Opioid Addiction in the US, Heroin and Oxys

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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,264

     
    CVS, Walgreens announce opioid settlements totaling $10B
    By GEOFF MULVIHILL
    Today

    The two largest U.S. pharmacy chains, CVS Health and Walgreen Co., announced agreements in principle Wednesday to pay about $5 billion each to settle lawsuits nationwide over the toll of opioids, and a lawyer said Walmart, a third pharmacy behemoth, is in discussions for a deal.

    The prospective settlements are part of a shift in the legal landscape surrounding the opioid epidemic. Instead of suspense over whether companies in the drug industry would be held to account through trials or settlements, the big question is now how their money will be used and whether it will make a difference in fighting a crisis that has only intensified.

    The deals, if completed, would end thousands of lawsuits in which governments claimed pharmacies filled prescriptions they should have flagged as inappropriate. With settlements already proposed or finalized between some of the biggest drugmakers and distribution companies, the recent developments could be the among the last multibillion-dollar settlements to be announced.

    They also would bring the total value of all settlements to more than $50 billion, with most of it required to be used by state and local governments to combat opioids, which have been linked to more than 500,000 deaths in the U.S. over the last two decades.

    “It's one more culprit of the overdose crisis that is having to pay their dues," said Courtney Gary-Allen, organizing director of the Maine Recovery Advocacy Project. "Average Americans have been paying it for a long time."

    Gary-Allen, who is a member of a council that will help determine how Maine uses its opioid settlement funds, said more money to address the problem will help. In her state, she said, the needs include more beds for medical detox and for treatment.

    Neither Woonsocket, Rhode Island-based CVS nor Deerfield, Illinois-based Walgreens is admitting wrongdoing.

    The plans spring from mediation involving a group of state attorneys general. Before they move ahead, state and then local governments would need to sign on. So far, the detailed, formal deals have not been presented to the government entities so they can decide whether to join.

    Under the tentative plans, CVS would pay $4.9 billion to local governments and about $130 million to Native American tribes over a decade. Walgreens would pay $4.8 billion to governments and $155 million to tribes over 15 years. The exact amount depends on how many governments join the deals.

    Both noted they have been addressing the crisis through such measures as starting educational programs and installing safe disposal units for drugs in stores and police departments. And both said the settlements would allow them to help while staying focused on their business.

    “We are pleased to resolve these longstanding claims and putting them behind us is in the best interest of all parties, as well as our customers, colleagues and shareholders,” Thomas Moriarty, CVS chief policy officer and general counsel, said in a statement.

    Walgreens said in a statement: “As one of the largest pharmacy chains in the nation, we remain committed to being a part of the solution, and this settlement framework will allow us to keep our focus on the health and wellbeing of our customers and patients, while making positive contributions to address the opioid crisis,” Walgreens said in a statement.

    Paul Geller, a lawyer for governments in the lawsuits, said talks with Walmart continue. Walmart representatives would not comment Wednesday.

    “These agreements will be the first resolutions reached with pharmacy chains and will equip communities across the country with the much-needed tools to fight back against this epidemic and bring about tangible, positive change,” lawyers for local governments said in a statement. “In addition to payments totaling billions of dollars, these companies have committed to making significant improvements to their dispensing practices to help reduce addiction moving forward.”

    If these settlements are completed, they would leave mostly smaller drug industry players as defendants in lawsuits. Just this week, a group of mostly regional pharmacy chains sent to a judge, who is overseeing federal litigation, information about claims they face, a possible precursor to scheduling trials or mediating settlements involving some of those firms.

    “One by one, we are holding every player in the addiction industry accountable for the millions of lives lost or devastated by the opioid epidemic,” Connecticut Attorney General William Tong said in a statement. “The companies that helped to create and fuel this crisis must commit to changing their businesses practices, and to providing the resources needed for treatment, prevention and recovery.”

    Most of the nation's opioid overdose deaths initially involved prescription drugs. As governments, doctors and companies took steps to make them harder to abuse and obtain, people addicted to them increasingly switched to heroin, which proved more deadly.

    In recent years, opioid deaths have soared to record levels around 80,000 a year. Most of those deaths involve illicitly produced version of the powerful lab-made drug fentanyl, which is appearing throughout the U.S. supply of illegal drugs.

