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Police abuse

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  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 27,593
    mace1229 said:
    mace1229 said:
    From the WaPo's database today, not 2019. Tallied since 2015. 

    In 2015, The Washington Post began to log every fatal shooting by an on-duty police officer in the United States. In that time there have been more than 5,000 such shootings recorded by The Post.

    Jump to the database

    After Michael Brown, an unarmed Black man, was killed in 2014 by police in Ferguson, Mo., a Post investigation found that the FBI undercounted fatal police shootings by more than half. This is because reporting by police departments is voluntary and many departments fail to do so.

    The Post’s data relies primarily on news accounts, social media postings and police reports. Analysis of more than five years of data reveals that the number and circumstances of fatal shootings and the overall demographics of the victims have remained relatively constant.

    Rate of shootings remains steady

    Despite the unpredictable events that lead to fatal shootings, police nationwide have shot and killed almost the same number of people annually — nearly 1,000 — since The Post began its project. Probability theory may offer an explanation. It holds that the quantity of rare events in huge populations tends to remain stable absent major societal changes, such as a fundamental shift in police culture or extreme restrictions on gun ownership.

    Black Americans are killed at a much higher rate than White Americans

    Although half of the people shot and killed by police are White, Black Americans are shot at a disproportionate rate. They account for less than 13 percent of the U.S. population, but are killed by police at more than twice the rate of White Americans. Hispanic Americans are also killed by police at a disproportionate rate.

    The rate at which black Americans are killed by police is more than twice as high as the rate for white Americans.
    Filtered by gun possession:

    3,642 people shot and killed by police match your filters (58%)

    2,599 people do not match your filters (42%)

    Filtered by knife possession:

    1,076 people shot and killed by police match your filters (17%)

    5,165 people do not match your filters (83%)

    Filtered by car as a weapon:

    199 people shot and killed by police match your filters (3%)

    6,042 people do not match your filters (97%)

    Filtered by toy weapon:

    226 people shot and killed by police match your filters (4%)

    6,015 people do not match your filters (96%)

    Filtered by Other weapon:

    527 people shot and killed by police match your filters (8%)

    5,714 people do not match your filters (92%)

    Filtered by unarmed:

    402 people shot and killed by police match your filters (6%)

    5,839 people do not match your filters (94%)

    I'm not sure if this was a response to my post or not. But also supports that the majority of those shot were armed. Counting toy guns and unarmed together that is 10% of shootings.
    Relax, its context, particularly this part:

    Black Americans are killed at a much higher rate than White Americans

    Although half of the people shot and killed by police are White, Black Americans are shot at a disproportionate rate. They account for less than 13 percent of the U.S. population, but are killed by police at more than twice the rate of White Americans. Hispanic Americans are also killed by police at a disproportionate rate.

    The rate at which black Americans are killed by police is more than twice as high as the rate for white Americans.

    I have never disputed that. I assumed you were responding to my comment about the number of unarmed shooting victims. A claim was made that only a small portion of shootings are for armed individuals, and that most are unarmed. That isn't true. Since you provided a breakdown of statistics I assumed that was what you were getting at. If that wasn't you were responding to then I did not mean to comment. 
    It seems to me, IMHO, its another attempt to minimize the issue, particularly the comment about lighting strikes and the bolded below. Compared to white folks being shot and killed by police, I'd consider it an "epidemic." If you don't, think what the response would be if 2 to 5 times as many whites were shot and killed by police, armed or unarmed.

    Higgins: Enough of the lying – just look at the data. There’s no epidemic of racist police officers killing black Americans. | Citizens Journal | Citizens Journal

    Minimization seems to be the strategy. That and victim blaming. Both the victim and their family members. Or relying on a link from a county newspaper from a county that's 65% white and blacks make up 5% of the population. But that's just me.
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  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 5,981
    mace1229 said:
    mace1229 said:
    From the WaPo's database today, not 2019. Tallied since 2015. 

    In 2015, The Washington Post began to log every fatal shooting by an on-duty police officer in the United States. In that time there have been more than 5,000 such shootings recorded by The Post.

    Jump to the database

    After Michael Brown, an unarmed Black man, was killed in 2014 by police in Ferguson, Mo., a Post investigation found that the FBI undercounted fatal police shootings by more than half. This is because reporting by police departments is voluntary and many departments fail to do so.

