I just picked up _____ on vinyl!

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Comments

  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    mickeyrat said:
    Merriam-Webster's definition of "spaz":  http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spaz
    I have always thought it to mean this.  Someone high sprung or a goof.  Never have I ever heard the word Spaz used to put down someone with cerebral palsy.
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    New Beyonce album just showed up. yessssssssss

    Not meaning to burst your bubble, Tim, but you might want to check this out first:

    When Beyoncé dropped the same ableist slur as Lizzo on her new album, my heart sank

    Hannah Diviney

    It’s not very often that I don’t know what to say, rendered speechless by ignorance, sadness and a simmering anger born of bone-deep exhaustion. But that’s how I feel right now.

    Six weeks ago I called out American singer, Lizzo, on Twitter for her use of an ableist slur (“spaz”) in a new song. That tweet of mine – which explained how the slur was connected to my disability, cerebral palsy – took me less than five minutes to write and it went viral, landing on the front page of global news outlets including the BBC, New York Times and the Washington Post.

    Lizzo herself even took notice, changing the lyric and giving us all a masterclass in how to be a true and effective ally.

    I thought we’d changed the music industry and started a global conversation about why ableist language – intentional or not – has no place in music. But I guess I was wrong, because now Beyoncé has gone and done exactly the same thing. In fact, she’s used the word “spaz” twice in a new song Heated, a co-write with Canadian rapper Drake off her new album, Renaissance, which dropped on Friday.

    I found out by way of a snarky mention on Twitter asking if I planned to tell Queen Bey to “do better” like I had with Lizzo. My heart sank. Here we were again, but this time the stakes feel higher. Calling this one out is a whole other level.

    Whenever Beyoncé so much as breathes it becomes a cultural moment. She’s often the blueprint for the music industry – with artists and entertainers following her lead. That’s the status she has earned after decades of a career at the top, never making the same move twice, seeming to play in an entirely different league to the majority of the music industry.

    Beyoncé’s commitment to storytelling musically and visually is unparalleled, as is her power to have the world paying attention to the narratives, struggles and nuanced lived experience of being a black woman – a world I can only ever understand as an ally, and have no desire to overshadow.

    But that doesn’t excuse her use of ableist language – language that gets used and ignored all too often. Language you can be sure I will never ignore, no matter who it comes from or what the circumstances are. It doesn’t excuse the fact that the teams of people involved in making this album somehow missed all the noise the disabled community made only six weeks ago when Lizzo did the same thing.

    It doesn’t explain how millions of people have already heard this album and yet aren’t raising the issue, except to make fun of or degrade the disabled community.

    I’m so tired. Disabled people deserve better. I don’t want to have this conversation again.







    Yeah. I heard it in the song last week. It’s a bummer. I’d rather them own it and be better going forward than not doing anything. 

    I'm really hoping she comes around on this one.  And it probably wasn't meant to be derogatory, but how do you tell that to someone with a disability?  She would do well to make amends somehow.  I guess we'll have to wait and see.
    Never heard of it used in that way.  Is this new?
    Same with me.. like a dork. 

    I'm sure someone is going to tell me that "dork" is a slur for something too.
    It's where I draw the line at the PC thing sometimes...  I still don't get how mulatto is a slur...
    I get that one.. it's someone half black and half white.  To me, a person can choose to be a spaz, a dork, a jerk, an idiot.  It's not specific to race, creed, color, etc.  Mulatto is specific. 
    I always thought it was to describe a color, not black not white, a mix.  Again, I don't get to why it's a slur.  Someone back in the day must have done stupid shit with the word to make it taboo.
    No, it's a description of your parents, not a color.  Miscegenation was illegal in many states, so being a 'mulatto' is akin to being a bastard or being illegal. 
    No shit?  That was a term to describe an illegal mixed breeding?  Any time I have looked up mulatto it says "mix of black and white" so you can see how I never get the taboo part out of it.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    goldrush said:
    I’ve only ever known the word ‘sp*z’ as an offensive term (it’s literally an abbreviation of spastic paralysis). Growing up in the UK we’d always get into trouble if anyone called someone that word. I guess that highlights the differences in countries and cultures. 
    Another example would be the word ‘c**n’. In the UK, it was a really offensive racist slur, in the US, it could be short for raccoon, in Australia it’s a brand of cheese!