    Only a handful of opioid settlements have had bigger dollar figures than the CVS plan. Distributors AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson this year finalized a combined settlement worth $21 billion, and drugmaker Johnson & Johnson finalized a $5 billion deal.

    Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and members of the Sackler family who own the company have a proposed settlement that would involve up to $6 billion in cash, plus the value of the company, which would be turned into a new entity with its profits used to combat the epidemic. That plan has been put on hold by a court.

    ___

    Associated Press writer Tom Murphy in Indianapolis contributed to this report.


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  • How much money are these companies making off of pills?  Holee chit!
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,264
    How much money are these companies making off of pills?  Holee chit!

    pays out over 10 years.
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • OnWis97OnWis97 St. Paul, MNPosts: 4,471
    smile6680 said:
    Depends on your age. No one under 35 didn't know how addictive oxy's or heroin was when they took them. I feel bad for the people who were prescribed them for legitimate reasons a couple decades ago and got addicted. They weren't bombarded with how addictive and destructive they are like we are now.

    It's like people who smoke, get addicted and contract cancer. If your under the age of 50, there isn't any excuse for not knowing. I do feel bad for people over the age of 60 or so. They didn't have the same amount of information or warnings.

    I do feel compassion for anyone dealing with any sort of serious addictions.
    I was watching a recent network TV interview with Matthew Perry (of "Friends" fame). And he's struggled with addiction his whole life. It essentially started the first time he drank underaged. Somehow, his friends did it for fun from time to time and he just did it all the time. He was essentially born to be an alcoholic. He got into pills after they were subscribed for some kind of pain. I don't even think this was his goal, but it really conveyed how becoming chemically dependent can sneak up on a person and it kind of dulls the "well they made a choice to first use it." Sure, that first drink was his decision, but how many people have never taken a drink?

    I get it; I've never used anything worse than alcohol...not even weed. And when I first drank (summer after junior year of high school) I made a conscious decision that I wasn't going to mess with anything else. Fear of addiction is a big part of that (and why I never became a tobacco user, too). You can suggest that others made those choices, but it's not necessarily that black and white. For example, I was scared of addiction but I drank and chose not to use marijuana?  That's how ignorant I was. I really believe that it's pure luck that all my college drinking never brought me down the road to using booze to numb pain or overcome some sort of anxiety (and I do have OCD, an anxiety disorder). Really, the difference between Perry and me is luck. Now, yeah, it's a terrible idea to use heroin or other hard drugs but there's a little bit of gray there. My uncle has said "I thank god every day I never liked cocaine." He smoked a lot of weed and apparently tried coke twice. Is he any better than someone that ended up with a cocaine problem? Or just luckier?

    Bad idea to ever get into hard drugs, but there are then a lot of people to judge.
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  • mickeyrat said:
    How much money are these companies making off of pills?  Holee chit!

    pays out over 10 years.
    still.  500mill each per company for 10 years.  They each pay 2.5Bil...
    And they are still companies.  They aren't bankrupt.

    Ho lee chit
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,264
    mickeyrat said:
    How much money are these companies making off of pills?  Holee chit!

    pays out over 10 years.
    still.  500mill each per company for 10 years.  They each pay 2.5Bil...
    And they are still companies.  They aren't bankrupt.

    Ho lee chit

    no. they each pay 5 billion
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,264

     
    US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors
    By MIKE STOBBE
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday softened its guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention new recommendations are an update to 2016 guidelines that added momentum to a decline in opioid painkiller prescriptions.

    Opioids painkillers can be addictive — even when used under doctors’ orders — and were identified as a big reason for a rise in U.S. drug overdoses that began more than two decades ago. Other drugs have overtaken them in overdose statistics, and illicit fentanyl is now the biggest driver of deaths.

    The previous guidance succeeded in reducing inappropriate and dangerous prescribing, some experts say. But they also were seen as a barrier to care, with some pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions as doctors wrote them.

    The new guidelines are designed to ensure that patients get compassionate and safe pain care, CDC officials said.

    A draft released in February received 5,500 public comments. Some modifications were made, but several main changes stayed in place, including:

    —The CDC no longer suggests trying to limit opioid treatment for acute pain to three days.

    —The agency is dropping the specific recommendation that doctors avoid increasing dosage to a level equivalent to 90 milligrams of morphine per day.

    —For patients receiving higher doses of opioids, the CDC is urging doctors to not abruptly halt treatment unless there are indications of a life-threatening danger. The agency offers suggestions on tapering patients off the drugs.

