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The coronavirus

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  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 11,985
    It’s funny how the right seizes on a handful of instances of deaths purportedly misattributed to covid while also blaming all deaths after vaccination on the vaccine. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 5,826
    23scidoo said:

    I only have the patience to debunk one conspiracy theory a day, so for today it's this one, since it's a particularly ridiculous yet dangerous one.

    In the "study" this article describes, the authors compared two groups - those over 65 who died at some point in the weeks after getting a covid vaccine, and those over 65 who died of covid. The first number is larger than the second, so they concluded that more over-65s died of the vaccine than of covid. 

    It should be immediately obvious what is wrong with that conclusion - dying after you get a particular vaccine does not equate to dying because you got that particular vaccine. People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things. 

    The correct comparators would be all-cause mortality in people over 65 who got the vaccine and those who didn't, matched for comparable health status, age, sex, etc. 

    Given their comment about "long term side effects", the authors are obviously setting this up to later claim that every death after vaccine is a vaccine-related death, no matter how long after. 
    Do you take requests? Can you do this one next?
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8314941/elvis-presley-alive-preaching-arkansas-pastor-conspiracy-theory/
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 23,468
    View in browser|nytimes.com

     
    March 4, 2021

      By David Leonhardt


    Good morning. How should you think about the Johnson & Johnson vaccine? We explain.




     

    A woman hugging her daughter after receiving the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in Columbus, Ohio, this week.Gaelen Morse/Reuters

    ‘Breathtaking’ results

    It’s the latest case of vaccine alarmism.

    Many Americans are worried that Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine is an inferior product that may not be worth getting. Gov. Doug Burgum of North Dakota recently told The Washington Post that he was now seeing not only “vaccine hesitancy” but also “the potential for brand hesitancy.”

    The perception stems from the headline rates of effectiveness of the three vaccines: 72 percent for Johnson & Johnson, compared with 94 percent for Moderna and 95 percent for Pfizer. But those headline rates can be misleading in a few ways.
    The most important measure — whether the vaccine prevents serious illness — shows the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to be equally effective as the other two. All work for nearly 100 percent of people. The picture is murkier for mild cases, but they are not particularly worrisome.

    Today, I want to unpack the statistics about the three vaccines and explain why the current perception is a problem.
    I’ll start with an anecdote that this newsletter has included once before: Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious-disease expert at Vanderbilt University, was recently talking with some colleagues about what they would tell a family member who could choose between getting the Johnson & Johnson tomorrow and one of the other vaccines in three weeks.

    “All of us said, ‘Get the one tomorrow,’” as Schaffner recounted to my colleague Denise Grady. “The virus is bad.”
    Mild Covid means victory

    The headline effectiveness numbers — like 72 percent — describe a vaccine’s ability to prevent all infections from this coronavirus, known as SARS-Cov-2. But preventing all infections is less important than it may sound. The world is not going to eliminate SARS-Cov-2 anytime soon. Coronaviruses circulate all the time, causing the common cold and other manageable illnesses.
    The trouble with this virus is its lethality. It has killed 15 times as many Americans as an average flu season. Turning Covid into something more like a mild flu or common cold means victory over the pandemic.

    All three vaccines being used in the U.S. are accomplishing that goal. In the research trials, none of the people who received a vaccine died of Covid. And after the vaccines had taken full effect, none were hospitalized, either.
    In the real world, the vaccines won’t achieve quite as stellar outcomes. Still, the results are excellent — and equally excellent across the three, as Dr. Cody Meissner of the Tufts School of Medicine said during a recent F.D.A. meeting.


    Like running into the wind
    But why doesn’t Johnson & Johnson appear to be as good at preventing mild illness?

    There are a few possible answers. For one, Johnson & Johnson’s research trials seem to have had a greater degree of difficulty. They occurred later than Moderna’s or Pfizer’s — after one of the virus variants had spread more widely. The variant appears to cause a greater number of mild Covid cases among vaccinated people than the original virus.
    Second, Johnson & Johnson is currently only one shot, while Moderna and Pfizer are two shots. That happened mostly because of how strong the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is. Initial testing showed it to deliver impressive levels of immunity after only one shot, while the others required a booster, as Dr. Robert Wachter, chair of the department of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, explained to me.