    I can see both sides - on the one hand, are Beyoncé and Lizzo really supposed to know the global differences in interpretations? On the other hand, there are so many co-writers and collaborators on a Beyoncé record that she’s more like a band than a solo artist. Surely one of them would’ve picked up on it, especially so soon after Lizzo?
    You also call a fag a cigarette where here in the US it has a complete different meaning.  Is anyone trying to change the culture over there and stop calling a smoke a fag?

    Or is that ridiculous?
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 25,686
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    mickeyrat said:
    Merriam-Webster's definition of "spaz":  http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spaz
    I have always thought it to mean this.  Someone high sprung or a goof.  Never have I ever heard the word Spaz used to put down someone with cerebral palsy.
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    New Beyonce album just showed up. yessssssssss

    Not meaning to burst your bubble, Tim, but you might want to check this out first:

    When Beyoncé dropped the same ableist slur as Lizzo on her new album, my heart sank

    Hannah Diviney

    It’s not very often that I don’t know what to say, rendered speechless by ignorance, sadness and a simmering anger born of bone-deep exhaustion. But that’s how I feel right now.

    Six weeks ago I called out American singer, Lizzo, on Twitter for her use of an ableist slur (“spaz”) in a new song. That tweet of mine – which explained how the slur was connected to my disability, cerebral palsy – took me less than five minutes to write and it went viral, landing on the front page of global news outlets including the BBC, New York Times and the Washington Post.

    Lizzo herself even took notice, changing the lyric and giving us all a masterclass in how to be a true and effective ally.

    I thought we’d changed the music industry and started a global conversation about why ableist language – intentional or not – has no place in music. But I guess I was wrong, because now Beyoncé has gone and done exactly the same thing. In fact, she’s used the word “spaz” twice in a new song Heated, a co-write with Canadian rapper Drake off her new album, Renaissance, which dropped on Friday.

    I found out by way of a snarky mention on Twitter asking if I planned to tell Queen Bey to “do better” like I had with Lizzo. My heart sank. Here we were again, but this time the stakes feel higher. Calling this one out is a whole other level.

    Whenever Beyoncé so much as breathes it becomes a cultural moment. She’s often the blueprint for the music industry – with artists and entertainers following her lead. That’s the status she has earned after decades of a career at the top, never making the same move twice, seeming to play in an entirely different league to the majority of the music industry.

    Beyoncé’s commitment to storytelling musically and visually is unparalleled, as is her power to have the world paying attention to the narratives, struggles and nuanced lived experience of being a black woman – a world I can only ever understand as an ally, and have no desire to overshadow.

    But that doesn’t excuse her use of ableist language – language that gets used and ignored all too often. Language you can be sure I will never ignore, no matter who it comes from or what the circumstances are. It doesn’t excuse the fact that the teams of people involved in making this album somehow missed all the noise the disabled community made only six weeks ago when Lizzo did the same thing.

    It doesn’t explain how millions of people have already heard this album and yet aren’t raising the issue, except to make fun of or degrade the disabled community.

    I’m so tired. Disabled people deserve better. I don’t want to have this conversation again.







    Yeah. I heard it in the song last week. It’s a bummer. I’d rather them own it and be better going forward than not doing anything. 

    I'm really hoping she comes around on this one.  And it probably wasn't meant to be derogatory, but how do you tell that to someone with a disability?  She would do well to make amends somehow.  I guess we'll have to wait and see.
    Never heard of it used in that way.  Is this new?
    Same with me.. like a dork. 

    I'm sure someone is going to tell me that "dork" is a slur for something too.
    It's where I draw the line at the PC thing sometimes...  I still don't get how mulatto is a slur...
    I get that one.. it's someone half black and half white.  To me, a person can choose to be a spaz, a dork, a jerk, an idiot.  It's not specific to race, creed, color, etc.  Mulatto is specific. 
    I always thought it was to describe a color, not black not white, a mix.  Again, I don't get to why it's a slur.  Someone back in the day must have done stupid shit with the word to make it taboo.
    No, it's a description of your parents, not a color.  Miscegenation was illegal in many states, so being a 'mulatto' is akin to being a bastard or being illegal. 
    No shit?  That was a term to describe an illegal mixed breeding?  Any time I have looked up mulatto it says "mix of black and white" so you can see how I never get the taboo part out of it.
    I wouldn't go so far as it's a term to describe ILLEGAL mixed breeding.  I'm saying it's a breeding term and mixed was illegal in some states. 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    mickeyrat said:
    Merriam-Webster's definition of "spaz":  http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spaz
    I have always thought it to mean this.  Someone high sprung or a goof.  Never have I ever heard the word Spaz used to put down someone with cerebral palsy.
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    New Beyonce album just showed up. yessssssssss