    ___

    The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:
    How much money are these companies making off of pills?  Holee chit!

    pays out over 10 years.
    still.  500mill each per company for 10 years.  They each pay 2.5Bil...
    And they are still companies.  They aren't bankrupt.

    Ho lee chit

    no. they each pay 5 billion
    I read it wrong.  That is even worse.  They can BOTH pay a billion a year and not even a whimper.  Wow.
  • mickeyrat said:

     
    US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors
    By MIKE STOBBE
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday softened its guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention new recommendations are an update to 2016 guidelines that added momentum to a decline in opioid painkiller prescriptions.

    Opioids painkillers can be addictive — even when used under doctors’ orders — and were identified as a big reason for a rise in U.S. drug overdoses that began more than two decades ago. Other drugs have overtaken them in overdose statistics, and illicit fentanyl is now the biggest driver of deaths.

    The previous guidance succeeded in reducing inappropriate and dangerous prescribing, some experts say. But they also were seen as a barrier to care, with some pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions as doctors wrote them.

    The new guidelines are designed to ensure that patients get compassionate and safe pain care, CDC officials said.

    A draft released in February received 5,500 public comments. Some modifications were made, but several main changes stayed in place, including:

    —The CDC no longer suggests trying to limit opioid treatment for acute pain to three days.

    —The agency is dropping the specific recommendation that doctors avoid increasing dosage to a level equivalent to 90 milligrams of morphine per day.

    —For patients receiving higher doses of opioids, the CDC is urging doctors to not abruptly halt treatment unless there are indications of a life-threatening danger. The agency offers suggestions on tapering patients off the drugs.

    ___

    The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


    So when doctors follow CDC guidelines and shit blows up again the doctors can't get sued now?
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,264
    edited November 2022
    mickeyrat said:

     
    US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors
    By MIKE STOBBE
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday softened its guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention new recommendations are an update to 2016 guidelines that added momentum to a decline in opioid painkiller prescriptions.

    Opioids painkillers can be addictive — even when used under doctors’ orders — and were identified as a big reason for a rise in U.S. drug overdoses that began more than two decades ago. Other drugs have overtaken them in overdose statistics, and illicit fentanyl is now the biggest driver of deaths.

    The previous guidance succeeded in reducing inappropriate and dangerous prescribing, some experts say. But they also were seen as a barrier to care, with some pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions as doctors wrote them.

    The new guidelines are designed to ensure that patients get compassionate and safe pain care, CDC officials said.

    A draft released in February received 5,500 public comments. Some modifications were made, but several main changes stayed in place, including:

    —The CDC no longer suggests trying to limit opioid treatment for acute pain to three days.

    —The agency is dropping the specific recommendation that doctors avoid increasing dosage to a level equivalent to 90 milligrams of morphine per day.

    —For patients receiving higher doses of opioids, the CDC is urging doctors to not abruptly halt treatment unless there are indications of a life-threatening danger. The agency offers suggestions on tapering patients off the drugs.

    ___

    The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


    So when doctors follow CDC guidelines and shit blows up again the doctors can't get sued now?

    well here in ohio theres a process where a separate doctor reviews cases and records and I think interviews patients to gauge thereputic use and avoid abuse.

    the clapdown fucked those in true need. pain the drug was initially designed to treat.
    Post edited by mickeyrat on
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:

     
    US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors
    By MIKE STOBBE
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday softened its guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention new recommendations are an update to 2016 guidelines that added momentum to a decline in opioid painkiller prescriptions.

    Opioids painkillers can be addictive — even when used under doctors’ orders — and were identified as a big reason for a rise in U.S. drug overdoses that began more than two decades ago. Other drugs have overtaken them in overdose statistics, and illicit fentanyl is now the biggest driver of deaths.

    The previous guidance succeeded in reducing inappropriate and dangerous prescribing, some experts say. But they also were seen as a barrier to care, with some pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions as doctors wrote them.

    The new guidelines are designed to ensure that patients get compassionate and safe pain care, CDC officials said.

    A draft released in February received 5,500 public comments. Some modifications were made, but several main changes stayed in place, including:

    —The CDC no longer suggests trying to limit opioid treatment for acute pain to three days.

    —The agency is dropping the specific recommendation that doctors avoid increasing dosage to a level equivalent to 90 milligrams of morphine per day.

