you can walk in, and walk out with a gun. I got a pistol about five years ago, and it took a few days for everything to come back. 
    2000: Camden 1, 2003: Philly, State College, Camden 1, MSG 2, Hershey, 2004: Reading, 2005: Philly, 2006: Camden 1, 2, East Rutherford 1, 2007: Lollapalooza, 2008: Camden 1, Washington D.C., MSG 1, 2, 2009: Philly 1, 2, 3, 4, 2010: Bristol, MSG 2, 2011: PJ20 1, 2, 2012: Made In America, 2013: Brooklyn 2, Philly 2, 2014: Denver, 2015: Global Citizen Festival, 2016: Philly 2, Fenway 1, 2018: Fenway 1, 2, 2021: Sea. Hear. Now.

    Pearl Jam bootlegs:
    http://wegotshit.blogspot.com
  • Ledbetterman10Ledbetterman10 Posts: 15,034
    nicknyr15 said:
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
    I know I see most things differently than most in here, but I have always believed in stricter gun policies.

    I was sitting in a barber shop several years back, and this guy walks in with a gun and big brown holsters and looked like he climbed off his horse and walked in to the Wild West Saloon.  I will never understand the need to carry a gun to get your hair cut.  
    I don't get that either. My friends and I do a lot of deep woods hiking, and I bring my glock in my backpack (unloaded, magazine in a different place than the gun) just in case of some extreme circumstance (like coming across a mountain lion or something else that may attack). But one of my friends wears the over-the-shoulder holsters with the gun loaded (without a round in the chamber). Seems a little unnecessary. And it'd be one thing if he put it on once we got in the woods, but he puts it on as soon as we get out of our cars. The other day, to get to the woods, we had to walk past a youth lacrosse practice. I was a little embarrassed. He looked like he, well, as you said, he was walking into a wild west saloon.  
    2000: Camden 1, 2003: Philly, State College, Camden 1, MSG 2, Hershey, 2004: Reading, 2005: Philly, 2006: Camden 1, 2, East Rutherford 1, 2007: Lollapalooza, 2008: Camden 1, Washington D.C., MSG 1, 2, 2009: Philly 1, 2, 3, 4, 2010: Bristol, MSG 2, 2011: PJ20 1, 2, 2012: Made In America, 2013: Brooklyn 2, Philly 2, 2014: Denver, 2015: Global Citizen Festival, 2016: Philly 2, Fenway 1, 2018: Fenway 1, 2, 2021: Sea. Hear. Now.

    Pearl Jam bootlegs:
    http://wegotshit.blogspot.com
  • nicknyr15nicknyr15 Posts: 4,689
    nicknyr15 said:
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
    Hmm...that seems strange. What were the circumstances that caused this?

    As for the rest, yeah I can't believe there's places where you can walk in, and walk out with a gun. I got a pistol about five years ago, and it took a few days for everything to come back. 
    My lawyer told me there was a huge influx of applications. 
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 6,239
    edited April 8
    nicknyr15 said:
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
    Hmm...that seems strange. What were the circumstances that caused this?

    As for the rest, yeah I can't believe there's places where you can walk in, and walk out with a gun. I got a pistol about five years ago, and it took a few days for everything to come back. 
    Can't speak for him. But I know my brother had to go through a huge hassle to store a gun inside the home and foster and then adopt his 2 girls to keep a gun in his house. And he's a cop. Don't think he had to get a lawyer involved, but there was just so much red tape involved it held things up a while.
    Post edited by mace1229 on
  • nicknyr15nicknyr15 Posts: 4,689
    mace1229 said:
    nicknyr15 said:
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
    Hmm...that seems strange. What were the circumstances that caused this?

    As for the rest, yeah I can't believe there's places where you can walk in, and walk out with a gun. I got a pistol about five years ago, and it took a few days for everything to come back. 
    Can't speak for him. But I know my brother had to go through a huge hassle to store a gun inside the home and foster and then adopt his 2 girls to keep a gun in his house. And he's a cop. Don't think he had to get a lawyer involved, but there was just so much red tape involved it held things up a while.
    In NY it feels like it’s setup for the applicant to give up and not follow through until the end. 
  • Ledbetterman10Ledbetterman10 Posts: 15,034
    I guess it also depends on which state you're in. In Pennsylvania, you don't need a license to have a firearm in your home or place of business, but do need one to have it concealed on you person, in your vehicle, or in your purse/backpack/etc. Strangely, and stupidly I think, you DON'T need license to open carry. 
    2000: Camden 1, 2003: Philly, State College, Camden 1, MSG 2, Hershey, 2004: Reading, 2005: Philly, 2006: Camden 1, 2, East Rutherford 1, 2007: Lollapalooza, 2008: Camden 1, Washington D.C., MSG 1, 2, 2009: Philly 1, 2, 3, 4, 2010: Bristol, MSG 2, 2011: PJ20 1, 2, 2012: Made In America, 2013: Brooklyn 2, Philly 2, 2014: Denver, 2015: Global Citizen Festival, 2016: Philly 2, Fenway 1, 2018: Fenway 1, 2, 2021: Sea. Hear. Now.