    Not meaning to burst your bubble, Tim, but you might want to check this out first:

    When Beyoncé dropped the same ableist slur as Lizzo on her new album, my heart sank

    Hannah Diviney

    It’s not very often that I don’t know what to say, rendered speechless by ignorance, sadness and a simmering anger born of bone-deep exhaustion. But that’s how I feel right now.

    Six weeks ago I called out American singer, Lizzo, on Twitter for her use of an ableist slur (“spaz”) in a new song. That tweet of mine – which explained how the slur was connected to my disability, cerebral palsy – took me less than five minutes to write and it went viral, landing on the front page of global news outlets including the BBC, New York Times and the Washington Post.

    Lizzo herself even took notice, changing the lyric and giving us all a masterclass in how to be a true and effective ally.

    I thought we’d changed the music industry and started a global conversation about why ableist language – intentional or not – has no place in music. But I guess I was wrong, because now Beyoncé has gone and done exactly the same thing. In fact, she’s used the word “spaz” twice in a new song Heated, a co-write with Canadian rapper Drake off her new album, Renaissance, which dropped on Friday.

    I found out by way of a snarky mention on Twitter asking if I planned to tell Queen Bey to “do better” like I had with Lizzo. My heart sank. Here we were again, but this time the stakes feel higher. Calling this one out is a whole other level.

    Whenever Beyoncé so much as breathes it becomes a cultural moment. She’s often the blueprint for the music industry – with artists and entertainers following her lead. That’s the status she has earned after decades of a career at the top, never making the same move twice, seeming to play in an entirely different league to the majority of the music industry.

    Beyoncé’s commitment to storytelling musically and visually is unparalleled, as is her power to have the world paying attention to the narratives, struggles and nuanced lived experience of being a black woman – a world I can only ever understand as an ally, and have no desire to overshadow.

    But that doesn’t excuse her use of ableist language – language that gets used and ignored all too often. Language you can be sure I will never ignore, no matter who it comes from or what the circumstances are. It doesn’t excuse the fact that the teams of people involved in making this album somehow missed all the noise the disabled community made only six weeks ago when Lizzo did the same thing.

    It doesn’t explain how millions of people have already heard this album and yet aren’t raising the issue, except to make fun of or degrade the disabled community.

    I’m so tired. Disabled people deserve better. I don’t want to have this conversation again.







    Yeah. I heard it in the song last week. It’s a bummer. I’d rather them own it and be better going forward than not doing anything. 

    I'm really hoping she comes around on this one.  And it probably wasn't meant to be derogatory, but how do you tell that to someone with a disability?  She would do well to make amends somehow.  I guess we'll have to wait and see.
    Never heard of it used in that way.  Is this new?
    Same with me.. like a dork. 

    I'm sure someone is going to tell me that "dork" is a slur for something too.
    It's where I draw the line at the PC thing sometimes...  I still don't get how mulatto is a slur...
    I get that one.. it's someone half black and half white.  To me, a person can choose to be a spaz, a dork, a jerk, an idiot.  It's not specific to race, creed, color, etc.  Mulatto is specific. 
    I always thought it was to describe a color, not black not white, a mix.  Again, I don't get to why it's a slur.  Someone back in the day must have done stupid shit with the word to make it taboo.
    No, it's a description of your parents, not a color.  Miscegenation was illegal in many states, so being a 'mulatto' is akin to being a bastard or being illegal. 
    No shit?  That was a term to describe an illegal mixed breeding?  Any time I have looked up mulatto it says "mix of black and white" so you can see how I never get the taboo part out of it.
    I wouldn't go so far as it's a term to describe ILLEGAL mixed breeding.  I'm saying it's a breeding term and mixed was illegal in some states. 
    So I am back to square one and don't see the taboo part...  I need to research the word and go down the rabbit hole.
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 25,666
    goldrush said:
    I’ve only ever known the word ‘sp*z’ as an offensive term (it’s literally an abbreviation of spastic paralysis). Growing up in the UK we’d always get into trouble if anyone called someone that word. I guess that highlights the differences in countries and cultures. 
    Another example would be the word ‘c**n’. In the UK, it was a really offensive racist slur, in the US, it could be short for raccoon, in Australia it’s a brand of cheese!