    The truth is that all of the vaccines seem to provide significant protection after a single shot. (Look at Britain, which is not rushing to give second shots and where cases and deaths continue to plummet.) Similarly, all three vaccines may benefit from a second shot.
    I recognize that may make some people anxious about getting the single Johnson & Johnson shot, but it shouldn’t. If further data suggest that a second Johnson & Johnson shot would help, regulators can change their recommendation. Regardless, follow-up Covid shots may be normal in the future.

    What’s the bottom line? A single Johnson & Johnson shot may indeed allow a somewhat larger number of mild Covid cases than two shots of Moderna or Pfizer. It’s hard to be sure. And it isn’t very important.
    “The number that we should all truly care about is what are the chances I’m going to get this thing and get really sick or die,” Wachter said. After any of the three vaccines, he added, “There’s essentially no chance you will die of Covid, which is breathtaking.”

     

    Gov. Kim Reynolds of Iowa received the Johnson & Johnson virus vaccine yesterday.Zach Boyden-Holmes/The Des Moines Register, via Associated Press

    A final thought

    Like most Americans, I have not yet been vaccinated. As I looked into the differences among the vaccines, I’ll confess that I had a self-involved thought: Maybe the overwrought concern about Johnson & Johnson means that its shots will go begging — and I will be able to get one sooner.
    If so, I will say yes, without hesitation, and feel relieved.

    In the meantime, I’d offer this advice to anybody ahead of me in line: If your turn comes and you are offered the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, accept what is rightfully yours. Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the just as good.
    In Iowa yesterday: Gov. Kim Reynolds and the state’s public health director, Kelly Garcia, received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine during a news conference. “I’m very happy to have received it,” the governor said, “and would just once again encourage Iowans, when you get the opportunity, please take advantage of it.”


    THE LATEST NEWS
    THE VIRUS

    • The U.S. has administered more than two million vaccine shots per day over the past week.
    • President Biden called decisions by the governors of Texas and Mississippi to lift mask mandates “Neanderthal thinking.”
    • New York will allow live performances again next month, with masks and reduced capacity.
    • A college president was worried about the effects of dorm isolation on students. So he moved in.
    • The Indian drug company Bharat Biotech said that initial results from clinical trials showed its coronavirus vaccine to be safe and effective.




    Shit, I want the J&J shot - let the fucking dodos get out of line and I can get it that much faster.
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • PoncierPoncier Posts: 12,168
    mace1229 said:
    23scidoo said:

    I only have the patience to debunk one conspiracy theory a day, so for today it's this one, since it's a particularly ridiculous yet dangerous one.

    In the "study" this article describes, the authors compared two groups - those over 65 who died at some point in the weeks after getting a covid vaccine, and those over 65 who died of covid. The first number is larger than the second, so they concluded that more over-65s died of the vaccine than of covid. 

    It should be immediately obvious what is wrong with that conclusion - dying after you get a particular vaccine does not equate to dying because you got that particular vaccine. People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things. 

    The correct comparators would be all-cause mortality in people over 65 who got the vaccine and those who didn't, matched for comparable health status, age, sex, etc. 

    Given their comment about "long term side effects", the authors are obviously setting this up to later claim that every death after vaccine is a vaccine-related death, no matter how long after. 
    Do you take requests? Can you do this one next?
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8314941/elvis-presley-alive-preaching-arkansas-pastor-conspiracy-theory/
    That one can't be debunked.
    This weekend we rock Portland
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,200
    1 to 4..not bad..
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018.
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.
  • lastexitlondonlastexitlondon Posts: 7,137
    View in browser|nytimes.com

     
    March 4, 2021

      By David Leonhardt


    Good morning. How should you think about the Johnson & Johnson vaccine? We explain.




     

    A woman hugging her daughter after receiving the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in Columbus, Ohio, this week.Gaelen Morse/Reuters

    ‘Breathtaking’ results

    It’s the latest case of vaccine alarmism.

    Many Americans are worried that Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine is an inferior product that may not be worth getting. Gov. Doug Burgum of North Dakota recently told The Washington Post that he was now seeing not only “vaccine hesitancy” but also “the potential for brand hesitancy.”

    The perception stems from the headline rates of effectiveness of the three vaccines: 72 percent for Johnson & Johnson, compared with 94 percent for Moderna and 95 percent for Pfizer. But those headline rates can be misleading in a few ways.
    The most important measure — whether the vaccine prevents serious illness — shows the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to be equally effective as the other two. All work for nearly 100 percent of people. The picture is murkier for mild cases, but they are not particularly worrisome.

