Is technology taking over our lives?!?

15678911»

Comments

  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,299
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    it's hilariously over the top. 

    I've never used one, and I can't imagine how long I'd have to sit there waiting for everything to be sufficiently dry. 
    Well, that one has a dryer built in.  If it's a Dyson dryer, you'll be good to go in time...lol
    I saw that, I just can't see it being high powered enough for my comfort level. HAHA
    Headstones and Watchmen Fan Boy
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,273
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    it's hilariously over the top. 

    I've never used one, and I can't imagine how long I'd have to sit there waiting for everything to be sufficiently dry. 
    Well, that one has a dryer built in.  If it's a Dyson dryer, you'll be good to go in time...lol
    I saw that, I just can't see it being high powered enough for my comfort level. HAHA
    I get you on that.  I just it was funny.  I'll stick with old fashion crapper.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,449
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    it's hilariously over the top. 

    I've never used one, and I can't imagine how long I'd have to sit there waiting for everything to be sufficiently dry. 
    Well, that one has a dryer built in.  If it's a Dyson dryer, you'll be good to go in time...lol
    I saw that, I just can't see it being high powered enough for my comfort level. HAHA
    You've used those dyson hand dryers though, right? You'd be blown off the seat.
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,299
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    it's hilariously over the top. 

    I've never used one, and I can't imagine how long I'd have to sit there waiting for everything to be sufficiently dry. 
    Well, that one has a dryer built in.  If it's a Dyson dryer, you'll be good to go in time...lol
    I saw that, I just can't see it being high powered enough for my comfort level. HAHA
    You've used those dyson hand dryers though, right? You'd be blown off the seat.
    no kidding. I don't want that either. I just don't think there would be a good middle ground here. LOL
    Headstones and Watchmen Fan Boy
  • benjsbenjs Toronto, ONPosts: 7,876
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    '05 - TO, '06 - TO 1, '08 - NYC 1 & 2, '09 - TO, Chi 1 & 2, '10 - Buffalo, NYC 1 & 2, '11 - TO 1 & 2, Hamilton, '13 - Buffalo, Brooklyn 1 & 2, '15 - Global Citizen, '16 - TO 1 & 2, Chi 2

    EV
    Toronto Film Festival 9/11/2007, '08 - Toronto 1 & 2, '09 - Albany 1, '11 - Chicago 1
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,554
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    Interesting, Ben.  And I hope your visit was before the nuclear power plant melt-down, not after.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • benjsbenjs Toronto, ONPosts: 7,876
    brianlux said:
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    Interesting, Ben.  And I hope your visit was before the nuclear power plant melt-down, not after.
    It was last year, but the impact of the meltdown doesn't spread that far thankfully. 
    '05 - TO, '06 - TO 1, '08 - NYC 1 & 2, '09 - TO, Chi 1 & 2, '10 - Buffalo, NYC 1 & 2, '11 - TO 1 & 2, Hamilton, '13 - Buffalo, Brooklyn 1 & 2, '15 - Global Citizen, '16 - TO 1 & 2, Chi 2