    I can see both sides - on the one hand, are Beyoncé and Lizzo really supposed to know the global differences in interpretations? On the other hand, there are so many co-writers and collaborators on a Beyoncé record that she’s more like a band than a solo artist. Surely one of them would’ve picked up on it, especially so soon after Lizzo?
    You also call a fag a cigarette where here in the US it has a complete different meaning.  Is anyone trying to change the culture over there and stop calling a smoke a fag?

    Or is that ridiculous?

    not to mention the uk and aus liberal use of cunt
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • Tim SimmonsTim Simmons Posts: 6,130
    edited August 2
    I think like a lot of white created slurs for black people, its indebted to prejudice and has become outdated and offensive. 
    Post edited by Tim Simmons on
  • Tim SimmonsTim Simmons Posts: 6,130
    I gotta be honest, theres no derogatory term that I am willing to die on a hill to defend using. Its not a big deal to me to stop using something if it offends people. 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    mickeyrat said:
    goldrush said:
    I’ve only ever known the word ‘sp*z’ as an offensive term (it’s literally an abbreviation of spastic paralysis). Growing up in the UK we’d always get into trouble if anyone called someone that word. I guess that highlights the differences in countries and cultures. 
    Another example would be the word ‘c**n’. In the UK, it was a really offensive racist slur, in the US, it could be short for raccoon, in Australia it’s a brand of cheese!

    I can see both sides - on the one hand, are Beyoncé and Lizzo really supposed to know the global differences in interpretations? On the other hand, there are so many co-writers and collaborators on a Beyoncé record that she’s more like a band than a solo artist. Surely one of them would’ve picked up on it, especially so soon after Lizzo?
    You also call a fag a cigarette where here in the US it has a complete different meaning.  Is anyone trying to change the culture over there and stop calling a smoke a fag?

    Or is that ridiculous?

    not to mention the uk and aus liberal use of cunt
    I love that word and when they use it, lol.  It's a term of endearment sometimes too but here?  Nope...
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    I gotta be honest, theres no derogatory term that I am willing to die on a hill to defend using. Its not a big deal to me to stop using something if it offends people. 
    If it has a separate meaning.  Words and meaning of them change.  But yeah, I have changed my use of certain words over the years and have removed plenty from my vocabulary.


  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 25,686
    I gotta be honest, theres no derogatory term that I am willing to die on a hill to defend using. Its not a big deal to me to stop using something if it offends people. 
    If it has a separate meaning.  Words and meaning of them change.  But yeah, I have changed my use of certain words over the years and have removed plenty from my vocabulary.


    So long as they don't touch "douchebag" 
  • Tim SimmonsTim Simmons Posts: 6,130
    eh, even if it has a secondary meaning (like the UK slang for cigarette), the ambiguity isn't worth it. There are other words.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    mrussel1 said:
    I gotta be honest, theres no derogatory term that I am willing to die on a hill to defend using. Its not a big deal to me to stop using something if it offends people. 
    If it has a separate meaning.  Words and meaning of them change.  But yeah, I have changed my use of certain words over the years and have removed plenty from my vocabulary.