    Today, I want to unpack the statistics about the three vaccines and explain why the current perception is a problem.
    I’ll start with an anecdote that this newsletter has included once before: Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious-disease expert at Vanderbilt University, was recently talking with some colleagues about what they would tell a family member who could choose between getting the Johnson & Johnson tomorrow and one of the other vaccines in three weeks.

    “All of us said, ‘Get the one tomorrow,’” as Schaffner recounted to my colleague Denise Grady. “The virus is bad.”
    Mild Covid means victory

    The headline effectiveness numbers — like 72 percent — describe a vaccine’s ability to prevent all infections from this coronavirus, known as SARS-Cov-2. But preventing all infections is less important than it may sound. The world is not going to eliminate SARS-Cov-2 anytime soon. Coronaviruses circulate all the time, causing the common cold and other manageable illnesses.
    The trouble with this virus is its lethality. It has killed 15 times as many Americans as an average flu season. Turning Covid into something more like a mild flu or common cold means victory over the pandemic.

    All three vaccines being used in the U.S. are accomplishing that goal. In the research trials, none of the people who received a vaccine died of Covid. And after the vaccines had taken full effect, none were hospitalized, either.
    In the real world, the vaccines won’t achieve quite as stellar outcomes. Still, the results are excellent — and equally excellent across the three, as Dr. Cody Meissner of the Tufts School of Medicine said during a recent F.D.A. meeting.


    Like running into the wind
    But why doesn’t Johnson & Johnson appear to be as good at preventing mild illness?

    There are a few possible answers. For one, Johnson & Johnson’s research trials seem to have had a greater degree of difficulty. They occurred later than Moderna’s or Pfizer’s — after one of the virus variants had spread more widely. The variant appears to cause a greater number of mild Covid cases among vaccinated people than the original virus.
    Second, Johnson & Johnson is currently only one shot, while Moderna and Pfizer are two shots. That happened mostly because of how strong the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is. Initial testing showed it to deliver impressive levels of immunity after only one shot, while the others required a booster, as Dr. Robert Wachter, chair of the department of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, explained to me.

    The truth is that all of the vaccines seem to provide significant protection after a single shot. (Look at Britain, which is not rushing to give second shots and where cases and deaths continue to plummet.) Similarly, all three vaccines may benefit from a second shot.
    I recognize that may make some people anxious about getting the single Johnson & Johnson shot, but it shouldn’t. If further data suggest that a second Johnson & Johnson shot would help, regulators can change their recommendation. Regardless, follow-up Covid shots may be normal in the future.

    What’s the bottom line? A single Johnson & Johnson shot may indeed allow a somewhat larger number of mild Covid cases than two shots of Moderna or Pfizer. It’s hard to be sure. And it isn’t very important.
    “The number that we should all truly care about is what are the chances I’m going to get this thing and get really sick or die,” Wachter said. After any of the three vaccines, he added, “There’s essentially no chance you will die of Covid, which is breathtaking.”

     

    Gov. Kim Reynolds of Iowa received the Johnson & Johnson virus vaccine yesterday.Zach Boyden-Holmes/The Des Moines Register, via Associated Press

    A final thought

    Like most Americans, I have not yet been vaccinated. As I looked into the differences among the vaccines, I’ll confess that I had a self-involved thought: Maybe the overwrought concern about Johnson & Johnson means that its shots will go begging — and I will be able to get one sooner.
    If so, I will say yes, without hesitation, and feel relieved.

    In the meantime, I’d offer this advice to anybody ahead of me in line: If your turn comes and you are offered the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, accept what is rightfully yours. Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the just as good.
    In Iowa yesterday: Gov. Kim Reynolds and the state’s public health director, Kelly Garcia, received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine during a news conference. “I’m very happy to have received it,” the governor said, “and would just once again encourage Iowans, when you get the opportunity, please take advantage of it.”


    THE LATEST NEWS
    THE VIRUS

    • The U.S. has administered more than two million vaccine shots per day over the past week.
    • President Biden called decisions by the governors of Texas and Mississippi to lift mask mandates “Neanderthal thinking.”
    • New York will allow live performances again next month, with masks and reduced capacity.
    • A college president was worried about the effects of dorm isolation on students. So he moved in.
    • The Indian drug company Bharat Biotech said that initial results from clinical trials showed its coronavirus vaccine to be safe and effective.