    —For patients receiving higher doses of opioids, the CDC is urging doctors to not abruptly halt treatment unless there are indications of a life-threatening danger. The agency offers suggestions on tapering patients off the drugs.

    ___

    The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


    So when doctors follow CDC guidelines and shit blows up again the doctors can't get sued now?

    well here in ohio theres a process where a separate doctor reviews cases and records and I think interviews patients to gauge thereputic use and avoid abuse.

    the clapdown fucked those in true need. pain the drug was initially designed to treat.
    A doctor should understand how to administer the drugs and see signs of abuse.  Jumping patients through multiple hoops is just CYA for the CDC.
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,264
    mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:

     
    US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors
    By MIKE STOBBE
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday softened its guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention new recommendations are an update to 2016 guidelines that added momentum to a decline in opioid painkiller prescriptions.

    Opioids painkillers can be addictive — even when used under doctors’ orders — and were identified as a big reason for a rise in U.S. drug overdoses that began more than two decades ago. Other drugs have overtaken them in overdose statistics, and illicit fentanyl is now the biggest driver of deaths.

    The previous guidance succeeded in reducing inappropriate and dangerous prescribing, some experts say. But they also were seen as a barrier to care, with some pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions as doctors wrote them.

    The new guidelines are designed to ensure that patients get compassionate and safe pain care, CDC officials said.

    A draft released in February received 5,500 public comments. Some modifications were made, but several main changes stayed in place, including:

    —The CDC no longer suggests trying to limit opioid treatment for acute pain to three days.

    —The agency is dropping the specific recommendation that doctors avoid increasing dosage to a level equivalent to 90 milligrams of morphine per day.

    —For patients receiving higher doses of opioids, the CDC is urging doctors to not abruptly halt treatment unless there are indications of a life-threatening danger. The agency offers suggestions on tapering patients off the drugs.

    ___

    The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


    So when doctors follow CDC guidelines and shit blows up again the doctors can't get sued now?

    well here in ohio theres a process where a separate doctor reviews cases and records and I think interviews patients to gauge thereputic use and avoid abuse.

    the clapdown fucked those in true need. pain the drug was initially designed to treat.
    A doctor should understand how to administer the drugs and see signs of abuse.  Jumping patients through multiple hoops is just CYA for the CDC.

    nah. it removes the personal connection between doctor and patient. reviewer can be more objective
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:

     
    US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors
    By MIKE STOBBE
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday softened its guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention new recommendations are an update to 2016 guidelines that added momentum to a decline in opioid painkiller prescriptions.

    Opioids painkillers can be addictive — even when used under doctors’ orders — and were identified as a big reason for a rise in U.S. drug overdoses that began more than two decades ago. Other drugs have overtaken them in overdose statistics, and illicit fentanyl is now the biggest driver of deaths.

    The previous guidance succeeded in reducing inappropriate and dangerous prescribing, some experts say. But they also were seen as a barrier to care, with some pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions as doctors wrote them.

    The new guidelines are designed to ensure that patients get compassionate and safe pain care, CDC officials said.

    A draft released in February received 5,500 public comments. Some modifications were made, but several main changes stayed in place, including:

    —The CDC no longer suggests trying to limit opioid treatment for acute pain to three days.

    —The agency is dropping the specific recommendation that doctors avoid increasing dosage to a level equivalent to 90 milligrams of morphine per day.

    —For patients receiving higher doses of opioids, the CDC is urging doctors to not abruptly halt treatment unless there are indications of a life-threatening danger. The agency offers suggestions on tapering patients off the drugs.

    ___

    The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


    So when doctors follow CDC guidelines and shit blows up again the doctors can't get sued now?

    well here in ohio theres a process where a separate doctor reviews cases and records and I think interviews patients to gauge thereputic use and avoid abuse.

    the clapdown fucked those in true need. pain the drug was initially designed to treat.
    A doctor should understand how to administer the drugs and see signs of abuse.  Jumping patients through multiple hoops is just CYA for the CDC.

    nah. it removes the personal connection between doctor and patient. reviewer can be more objective
    I'm failing to see how this makes anything better.  It makes a patient, like you said, in true need have to wait longer.  That's how I read it as.
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,264
    mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:

     
    US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors
    By MIKE STOBBE
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday softened its guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention new recommendations are an update to 2016 guidelines that added momentum to a decline in opioid painkiller prescriptions.