    Pearl Jam bootlegs:
    http://wegotshit.blogspot.com
  • gvn2fly1421gvn2fly1421 Posts: 935
    In Tennessee, I can walk in to Academy Sports right now and walk out with whatever gun I want.  I have actually contemplated it lately, but to be honest, the thought of having a gun in the house scares the shit out of me.  Not sure of the background checks conducted here, but I know that any type of permit is not needed.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,235
    nicknyr15 said:
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
    I know I see most things differently than most in here, but I have always believed in stricter gun policies.

    I was sitting in a barber shop several years back, and this guy walks in with a gun and big brown holsters and looked like he climbed off his horse and walked in to the Wild West Saloon.  I will never understand the need to carry a gun to get your hair cut.  
    I don't get that either. My friends and I do a lot of deep woods hiking, and I bring my glock in my backpack (unloaded, magazine in a different place than the gun) just in case of some extreme circumstance (like coming across a mountain lion or something else that may attack). But one of my friends wears the over-the-shoulder holsters with the gun loaded (without a round in the chamber). Seems a little unnecessary. And it'd be one thing if he put it on once we got in the woods, but he puts it on as soon as we get out of our cars. The other day, to get to the woods, we had to walk past a youth lacrosse practice. I was a little embarrassed. He looked like he, well, as you said, he was walking into a wild west saloon.  
    That mountain lion will have killed all of you by the time you got to the gun.

    When I hike with one it is concealed.  No need to have it exposed.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,235
    In Tennessee, I can walk in to Academy Sports right now and walk out with whatever gun I want.  I have actually contemplated it lately, but to be honest, the thought of having a gun in the house scares the shit out of me.  Not sure of the background checks conducted here, but I know that any type of permit is not needed.
    You can't do that with a handgun.  That is against the law.
  • Ledbetterman10Ledbetterman10 Posts: 15,034
    nicknyr15 said:
    It’s amazing to me that people can walk in a store and walk out with a gun. It took me almost 18 months, with a lawyer, just to be able to keep a handgun in my house. Then again, you can buy one on the street in about 30 seconds. 
    I know I see most things differently than most in here, but I have always believed in stricter gun policies.

    I was sitting in a barber shop several years back, and this guy walks in with a gun and big brown holsters and looked like he climbed off his horse and walked in to the Wild West Saloon.  I will never understand the need to carry a gun to get your hair cut.  
    I don't get that either. My friends and I do a lot of deep woods hiking, and I bring my glock in my backpack (unloaded, magazine in a different place than the gun) just in case of some extreme circumstance (like coming across a mountain lion or something else that may attack). But one of my friends wears the over-the-shoulder holsters with the gun loaded (without a round in the chamber). Seems a little unnecessary. And it'd be one thing if he put it on once we got in the woods, but he puts it on as soon as we get out of our cars. The other day, to get to the woods, we had to walk past a youth lacrosse practice. I was a little embarrassed. He looked like he, well, as you said, he was walking into a wild west saloon.  
    That mountain lion will have killed all of you by the time you got to the gun.

    When I hike with one it is concealed.  No need to have it exposed.
    I'm working under the assumption that I've seen it already in the distance and was able to get prepared. But yeah, if just attacked out of nowhere, I'd be screwed. 
    2000: Camden 1, 2003: Philly, State College, Camden 1, MSG 2, Hershey, 2004: Reading, 2005: Philly, 2006: Camden 1, 2, East Rutherford 1, 2007: Lollapalooza, 2008: Camden 1, Washington D.C., MSG 1, 2, 2009: Philly 1, 2, 3, 4, 2010: Bristol, MSG 2, 2011: PJ20 1, 2, 2012: Made In America, 2013: Brooklyn 2, Philly 2, 2014: Denver, 2015: Global Citizen Festival, 2016: Philly 2, Fenway 1, 2018: Fenway 1, 2, 2021: Sea. Hear. Now.