    Shit, I want the J&J shot - let the fucking dodos get out of line and I can get it that much faster.
    Exactly.  
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    this song is meant to be called i got shit,itshould be called i got shit tickets-hartford 06 -
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,200
    23scidoo said:

    I only have the patience to debunk one conspiracy theory a day, so for today it's this one, since it's a particularly ridiculous yet dangerous one.

    In the "study" this article describes, the authors compared two groups - those over 65 who died at some point in the weeks after getting a covid vaccine, and those over 65 who died of covid. The first number is larger than the second, so they concluded that more over-65s died of the vaccine than of covid. 

    It should be immediately obvious what is wrong with that conclusion - dying after you get a particular vaccine does not equate to dying because you got that particular vaccine. People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things. 

    The correct comparators would be all-cause mortality in people over 65 who got the vaccine and those who didn't, matched for comparable health status, age, sex, etc. 

    Given their comment about "long term side effects", the authors are obviously setting this up to later claim that every death after vaccine is a vaccine-related death, no matter how long after. 
    ''People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things''..
    Have you heard any other cause of death lately??
    Here, everybody die from covid..
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018.
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,200
    And to be clear for good, i'm not against the vaccine..
    but i just don't believe 100% what the news said..
    i know doctors said, they are not sure for the vaccine..
    how can i or can you??..
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018.
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 11,985
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:

    I only have the patience to debunk one conspiracy theory a day, so for today it's this one, since it's a particularly ridiculous yet dangerous one.

    In the "study" this article describes, the authors compared two groups - those over 65 who died at some point in the weeks after getting a covid vaccine, and those over 65 who died of covid. The first number is larger than the second, so they concluded that more over-65s died of the vaccine than of covid. 

    It should be immediately obvious what is wrong with that conclusion - dying after you get a particular vaccine does not equate to dying because you got that particular vaccine. People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things. 

    The correct comparators would be all-cause mortality in people over 65 who got the vaccine and those who didn't, matched for comparable health status, age, sex, etc. 

    Given their comment about "long term side effects", the authors are obviously setting this up to later claim that every death after vaccine is a vaccine-related death, no matter how long after. 
    ''People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things''..
    Have you heard any other cause of death lately??
    Here, everybody die from covid..
    Why yes, I have heard of other causes of death. Could be because I work in a hospital, but that’s likely a minor point. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 11,985
    mace1229 said:
    23scidoo said:

    I only have the patience to debunk one conspiracy theory a day, so for today it's this one, since it's a particularly ridiculous yet dangerous one.

    In the "study" this article describes, the authors compared two groups - those over 65 who died at some point in the weeks after getting a covid vaccine, and those over 65 who died of covid. The first number is larger than the second, so they concluded that more over-65s died of the vaccine than of covid. 

    It should be immediately obvious what is wrong with that conclusion - dying after you get a particular vaccine does not equate to dying because you got that particular vaccine. People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things. 

    The correct comparators would be all-cause mortality in people over 65 who got the vaccine and those who didn't, matched for comparable health status, age, sex, etc. 

    Given their comment about "long term side effects", the authors are obviously setting this up to later claim that every death after vaccine is a vaccine-related death, no matter how long after. 
    Do you take requests? Can you do this one next?
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8314941/elvis-presley-alive-preaching-arkansas-pastor-conspiracy-theory/
    I do take requests, but I don’t keep a waiting list. Ask me again tomorrow. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,200
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:

    I only have the patience to debunk one conspiracy theory a day, so for today it's this one, since it's a particularly ridiculous yet dangerous one.

    In the "study" this article describes, the authors compared two groups - those over 65 who died at some point in the weeks after getting a covid vaccine, and those over 65 who died of covid. The first number is larger than the second, so they concluded that more over-65s died of the vaccine than of covid. 

    It should be immediately obvious what is wrong with that conclusion - dying after you get a particular vaccine does not equate to dying because you got that particular vaccine. People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things. 

    The correct comparators would be all-cause mortality in people over 65 who got the vaccine and those who didn't, matched for comparable health status, age, sex, etc. 