    Opioids painkillers can be addictive — even when used under doctors’ orders — and were identified as a big reason for a rise in U.S. drug overdoses that began more than two decades ago. Other drugs have overtaken them in overdose statistics, and illicit fentanyl is now the biggest driver of deaths.

    The previous guidance succeeded in reducing inappropriate and dangerous prescribing, some experts say. But they also were seen as a barrier to care, with some pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions as doctors wrote them.

    The new guidelines are designed to ensure that patients get compassionate and safe pain care, CDC officials said.

    A draft released in February received 5,500 public comments. Some modifications were made, but several main changes stayed in place, including:

    —The CDC no longer suggests trying to limit opioid treatment for acute pain to three days.

    —The agency is dropping the specific recommendation that doctors avoid increasing dosage to a level equivalent to 90 milligrams of morphine per day.

    —For patients receiving higher doses of opioids, the CDC is urging doctors to not abruptly halt treatment unless there are indications of a life-threatening danger. The agency offers suggestions on tapering patients off the drugs.

    ___

    The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


    So when doctors follow CDC guidelines and shit blows up again the doctors can't get sued now?

    well here in ohio theres a process where a separate doctor reviews cases and records and I think interviews patients to gauge thereputic use and avoid abuse.

    the clapdown fucked those in true need. pain the drug was initially designed to treat.
    A doctor should understand how to administer the drugs and see signs of abuse.  Jumping patients through multiple hoops is just CYA for the CDC.

    nah. it removes the personal connection between doctor and patient. reviewer can be more objective
    I'm failing to see how this makes anything better.  It makes a patient, like you said, in true need have to wait longer.  That's how I read it as.

    this was implemented when ohio began cracking down on the pill mills. I dont know if its still in place

    the problem for the chronics as stated in the article was/is pharmacies refusing to fill. these. guidelines look to address that and more.

    but I posted as a marker of sorts to see where we are now and what this ultimately contributes to.
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:

     
    US agency softens opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors
    By MIKE STOBBE
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s top public health agency on Thursday softened its guidelines for U.S. doctors prescribing oxycodone and other opioid painkillers.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention new recommendations are an update to 2016 guidelines that added momentum to a decline in opioid painkiller prescriptions.

    Opioids painkillers can be addictive — even when used under doctors’ orders — and were identified as a big reason for a rise in U.S. drug overdoses that began more than two decades ago. Other drugs have overtaken them in overdose statistics, and illicit fentanyl is now the biggest driver of deaths.

    The previous guidance succeeded in reducing inappropriate and dangerous prescribing, some experts say. But they also were seen as a barrier to care, with some pharmacists refusing to fill prescriptions as doctors wrote them.

    The new guidelines are designed to ensure that patients get compassionate and safe pain care, CDC officials said.

    A draft released in February received 5,500 public comments. Some modifications were made, but several main changes stayed in place, including:

    —The CDC no longer suggests trying to limit opioid treatment for acute pain to three days.

    —The agency is dropping the specific recommendation that doctors avoid increasing dosage to a level equivalent to 90 milligrams of morphine per day.

    —For patients receiving higher doses of opioids, the CDC is urging doctors to not abruptly halt treatment unless there are indications of a life-threatening danger. The agency offers suggestions on tapering patients off the drugs.

    ___

    The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


    So when doctors follow CDC guidelines and shit blows up again the doctors can't get sued now?

    well here in ohio theres a process where a separate doctor reviews cases and records and I think interviews patients to gauge thereputic use and avoid abuse.

    the clapdown fucked those in true need. pain the drug was initially designed to treat.
    A doctor should understand how to administer the drugs and see signs of abuse.  Jumping patients through multiple hoops is just CYA for the CDC.

    nah. it removes the personal connection between doctor and patient. reviewer can be more objective
    I'm failing to see how this makes anything better.  It makes a patient, like you said, in true need have to wait longer.  That's how I read it as.

    this was implemented when ohio began cracking down on the pill mills. I dont know if its still in place

    the problem for the chronics as stated in the article was/is pharmacies refusing to fill. these. guidelines look to address that and more.

    but I posted as a marker of sorts to see where we are now and what this ultimately contributes to.
    If you were a doctor would you want to prescribe this?  I sure as hell wouldn't.
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