    EV
    Toronto Film Festival 9/11/2007, '08 - Toronto 1 & 2, '09 - Albany 1, '11 - Chicago 1
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,554
    benjs said:
    brianlux said:
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    Interesting, Ben.  And I hope your visit was before the nuclear power plant melt-down, not after.
    It was last year, but the impact of the meltdown doesn't spread that far thankfully. 
    Good to know!  I'm fascinated by Japanese culture.  My girl friend in high school had parents who were born in Japan and were detained in a camp in WWII.  I learned a lot from her but there is so much more!
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    That is awesome.
    Yes, the Japanese are full of good ideas, and they actually follow through with them.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,449
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    I used to have Japanese neighbours in my former neighbourhood. Although they had been in Canada for decades, they kept some Japanese traditions, including have a fantastic (and fantastically expensive, I assume) toilet that did all of what that bidet did and more, along with music or a variety of different sounds. It was a little frightening to the unitiated - I couldn't even figure out how to flush it the first time I was invited over to their house :lol:
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    I used to have Japanese neighbours in my former neighbourhood. Although they had been in Canada for decades, they kept some Japanese traditions, including have a fantastic (and fantastically expensive, I assume) toilet that did all of what that bidet did and more, along with music or a variety of different sounds. It was a little frightening to the unitiated - I couldn't even figure out how to flush it the first time I was invited over to their house :lol:
    I really really wish toilets like this would come to mainstream Canada. Our toilets are so boring. And I really do like this sound-making idea. Not having that puts so many people into such awkward and/or unpleasant situations. I really really hate it when someone comes to my house and had a diarrhea shit in my bathroom and I'm hearing every awful minute of it in my living room. And you know how insanely embarrassed they are in there. Sometimes they try to run the faucet and cover the noise with the fan, but it doesn't work at all. :lol:
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 19,988
    PJ_Soul said:
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    I used to have Japanese neighbours in my former neighbourhood. Although they had been in Canada for decades, they kept some Japanese traditions, including have a fantastic (and fantastically expensive, I assume) toilet that did all of what that bidet did and more, along with music or a variety of different sounds. It was a little frightening to the unitiated - I couldn't even figure out how to flush it the first time I was invited over to their house :lol:
    I really really wish toilets like this would come to mainstream Canada. Our toilets are so boring. And I really do like this sound-making idea. Not having that puts so many people into such awkward and/or unpleasant situations. I really really hate it when someone comes to my house and had a diarrhea shit in my bathroom and I'm hearing every awful minute of it in my living room. And you know how insanely embarrassed they are in there. Sometimes they try to run the faucet and cover the noise with the fan, but it doesn't work at all. :lol:
    No buffer zone! Every home needs one. 
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    edited February 13
    hedonist said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    I used to have Japanese neighbours in my former neighbourhood. Although they had been in Canada for decades, they kept some Japanese traditions, including have a fantastic (and fantastically expensive, I assume) toilet that did all of what that bidet did and more, along with music or a variety of different sounds. It was a little frightening to the unitiated - I couldn't even figure out how to flush it the first time I was invited over to their house :lol:
    I really really wish toilets like this would come to mainstream Canada. Our toilets are so boring. And I really do like this sound-making idea. Not having that puts so many people into such awkward and/or unpleasant situations. I really really hate it when someone comes to my house and had a diarrhea shit in my bathroom and I'm hearing every awful minute of it in my living room. And you know how insanely embarrassed they are in there. Sometimes they try to run the faucet and cover the noise with the fan, but it doesn't work at all. :lol:
    No buffer zone! Every home needs one. 
    It is pretty hard when you live in an open concept one bedroom apartment! The washroom isn't actually right off my living room, but it's still only about 20 feet from it, lol!
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,449
    PJ_Soul said:
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    I used to have Japanese neighbours in my former neighbourhood. Although they had been in Canada for decades, they kept some Japanese traditions, including have a fantastic (and fantastically expensive, I assume) toilet that did all of what that bidet did and more, along with music or a variety of different sounds. It was a little frightening to the unitiated - I couldn't even figure out how to flush it the first time I was invited over to their house :lol:
    I really really wish toilets like this would come to mainstream Canada. Our toilets are so boring. And I really do like this sound-making idea. Not having that puts so many people into such awkward and/or unpleasant situations. I really really hate it when someone comes to my house and had a diarrhea shit in my bathroom and I'm hearing every awful minute of it in my living room. And you know how insanely embarrassed they are in there. Sometimes they try to run the faucet and cover the noise with the fan, but it doesn't work at all. :lol:

    I've read, though i can't confirm, that Japanese women are so embarrassed by the fact that they are functioning biological beings that if they don't have access to this sort of noise-generating toilet they just repeatedly flush, to cover up even more typical bathroom noises. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    PJ_Soul said:
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    I used to have Japanese neighbours in my former neighbourhood. Although they had been in Canada for decades, they kept some Japanese traditions, including have a fantastic (and fantastically expensive, I assume) toilet that did all of what that bidet did and more, along with music or a variety of different sounds. It was a little frightening to the unitiated - I couldn't even figure out how to flush it the first time I was invited over to their house :lol:
    I really really wish toilets like this would come to mainstream Canada. Our toilets are so boring. And I really do like this sound-making idea. Not having that puts so many people into such awkward and/or unpleasant situations. I really really hate it when someone comes to my house and had a diarrhea shit in my bathroom and I'm hearing every awful minute of it in my living room. And you know how insanely embarrassed they are in there. Sometimes they try to run the faucet and cover the noise with the fan, but it doesn't work at all. :lol:

    I've read, though i can't confirm, that Japanese women are so embarrassed by the fact that they are functioning biological beings that if they don't have access to this sort of noise-generating toilet they just repeatedly flush, to cover up even more typical bathroom noises. 
    I don't think North American women are any different TBH. Many women will sit in a public washroom and hold it until nobody is in there, even if it takes 15 minutes for the place to clear out, lol. Everyone always knows it too. The still silence that comes out of a stall containing a woman waiting desperately to shit is the most silent silence in the world. :lol:
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • benjsbenjs Toronto, ONPosts: 7,876
    PJ_Soul said:
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    I used to have Japanese neighbours in my former neighbourhood. Although they had been in Canada for decades, they kept some Japanese traditions, including have a fantastic (and fantastically expensive, I assume) toilet that did all of what that bidet did and more, along with music or a variety of different sounds. It was a little frightening to the unitiated - I couldn't even figure out how to flush it the first time I was invited over to their house :lol:
    I really really wish toilets like this would come to mainstream Canada. Our toilets are so boring. And I really do like this sound-making idea. Not having that puts so many people into such awkward and/or unpleasant situations. I really really hate it when someone comes to my house and had a diarrhea shit in my bathroom and I'm hearing every awful minute of it in my living room. And you know how insanely embarrassed they are in there. Sometimes they try to run the faucet and cover the noise with the fan, but it doesn't work at all. :lol:

    I've read, though i can't confirm, that Japanese women are so embarrassed by the fact that they are functioning biological beings that if they don't have access to this sort of noise-generating toilet they just repeatedly flush, to cover up even more typical bathroom noises. 
    At least anecdotally I heard that in Japan as well. On the topic of figuring out how to flush - there are so many buttons on some of these toilets it's absolutely astonishing (and of course all in Japanese). Rinsing pressure options, choosing between 'front and rear', song choices, some of them even have glowing light options, how hot you want the drying function. On the topic of boring toilets, keep in mind that the toilets themselves are usually standard, and then you just buy a digital toilet seat that has those features. So PJ_Soul, if you so desire, you too could have your very own butt-rinsing, song-singing Toto toilet too!
    '05 - TO, '06 - TO 1, '08 - NYC 1 & 2, '09 - TO, Chi 1 & 2, '10 - Buffalo, NYC 1 & 2, '11 - TO 1 & 2, Hamilton, '13 - Buffalo, Brooklyn 1 & 2, '15 - Global Citizen, '16 - TO 1 & 2, Chi 2

    EV
    Toronto Film Festival 9/11/2007, '08 - Toronto 1 & 2, '09 - Albany 1, '11 - Chicago 1
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,528
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    benjs said:
    It's an overwrought commercial, but it's just a bidet for god's sake; it's not like they're anything new. The Japanese have had similarly involved machines for years as part of their societal views on cleanliness, body odours and noises. 
    It's true. When I went to Japan, I visited a Japanese family in the remote countryside in Fukuoka Prefecture, and even there the toilet still drowned out my noises with various elevator music tracks to choose from. Fascinating culture!
    I used to have Japanese neighbours in my former neighbourhood. Although they had been in Canada for decades, they kept some Japanese traditions, including have a fantastic (and fantastically expensive, I assume) toilet that did all of what that bidet did and more, along with music or a variety of different sounds. It was a little frightening to the unitiated - I couldn't even figure out how to flush it the first time I was invited over to their house :lol:
    I really really wish toilets like this would come to mainstream Canada. Our toilets are so boring. And I really do like this sound-making idea. Not having that puts so many people into such awkward and/or unpleasant situations. I really really hate it when someone comes to my house and had a diarrhea shit in my bathroom and I'm hearing every awful minute of it in my living room. And you know how insanely embarrassed they are in there. Sometimes they try to run the faucet and cover the noise with the fan, but it doesn't work at all. :lol:

    I've read, though i can't confirm, that Japanese women are so embarrassed by the fact that they are functioning biological beings that if they don't have access to this sort of noise-generating toilet they just repeatedly flush, to cover up even more typical bathroom noises. 
    I don't think North American women are any different TBH. Many women will sit in a public washroom and hold it until nobody is in there, even if it takes 15 minutes for the place to clear out, lol. Everyone always knows it too. The still silence that comes out of a stall containing a woman waiting desperately to shit is the most silent silence in the world. :lol:
    OMG I laughed so hard at this, lol!!!!!
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,554
    If what this article says is true for many people, it is proof positive that technology is taking over our lives- or more accurately stated,  that many people are allowing technology to take over their lives:


    The article does make a good point about how interconnected many on-line sites are, but to say it is "almost impossible to function with the five big tech giants"?  That says a lot about how humans today function as well as about how pathetically poorly many would function in an all out power grid shut down lasting more than a few days.  Our species has become rather delicate and weak.


    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,528
    brianlux said:
    If what this article says is true for many people, it is proof positive that technology is taking over our lives- or more accurately stated,  that many people are allowing technology to take over their lives:


    The article does make a good point about how interconnected many on-line sites are, but to say it is "almost impossible to function with the five big tech giants"?  That says a lot about how humans today function as well as about how pathetically poorly many would function in an all out power grid shut down lasting more than a few days.  Our species has become rather delicate and weak.