    So long as they don't touch "douchebag" 
    I always thought Son of a Bitch was a prime target to get the axe but here we are in the year 2022 and it's still a favorite of the people, lol!
  • LoujoeLoujoe Posts: 4,732


  • LoujoeLoujoe Posts: 4,732
    I get it now. It's cultural that's why I didn't understand. Hey if I say f..k you all is that ok? :)
  • LoujoeLoujoe Posts: 4,732
    Honestly. I said mother f..ker to my friend that's from south america and he was very offended. Here, in US insulting someone's mom was always kind of a fun joke as kids. So I get that we need to be understanding. Where it gets confusing to me is when is it time for the people that are offended to understand that it's not intended to be insulting. Idk. It's confusing.
    Love most people of this world and hope never to insult anyone unintentionally.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 25,686
    Loujoe said:
    Honestly. I said mother f..ker to my friend that's from south america and he was very offended. Here, in US insulting someone's mom was always kind of a fun joke as kids. So I get that we need to be understanding. Where it gets confusing to me is when is it time for the people that are offended to understand that it's not intended to be insulting. Idk. It's confusing.
    Love most people of this world and hope never to insult anyone unintentionally.
    Right, MFer is not a literal statement here in the US and doesn't have anything to do with one's mom (like sonuvabitch). 
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 20,634

    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • LoujoeLoujoe Posts: 4,732
    edited August 2
    Thread integrity
     Donovan-open road-only listened to side a, different but love Donovan
    Ink spots-band signed score. Kind of dumb but am a sucker for band signed stuff. Thinking about its history and how important it was for someone. 
    Both dirt cheap
    Would post a picture, but my phone is not behaving properly. 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    dankind said:

    I miss him...
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 25,686
    MedozK said:
    mrussel1 said:
    MedozK said:
    @mrussel1, I just picked up 2 very nice VG+++ '75-'77 pressings of Exile and Sticky Fingers. Can't wait to A/B these with the reissues. The Exile is an Artisan plate... was excited to get these. 

    In the same purchase picked up late VG+++ 70s pressings of Animals and Meddle.  All of these from the same seller, crazy good condition.
    That's great!  What happened with that other Exile you found a few weeks ago?
    It is ok, but to much surface noise for me.
    UPDATE ON EXILE!  @MedozK
  • mookeywrenchmookeywrench Posts: 5,508
    I gotta be honest, theres no derogatory term that I am willing to die on a hill to defend using. Its not a big deal to me to stop using something if it offends people. 
    A Tim is derogatory irish slang for being catholic.

    Please make sure to change your username at your earliest convenience.

    350x700px-LL-d2f49cb4_vinyl-needle-scu-e1356666258495.jpeg
  • Tim SimmonsTim Simmons Posts: 6,130
    edited August 2
    Well, I’m Catholic, so it’s ok for me to say that. And like a good catholic, its all about self loathing.
    Post edited by Tim Simmons on
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 25,666
    Loujoe said:
    I get it now. It's cultural that's why I didn't understand. Hey if I say f..k you all is that ok? :)

    not here. dont ask how I know. just trust and believe.
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 20,634
    That reminds me. I haven't dropped a "fuck y'all" in the Yankees thread in a while. 

    Looks like it'll be less than a fortnight.
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • MedozKMedozK TennesseePosts: 9,095
    edited August 3
    mrussel1 said:
    MedozK said:
    mrussel1 said:
    MedozK said:
    @mrussel1, I just picked up 2 very nice VG+++ '75-'77 pressings of Exile and Sticky Fingers. Can't wait to A/B these with the reissues. The Exile is an Artisan plate... was excited to get these. 

    In the same purchase picked up late VG+++ 70s pressings of Animals and Meddle.  All of these from the same seller, crazy good condition.
    That's great!  What happened with that other Exile you found a few weeks ago?
    It is ok, but to much surface noise for me.
    UPDATE ON EXILE!  @MedozK
    Been crazy busy. I am going to take it for an A/B with the 2020 this weekend.

    I have already spun it though, and it is crazy quiet. Sounds really good, but I want to see where it stands listening to both back to back.
    Post edited by MedozK on
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,607

    mickeyrat said:
    Merriam-Webster's definition of "spaz":  http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spaz
    I have always thought it to mean this.  Someone high sprung or a goof.  Never have I ever heard the word Spaz used to put down someone with cerebral palsy.
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    New Beyonce album just showed up. yessssssssss

    Not meaning to burst your bubble, Tim, but you might want to check this out first:

    When Beyoncé dropped the same ableist slur as Lizzo on her new album, my heart sank

    Hannah Diviney

    It’s not very often that I don’t know what to say, rendered speechless by ignorance, sadness and a simmering anger born of bone-deep exhaustion. But that’s how I feel right now.