    Pearl Jam bootlegs:
    http://wegotshit.blogspot.com
  • gvn2fly1421gvn2fly1421 Posts: 935
    In Tennessee, I can walk in to Academy Sports right now and walk out with whatever gun I want.  I have actually contemplated it lately, but to be honest, the thought of having a gun in the house scares the shit out of me.  Not sure of the background checks conducted here, but I know that any type of permit is not needed.
    You can't do that with a handgun.  That is against the law.
    You sure?  What do I need to provide?  A valid drivers license?  I have always been under the impression I did not need any type of carrying permit or gun safety class to walk into a store and buy a gun.  Carrying is obviously different.  
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,235
    You need to have a background check in all 50 states when purchasing a gun from a store/dealer.  You have a waiting period to obtain a handgun in all 50 states from a store.

    There are some states that do not require a personal sale of a handgun to have a paper trail.  You had better damn well have done it legally though.
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 6,239
    In Tennessee, I can walk in to Academy Sports right now and walk out with whatever gun I want.  I have actually contemplated it lately, but to be honest, the thought of having a gun in the house scares the shit out of me.  Not sure of the background checks conducted here, but I know that any type of permit is not needed.
    You can't do that with a handgun.  That is against the law.
    Are you sure? He didn't say no background check, just no license needed. That's pretty much how it works in Colorado. Wouldn't be surprised if it was the same in TN. I'm used to buying guns in California and waiting 10 days or whatever it was while they do the background check.
    Bought my first gun in Colorado a few years ago after I moved, not even thinking I would leave with it. The guy rings me up, says hold on while we do a background check, and 15 minutes later he gives me the gun and says have a nice day. I was actually surprised when it happened, so different from what I was used to.
  • gvn2fly1421gvn2fly1421 Posts: 935
    edited April 8
    You need to have a background check in all 50 states when purchasing a gun from a store/dealer.  You have a waiting period to obtain a handgun in all 50 states from a store.

    There are some states that do not require a personal sale of a handgun to have a paper trail.  You had better damn well have done it legally though.
    I thought my post said not sure of the background checks required.  Again, me being a law abiding citizen could walk into a store and walk out with a gun.  

    Edit- Not sure of the waiting period and how long that is, that might effect the walk in/walk out narrative.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,235
    mace1229 said:
    In Tennessee, I can walk in to Academy Sports right now and walk out with whatever gun I want.  I have actually contemplated it lately, but to be honest, the thought of having a gun in the house scares the shit out of me.  Not sure of the background checks conducted here, but I know that any type of permit is not needed.
    You can't do that with a handgun.  That is against the law.
    Are you sure? He didn't say no background check, just no license needed. That's pretty much how it works in Colorado. Wouldn't be surprised if it was the same in TN. I'm used to buying guns in California and waiting 10 days or whatever it was while they do the background check.
    Bought my first gun in Colorado a few years ago after I moved, not even thinking I would leave with it. The guy rings me up, says hold on while we do a background check, and 15 minutes later he gives me the gun and says have a nice day. I was actually surprised when it happened, so different from what I was used to.
    Correct, no license needed to purchase one.

    The waiting period thing I may be wrong on but I did have to wait in Fl, CA and PA.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,235
    I am mistaken about the waiting period.

    You can, in most states if background check clears, walk out w a handgun that day.

    I actually don't agree w that.  Wait a week.  I'm ok with that.
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 6,239
    edited April 8
    mace1229 said:
    In Tennessee, I can walk in to Academy Sports right now and walk out with whatever gun I want.  I have actually contemplated it lately, but to be honest, the thought of having a gun in the house scares the shit out of me.  Not sure of the background checks conducted here, but I know that any type of permit is not needed.
    You can't do that with a handgun.  That is against the law.
    Are you sure? He didn't say no background check, just no license needed. That's pretty much how it works in Colorado. Wouldn't be surprised if it was the same in TN. I'm used to buying guns in California and waiting 10 days or whatever it was while they do the background check.
    Bought my first gun in Colorado a few years ago after I moved, not even thinking I would leave with it. The guy rings me up, says hold on while we do a background check, and 15 minutes later he gives me the gun and says have a nice day. I was actually surprised when it happened, so different from what I was used to.
    Correct, no license needed to purchase one.

    The waiting period thing I may be wrong on but I did have to wait in Fl, CA and PA.
    A lot of states don't have a waiting period. Can't tell you for sure which ones other than CO. I did have to have a safety test card in California, which I guess one could consider some sort of "license." The test was a complete joke though, and just a way to either deter people from buying financially or essentially a tax on guns, because no way did it serve any real purpose. I think you had to renew or retest every 2 years too, even though you kept your guns. Again, seems like a revenue thing more than safety. 
    Post edited by mace1229 on
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