    I saw this first hand during Sandy here in NY.  The level of incompetence by people, first responders, and voted officials following the aftermath was just mind blowing.


  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,554
    brianlux said:
    If what this article says is true for many people, it is proof positive that technology is taking over our lives- or more accurately stated,  that many people are allowing technology to take over their lives:


    The article does make a good point about how interconnected many on-line sites are, but to say it is "almost impossible to function with the five big tech giants"?  That says a lot about how humans today function as well as about how pathetically poorly many would function in an all out power grid shut down lasting more than a few days.  Our species has become rather delicate and weak.


    I saw this first hand during Sandy here in NY.  The level of incompetence by people, first responders, and voted officials following the aftermath was just mind blowing.


    That must have been hell to go through- I can't imagine.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,528
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    If what this article says is true for many people, it is proof positive that technology is taking over our lives- or more accurately stated,  that many people are allowing technology to take over their lives:


    The article does make a good point about how interconnected many on-line sites are, but to say it is "almost impossible to function with the five big tech giants"?  That says a lot about how humans today function as well as about how pathetically poorly many would function in an all out power grid shut down lasting more than a few days.  Our species has become rather delicate and weak.


    I saw this first hand during Sandy here in NY.  The level of incompetence by people, first responders, and voted officials following the aftermath was just mind blowing.


    That must have been hell to go through- I can't imagine.
    I was prepared.  I showed up w 200 gallons of gas, a generator, flashlights and batteries.

    Hooked up the generator to the house and we had heat and lights.  It was a ghost town in the surrounding areas though at night.

    The traffic lights were a nightmare.  No one stopped at the lights like you're supposed to.  The cops didn't enforce it either until someone finally got killed then they changed the traffic patterns.

    It took officials almost 3 weeks to get the fuel situation under control.

    NJ had it right w doing odd and even days with your cars' license plates from day one.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,554
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    If what this article says is true for many people, it is proof positive that technology is taking over our lives- or more accurately stated,  that many people are allowing technology to take over their lives:


    The article does make a good point about how interconnected many on-line sites are, but to say it is "almost impossible to function with the five big tech giants"?  That says a lot about how humans today function as well as about how pathetically poorly many would function in an all out power grid shut down lasting more than a few days.  Our species has become rather delicate and weak.


    I saw this first hand during Sandy here in NY.  The level of incompetence by people, first responders, and voted officials following the aftermath was just mind blowing.


    That must have been hell to go through- I can't imagine.
    I was prepared.  I showed up w 200 gallons of gas, a generator, flashlights and batteries.

    Hooked up the generator to the house and we had heat and lights.  It was a ghost town in the surrounding areas though at night.

    The traffic lights were a nightmare.  No one stopped at the lights like you're supposed to.  The cops didn't enforce it either until someone finally got killed then they changed the traffic patterns.

    It took officials almost 3 weeks to get the fuel situation under control.

    NJ had it right w doing odd and even days with your cars' license plates from day one.
    California (maybe other states?) did the same thing during the 70's oil embargo. 
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,528
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    If what this article says is true for many people, it is proof positive that technology is taking over our lives- or more accurately stated,  that many people are allowing technology to take over their lives:


    The article does make a good point about how interconnected many on-line sites are, but to say it is "almost impossible to function with the five big tech giants"?  That says a lot about how humans today function as well as about how pathetically poorly many would function in an all out power grid shut down lasting more than a few days.  Our species has become rather delicate and weak.


    I saw this first hand during Sandy here in NY.  The level of incompetence by people, first responders, and voted officials following the aftermath was just mind blowing.


    That must have been hell to go through- I can't imagine.
    I was prepared.  I showed up w 200 gallons of gas, a generator, flashlights and batteries.

    Hooked up the generator to the house and we had heat and lights.  It was a ghost town in the surrounding areas though at night.

    The traffic lights were a nightmare.  No one stopped at the lights like you're supposed to.  The cops didn't enforce it either until someone finally got killed then they changed the traffic patterns.

    It took officials almost 3 weeks to get the fuel situation under control.

    NJ had it right w doing odd and even days with your cars' license plates from day one.
    California (maybe other states?) did the same thing during the 70's oil embargo. 
    NJ learned from the past, NY did not.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,554
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    If what this article says is true for many people, it is proof positive that technology is taking over our lives- or more accurately stated,  that many people are allowing technology to take over their lives:


    The article does make a good point about how interconnected many on-line sites are, but to say it is "almost impossible to function with the five big tech giants"?  That says a lot about how humans today function as well as about how pathetically poorly many would function in an all out power grid shut down lasting more than a few days.  Our species has become rather delicate and weak.