    Six weeks ago I called out American singer, Lizzo, on Twitter for her use of an ableist slur (“spaz”) in a new song. That tweet of mine – which explained how the slur was connected to my disability, cerebral palsy – took me less than five minutes to write and it went viral, landing on the front page of global news outlets including the BBC, New York Times and the Washington Post.

    Lizzo herself even took notice, changing the lyric and giving us all a masterclass in how to be a true and effective ally.

    I thought we’d changed the music industry and started a global conversation about why ableist language – intentional or not – has no place in music. But I guess I was wrong, because now Beyoncé has gone and done exactly the same thing. In fact, she’s used the word “spaz” twice in a new song Heated, a co-write with Canadian rapper Drake off her new album, Renaissance, which dropped on Friday.

    I found out by way of a snarky mention on Twitter asking if I planned to tell Queen Bey to “do better” like I had with Lizzo. My heart sank. Here we were again, but this time the stakes feel higher. Calling this one out is a whole other level.

    Whenever Beyoncé so much as breathes it becomes a cultural moment. She’s often the blueprint for the music industry – with artists and entertainers following her lead. That’s the status she has earned after decades of a career at the top, never making the same move twice, seeming to play in an entirely different league to the majority of the music industry.

    Beyoncé’s commitment to storytelling musically and visually is unparalleled, as is her power to have the world paying attention to the narratives, struggles and nuanced lived experience of being a black woman – a world I can only ever understand as an ally, and have no desire to overshadow.

    But that doesn’t excuse her use of ableist language – language that gets used and ignored all too often. Language you can be sure I will never ignore, no matter who it comes from or what the circumstances are. It doesn’t excuse the fact that the teams of people involved in making this album somehow missed all the noise the disabled community made only six weeks ago when Lizzo did the same thing.

    It doesn’t explain how millions of people have already heard this album and yet aren’t raising the issue, except to make fun of or degrade the disabled community.

    I’m so tired. Disabled people deserve better. I don’t want to have this conversation again.







    Yeah. I heard it in the song last week. It’s a bummer. I’d rather them own it and be better going forward than not doing anything. 

    I'm really hoping she comes around on this one.  And it probably wasn't meant to be derogatory, but how do you tell that to someone with a disability?  She would do well to make amends somehow.  I guess we'll have to wait and see.
    Never heard of it used in that way.  Is this new?

    It's not new to my knowledge, but then in the late 80's I subbed special ed a few times, have personally known Down Syndrome folks, have worked  with people in the disabilities office at our local community college from the late 1990's to early 2000's, volunteered 1,000 hours at our health library, so I might take it for granted that most people know "spaz" is a derogatory term.  To my way of thinking, it really should be common knowledge. 

    And yes, same with "dork".  Kind of hard to believe that one is still thrown around. It too, by definition, is a derogatory term. 

    It seems to me that people who throw those terms around either have no experience with people with disabilities or maybe even have disdain for them.  It sucks being disabled.  Why make it harder? (I mean that generally.  I'm not pointing fingers at anyone specifically.)
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    brianlux said:

    mickeyrat said:
    Merriam-Webster's definition of "spaz":  http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spaz
    I have always thought it to mean this.  Someone high sprung or a goof.  Never have I ever heard the word Spaz used to put down someone with cerebral palsy.
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    New Beyonce album just showed up. yessssssssss

    Not meaning to burst your bubble, Tim, but you might want to check this out first:

    When Beyoncé dropped the same ableist slur as Lizzo on her new album, my heart sank

    Hannah Diviney

    It’s not very often that I don’t know what to say, rendered speechless by ignorance, sadness and a simmering anger born of bone-deep exhaustion. But that’s how I feel right now.

    Six weeks ago I called out American singer, Lizzo, on Twitter for her use of an ableist slur (“spaz”) in a new song. That tweet of mine – which explained how the slur was connected to my disability, cerebral palsy – took me less than five minutes to write and it went viral, landing on the front page of global news outlets including the BBC, New York Times and the Washington Post.

    Lizzo herself even took notice, changing the lyric and giving us all a masterclass in how to be a true and effective ally.