    Given their comment about "long term side effects", the authors are obviously setting this up to later claim that every death after vaccine is a vaccine-related death, no matter how long after. 
    ''People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things''..
    Have you heard any other cause of death lately??
    Here, everybody die from covid..
    Why yes, I have heard of other causes of death. Could be because I work in a hospital, but that’s likely a minor point. 
    Not here..
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018.
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 11,985
    23scidoo said:
    And to be clear for good, i'm not against the vaccine..
    but i just don't believe 100% what the news said..
    i know doctors said, they are not sure for the vaccine..
    how can i or can you??..
    If you’re not against the vaccine, maybe consider not posting links from shitty, anti-science,  antivaxxer sites 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 6,114
    edited March 4
    23scidoo said:
    And to be clear for good, i'm not against the vaccine..
    but i just don't believe 100% what the news said..
    i know doctors said, they are not sure for the vaccine..
    how can i or can you??..
    It is perfectly fine to be skeptical of news reports, but that statement gets invalidated when you post a link from a media source that is a known offender of spreading false vaccination information.  
    Personally, I distrust the media too, but I try and put extra scrutiny on vetting sources that make huge claims like the one you posted saying that the vaccines are killing more than the virus.  A SIMPLE google search on that sources reputation leads one to see that the claim is most likely false.
    Why would you choose to pick that one out of the many proven trustworthy sources stating otherwise?
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 6,114
    23scidoo said:
    And to be clear for good, i'm not against the vaccine..
    but i just don't believe 100% what the news said..
    i know doctors said, they are not sure for the vaccine..
    how can i or can you??..
    If you’re not against the vaccine, maybe consider not posting links from shitty, anti-science,  antivaxxer sites 
    Exactly
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,200
    23scidoo said:
    And to be clear for good, i'm not against the vaccine..
    but i just don't believe 100% what the news said..
    i know doctors said, they are not sure for the vaccine..
    how can i or can you??..
    If you’re not against the vaccine, maybe consider not posting links from shitty, anti-science,  antivaxxer sites 

    People can believe and comment as they wish..i have see that lot of times here..anyway..
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018.
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 11,985
    edited March 4
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:
    And to be clear for good, i'm not against the vaccine..
    but i just don't believe 100% what the news said..
    i know doctors said, they are not sure for the vaccine..
    how can i or can you??..
    If you’re not against the vaccine, maybe consider not posting links from shitty, anti-science,  antivaxxer sites 

    People can believe and comment as they wish..i have see that lot of times here..anyway..
    Of course you can comment as you wish, but if you wish those comments to be taken seriously, then consider your sources. 

    Deliberately spreading misinformation and falsehoods is not a great look. 
    Post edited by oftenreading on
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 8,203

  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 17,388
    edited March 4
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:

    I only have the patience to debunk one conspiracy theory a day, so for today it's this one, since it's a particularly ridiculous yet dangerous one.

    In the "study" this article describes, the authors compared two groups - those over 65 who died at some point in the weeks after getting a covid vaccine, and those over 65 who died of covid. The first number is larger than the second, so they concluded that more over-65s died of the vaccine than of covid. 

    It should be immediately obvious what is wrong with that conclusion - dying after you get a particular vaccine does not equate to dying because you got that particular vaccine. People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things. 

    The correct comparators would be all-cause mortality in people over 65 who got the vaccine and those who didn't, matched for comparable health status, age, sex, etc. 

    Given their comment about "long term side effects", the authors are obviously setting this up to later claim that every death after vaccine is a vaccine-related death, no matter how long after. 
    ''People die of lots of things, and people over 65 die at a higher rate of lots of things''..
    Have you heard any other cause of death lately??
    Here, everybody die from covid..
    Why yes, I have heard of other causes of death. Could be because I work in a hospital, but that’s likely a minor point. 
    Not here..
    I've known/been acquainted with four people who have died during the pandemic, none of whom have died from Covid-19: cancer, cancer, stroke, accident.

    Greece is really reporting every death as a Covid-19 death? 
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • cincybearcatcincybearcat Posts: 14,784
    Greece data for 2020 (https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/country-health-profile/greece)... is this accurate?