    I saw this first hand during Sandy here in NY.  The level of incompetence by people, first responders, and voted officials following the aftermath was just mind blowing.


    That must have been hell to go through- I can't imagine.
    I was prepared.  I showed up w 200 gallons of gas, a generator, flashlights and batteries.

    Hooked up the generator to the house and we had heat and lights.  It was a ghost town in the surrounding areas though at night.

    The traffic lights were a nightmare.  No one stopped at the lights like you're supposed to.  The cops didn't enforce it either until someone finally got killed then they changed the traffic patterns.

    It took officials almost 3 weeks to get the fuel situation under control.

    NJ had it right w doing odd and even days with your cars' license plates from day one.
    California (maybe other states?) did the same thing during the 70's oil embargo. 
    NJ learned from the past, NY did not.
    Bummer.

    This led me to the question- Whatever happened to peak oil?  In the late 1990'0-early 2000 years I read a lot about peak oil and was convinced we were at or close to peak oil.  Now we don't hear much about it.  Wree the peak oil folks wrong?  Is it being stifled because of concerns for how the public would react?  I really don't know any more.  If we are truly far, far away from peak oil, I would find that disastrous considering pretty much everyone other than extreme deniers realized global warming is real and is here to stay (and likely to get worse).  Having plenty of oil (if that is the case) could seal our fate.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,528
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    If what this article says is true for many people, it is proof positive that technology is taking over our lives- or more accurately stated,  that many people are allowing technology to take over their lives:


    The article does make a good point about how interconnected many on-line sites are, but to say it is "almost impossible to function with the five big tech giants"?  That says a lot about how humans today function as well as about how pathetically poorly many would function in an all out power grid shut down lasting more than a few days.  Our species has become rather delicate and weak.


    I saw this first hand during Sandy here in NY.  The level of incompetence by people, first responders, and voted officials following the aftermath was just mind blowing.


    That must have been hell to go through- I can't imagine.
    I was prepared.  I showed up w 200 gallons of gas, a generator, flashlights and batteries.

    Hooked up the generator to the house and we had heat and lights.  It was a ghost town in the surrounding areas though at night.

    The traffic lights were a nightmare.  No one stopped at the lights like you're supposed to.  The cops didn't enforce it either until someone finally got killed then they changed the traffic patterns.

    It took officials almost 3 weeks to get the fuel situation under control.

    NJ had it right w doing odd and even days with your cars' license plates from day one.
    California (maybe other states?) did the same thing during the 70's oil embargo. 
    NJ learned from the past, NY did not.
    Bummer.

    This led me to the question- Whatever happened to peak oil?  In the late 1990'0-early 2000 years I read a lot about peak oil and was convinced we were at or close to peak oil.  Now we don't hear much about it.  Wree the peak oil folks wrong?  Is it being stifled because of concerns for how the public would react?  I really don't know any more.  If we are truly far, far away from peak oil, I would find that disastrous considering pretty much everyone other than extreme deniers realized global warming is real and is here to stay (and likely to get worse).  Having plenty of oil (if that is the case) could seal our fate.
    I do know that Dubai was running out of oil, hence they building boom there.  They needed to create something to make money, lol.

    The technology has gotten better where we can now extract the oil from the sands and the shale so the US & Canada have ramped up production.

    As far as everywhere else I have no idea.  I'd think that we would be trying to fuel our cars w peanut oil if we were truly running out?
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,554
    I do know that Dubai was running out of oil, hence they building boom there.  They needed to create something to make money, lol.

    The technology has gotten better where we can now extract the oil from the sands and the shale so the US & Canada have ramped up production.

    As far as everywhere else I have no idea.  I'd think that we would be trying to fuel our cars w peanut oil if we were truly running out?
    I don't know what the latest is with sand and shale oil but I remember reading that the cost for extraction both in dollars and energy needed to do the extraction made for a poor... energy ratio?  (I can't remember the correct term but it has to do with net gain of energy per unit of energy used to produce energy). 

    The peanut/vegetable biodiesel thing sounded great at first but I think they figured out there was only so much of it to go around and, again, growing peanuts to make oil takes a lot of fuel to drive the tractors and combines, etc.  needed to produce the peanuts, or corn, etc.

    And, as I often say, can we really supply and maintain a first world standard of living for 7.7 billion people?  I don't think we've figured that out yet.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,273

Sign In or Register to comment.