    I thought we’d changed the music industry and started a global conversation about why ableist language – intentional or not – has no place in music. But I guess I was wrong, because now Beyoncé has gone and done exactly the same thing. In fact, she’s used the word “spaz” twice in a new song Heated, a co-write with Canadian rapper Drake off her new album, Renaissance, which dropped on Friday.

    I found out by way of a snarky mention on Twitter asking if I planned to tell Queen Bey to “do better” like I had with Lizzo. My heart sank. Here we were again, but this time the stakes feel higher. Calling this one out is a whole other level.

    Whenever Beyoncé so much as breathes it becomes a cultural moment. She’s often the blueprint for the music industry – with artists and entertainers following her lead. That’s the status she has earned after decades of a career at the top, never making the same move twice, seeming to play in an entirely different league to the majority of the music industry.

    Beyoncé’s commitment to storytelling musically and visually is unparalleled, as is her power to have the world paying attention to the narratives, struggles and nuanced lived experience of being a black woman – a world I can only ever understand as an ally, and have no desire to overshadow.

    But that doesn’t excuse her use of ableist language – language that gets used and ignored all too often. Language you can be sure I will never ignore, no matter who it comes from or what the circumstances are. It doesn’t excuse the fact that the teams of people involved in making this album somehow missed all the noise the disabled community made only six weeks ago when Lizzo did the same thing.

    It doesn’t explain how millions of people have already heard this album and yet aren’t raising the issue, except to make fun of or degrade the disabled community.

    I’m so tired. Disabled people deserve better. I don’t want to have this conversation again.







    Yeah. I heard it in the song last week. It’s a bummer. I’d rather them own it and be better going forward than not doing anything. 

    I'm really hoping she comes around on this one.  And it probably wasn't meant to be derogatory, but how do you tell that to someone with a disability?  She would do well to make amends somehow.  I guess we'll have to wait and see.
    Never heard of it used in that way.  Is this new?

    It's not new to my knowledge, but then in the late 80's I subbed special ed a few times, have personally known Down Syndrome folks, have worked  with people in the disabilities office at our local community college from the late 1990's to early 2000's, volunteered 1,000 hours at our health library, so I might take it for granted that most people know "spaz" is a derogatory term.  To my way of thinking, it really should be common knowledge. 

    And yes, same with "dork".  Kind of hard to believe that one is still thrown around. It too, by definition, is a derogatory term. 

    It seems to me that people who throw those terms around either have no experience with people with disabilities or maybe even have disdain for them.  It sucks being disabled.  Why make it harder? (I mean that generally.  I'm not pointing fingers at anyone specifically.)
    I would gather to say that everyone that uses dork or spaz is not targeting the special needs people.  The term restarted wasn't doing that either IMO but because there was a past stigma with those words and people still want to revisit words that have taken on new meanings.

    The term "gypped" as in "gypped me on that price" is a derogatory term or so I have read.  It refers to Gypsies.  They get a lot of flack.

    Anybody feel like starting a thread on this, lol?  Offensive words you didn't know that were?
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    MedozK said:
    mrussel1 said:
    MedozK said:
    mrussel1 said:
    MedozK said:
    @mrussel1, I just picked up 2 very nice VG+++ '75-'77 pressings of Exile and Sticky Fingers. Can't wait to A/B these with the reissues. The Exile is an Artisan plate... was excited to get these. 

    In the same purchase picked up late VG+++ 70s pressings of Animals and Meddle.  All of these from the same seller, crazy good condition.
    That's great!  What happened with that other Exile you found a few weeks ago?
    It is ok, but to much surface noise for me.
    UPDATE ON EXILE!  @MedozK
    Been crazy busy. I am going to take it for an A/B with the 2020 this weekend.

    I have already spun it though, and it is crazy quiet. Sounds really good, but I want to see where it stands listening to both back to back.
    I'm waiting on this too.  Can't wait for the review!
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,495
    Just got in my Vault #52 the Dopesmokers, JW Alive in Heaven and Bright Eyes I'm Wide Awake, It's Morning.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,607
    brianlux said:

    mickeyrat said:
    Merriam-Webster's definition of "spaz":  http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spaz
    I have always thought it to mean this.  Someone high sprung or a goof.  Never have I ever heard the word Spaz used to put down someone with cerebral palsy.
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    New Beyonce album just showed up. yessssssssss

    Not meaning to burst your bubble, Tim, but you might want to check this out first:

    When Beyoncé dropped the same ableist slur as Lizzo on her new album, my heart sank

    Hannah Diviney

    It’s not very often that I don’t know what to say, rendered speechless by ignorance, sadness and a simmering anger born of bone-deep exhaustion. But that’s how I feel right now.