    Coronary Heart Disease
    27,002
    Stroke
    18,167
    Lung Cancers
    8,804
    Lung Disease
    7,774
    Influenza and Pneumonia
    7,577
    COVID-19
    6,597
    Kidney Disease
    3,905
    Colon-Rectum Cancers
    3,796
    Breast Cancer
    2,884
    Alzheimers & Dementia
    2,439
    Prostate Cancer
    2,396
    Hypertension
    2,268
    Pancreas Cancer
    2,222
    Upper Respiratory
    2,134
    Diabetes Mellitus
    2,069
    Liver Cancer
    1,878
    Stomach Cancer
    1,873
    Bladder Cancer
    1,765
    Parkinson's Disease
    1,718
    Leukemia
    1,634
    Lymphomas
    1,526
    Encephalitis
    1,164
    Road Traffic Accidents
    1,103
    Liver Disease
    1,032
    Endocrine Disorders
    728
    Peptic Ulcer Disease
    681
    hippiemom = goodness
  • cincybearcatcincybearcat Posts: 14,784
    5.7% of deaths in 2020 in greece were Covid if that is accurate?
    hippiemom = goodness
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 17,388
    Certainly seems more accurate than 100%.
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,200
    Nobody talking for nothing else..
    Post it the other day, people going to hospitals for other reasons, died, and the name it as a covid death..
    It's the reality here..
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018.
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,200
    Sorry, i just i remember someone who hasn't die from covid.. my mother's second husband..
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018.
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,200
    5.7% of deaths in 2020 in greece were Covid if that is accurate?
    And by your logic is that a reason to have the whole country in lockdown for almost a year now, thousand of people without job or sitting at their homes unable to work and live with 534 Euros per month and couple of dozens stupid "laws" for a year now??
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018.
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.
  • cincybearcatcincybearcat Posts: 14,784
    23scidoo said:
    5.7% of deaths in 2020 in greece were Covid if that is accurate?
    And by your logic is that a reason to have the whole country in lockdown for almost a year now, thousand of people without job or sitting at their homes unable to work and live with 534 Euros per month and couple of dozens stupid "laws" for a year now??
    BY my logic?  I was just answering the question about % of covid deaths.  You were wrong and now trying to change the subject.  I never said anything about lockdowns, especially in greece.
    hippiemom = goodness
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,335
    23scidoo said:
    5.7% of deaths in 2020 in greece were Covid if that is accurate?
    And by your logic is that a reason to have the whole country in lockdown for almost a year now, thousand of people without job or sitting at their homes unable to work and live with 534 Euros per month and couple of dozens stupid "laws" for a year now??
    BY my logic?  I was just answering the question about % of covid deaths.  You were wrong and now trying to change the subject.  I never said anything about lockdowns, especially in greece.

    So these lockdowns were your idea, Cincy? 

    Thanks a lot. 


  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 17,388
    edited March 4
    23scidoo said:
    5.7% of deaths in 2020 in greece were Covid if that is accurate?
    And by your logic is that a reason to have the whole country in lockdown for almost a year now, thousand of people without job or sitting at their homes unable to work and live with 534 Euros per month and couple of dozens stupid "laws" for a year now??
    BY my logic?  I was just answering the question about % of covid deaths.  You were wrong and now trying to change the subject.  I never said anything about lockdowns, especially in greece.

    So these lockdowns were your idea, Cincy? 

    Thanks a lot. 

    Putting you on ignore, cincy, you bastard.
    Post edited by dankind on
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • cincybearcatcincybearcat Posts: 14,784
    dankind said:
    23scidoo said:
    5.7% of deaths in 2020 in greece were Covid if that is accurate?
    And by your logic is that a reason to have the whole country in lockdown for almost a year now, thousand of people without job or sitting at their homes unable to work and live with 534 Euros per month and couple of dozens stupid "laws" for a year now??
    BY my logic?  I was just answering the question about % of covid deaths.  You were wrong and now trying to change the subject.  I never said anything about lockdowns, especially in greece.

    So these lockdowns were your idea, Cincy? 

    Thanks a lot. 

    Putting you on ignore, cincy, you bastard.
    Can't argue with that decision.
    hippiemom = goodness
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 11,985
    So what I’m hearing is that if we all put cincy on ignore COVID goes away? Do I have that right? 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 17,388
    So what I’m hearing is that if we all put cincy on ignore COVID goes away? Do I have that right? 
    Yes. 

    Debunk THAT!
    I SAW PEARL JAM
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