    Six weeks ago I called out American singer, Lizzo, on Twitter for her use of an ableist slur (“spaz”) in a new song. That tweet of mine – which explained how the slur was connected to my disability, cerebral palsy – took me less than five minutes to write and it went viral, landing on the front page of global news outlets including the BBC, New York Times and the Washington Post.

    Lizzo herself even took notice, changing the lyric and giving us all a masterclass in how to be a true and effective ally.

    I thought we’d changed the music industry and started a global conversation about why ableist language – intentional or not – has no place in music. But I guess I was wrong, because now Beyoncé has gone and done exactly the same thing. In fact, she’s used the word “spaz” twice in a new song Heated, a co-write with Canadian rapper Drake off her new album, Renaissance, which dropped on Friday.

    I found out by way of a snarky mention on Twitter asking if I planned to tell Queen Bey to “do better” like I had with Lizzo. My heart sank. Here we were again, but this time the stakes feel higher. Calling this one out is a whole other level.

    Whenever Beyoncé so much as breathes it becomes a cultural moment. She’s often the blueprint for the music industry – with artists and entertainers following her lead. That’s the status she has earned after decades of a career at the top, never making the same move twice, seeming to play in an entirely different league to the majority of the music industry.

    Beyoncé’s commitment to storytelling musically and visually is unparalleled, as is her power to have the world paying attention to the narratives, struggles and nuanced lived experience of being a black woman – a world I can only ever understand as an ally, and have no desire to overshadow.

    But that doesn’t excuse her use of ableist language – language that gets used and ignored all too often. Language you can be sure I will never ignore, no matter who it comes from or what the circumstances are. It doesn’t excuse the fact that the teams of people involved in making this album somehow missed all the noise the disabled community made only six weeks ago when Lizzo did the same thing.

    It doesn’t explain how millions of people have already heard this album and yet aren’t raising the issue, except to make fun of or degrade the disabled community.

    I’m so tired. Disabled people deserve better. I don’t want to have this conversation again.







    Yeah. I heard it in the song last week. It’s a bummer. I’d rather them own it and be better going forward than not doing anything. 

    I'm really hoping she comes around on this one.  And it probably wasn't meant to be derogatory, but how do you tell that to someone with a disability?  She would do well to make amends somehow.  I guess we'll have to wait and see.
    Never heard of it used in that way.  Is this new?

    It's not new to my knowledge, but then in the late 80's I subbed special ed a few times, have personally known Down Syndrome folks, have worked  with people in the disabilities office at our local community college from the late 1990's to early 2000's, volunteered 1,000 hours at our health library, so I might take it for granted that most people know "spaz" is a derogatory term.  To my way of thinking, it really should be common knowledge. 

    And yes, same with "dork".  Kind of hard to believe that one is still thrown around. It too, by definition, is a derogatory term. 

    It seems to me that people who throw those terms around either have no experience with people with disabilities or maybe even have disdain for them.  It sucks being disabled.  Why make it harder? (I mean that generally.  I'm not pointing fingers at anyone specifically.)
    I would gather to say that everyone that uses dork or spaz is not targeting the special needs people.  The term restarted wasn't doing that either IMO but because there was a past stigma with those words and people still want to revisit words that have taken on new meanings.

    The term "gypped" as in "gypped me on that price" is a derogatory term or so I have read.  It refers to Gypsies.  They get a lot of flack.

    Anybody feel like starting a thread on this, lol?  Offensive words you didn't know that were?

    Do doubt you're right that people saying "dork" and "spaz" are not intentionally targeting special needs people... but inadvertently, they are.  Besides, those are words 4th graders, not grown adults.
    In any case, yeah, this needs a different. thread.

    On topic, still waiting for the live Dinosaur Jr pre-order (and actually glad to let my ears settle down after seeing The Dream Syndicate show).  That Dino LP should be excellent!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











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