    The Post’s data relies primarily on news accounts, social media postings and police reports. Analysis of more than five years of data reveals that the number and circumstances of fatal shootings and the overall demographics of the victims have remained relatively constant.

    Rate of shootings remains steady

    Despite the unpredictable events that lead to fatal shootings, police nationwide have shot and killed almost the same number of people annually — nearly 1,000 — since The Post began its project. Probability theory may offer an explanation. It holds that the quantity of rare events in huge populations tends to remain stable absent major societal changes, such as a fundamental shift in police culture or extreme restrictions on gun ownership.

    Black Americans are killed at a much higher rate than White Americans

    Although half of the people shot and killed by police are White, Black Americans are shot at a disproportionate rate. They account for less than 13 percent of the U.S. population, but are killed by police at more than twice the rate of White Americans. Hispanic Americans are also killed by police at a disproportionate rate.

    The rate at which black Americans are killed by police is more than twice as high as the rate for white Americans.
    Filtered by gun possession:

    3,642 people shot and killed by police match your filters (58%)

    2,599 people do not match your filters (42%)

    Filtered by knife possession:

    1,076 people shot and killed by police match your filters (17%)

    5,165 people do not match your filters (83%)

    Filtered by car as a weapon:

    199 people shot and killed by police match your filters (3%)

    6,042 people do not match your filters (97%)

    Filtered by toy weapon:

    226 people shot and killed by police match your filters (4%)

    6,015 people do not match your filters (96%)

    Filtered by Other weapon:

    527 people shot and killed by police match your filters (8%)

    5,714 people do not match your filters (92%)

    Filtered by unarmed:

    402 people shot and killed by police match your filters (6%)

    5,839 people do not match your filters (94%)

    I'm not sure if this was a response to my post or not. But also supports that the majority of those shot were armed. Counting toy guns and unarmed together that is 10% of shootings.
    Relax, its context, particularly this part:

    Black Americans are killed at a much higher rate than White Americans

    Although half of the people shot and killed by police are White, Black Americans are shot at a disproportionate rate. They account for less than 13 percent of the U.S. population, but are killed by police at more than twice the rate of White Americans. Hispanic Americans are also killed by police at a disproportionate rate.

    The rate at which black Americans are killed by police is more than twice as high as the rate for white Americans.

    I have never disputed that. I assumed you were responding to my comment about the number of unarmed shooting victims. A claim was made that only a small portion of shootings are for armed individuals, and that most are unarmed. That isn't true. Since you provided a breakdown of statistics I assumed that was what you were getting at. If that wasn't you were responding to then I did not mean to comment. 
    It seems to me, IMHO, its another attempt to minimize the issue, particularly the comment about lighting strikes and the bolded below. Compared to white folks being shot and killed by police, I'd consider it an "epidemic." If you don't, think what the response would be if 2 to 5 times as many whites were shot and killed by police, armed or unarmed.

    Higgins: Enough of the lying – just look at the data. There’s no epidemic of racist police officers killing black Americans. | Citizens Journal | Citizens Journal

    Minimization seems to be the strategy. That and victim blaming. Both the victim and their family members. Or relying on a link from a county newspaper from a county that's 65% white and blacks make up 5% of the population. But that's just me.
    I wasn’t minimizing anything. A claim was made that only a small portion of people shot by police are armed. That wasn’t true. Not even close to true. I provided a link with data that disputes that claim. I wasn’t interested in the lightning part, just the number of armed vs unarmed.
    When I searched for the data I did a quick skim of the top search results, and they were all from what appeared to be pro-cop or right leaning. So it’s not surprising they included a comparison to lightning strikes. But I wouldn’t really expect anti-cop sources to be quoting that the vast majority of shootings are armed either. That doesn’t fit the “open season” headlines we’ve been getting. The way the media covers it they want to go think most shootings are unjustified unarmed men.
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 24,706
    Judge blocking police body cams footage of brown killing is a travesty North Carolina another shitholestate! 
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 20,855
     
    Use-of-force cases prompt state debates over officer records
    By COLLEEN SLEVIN
    Today

    DENVER (AP) — Lawmakers in more than 20 states have considered bills this year to make the disciplinary records of police officers public or to share them with other agencies, a push that comes amid high-profile deaths at the hands of law enforcement. About 20 states still largely prohibit their release, however.

    Supporters of greater transparency say it could help improve police accountability, build trust with the community and prevent officers with disciplinary problems who leave one department from being hired by another.

    Opponents say the release of such records could harm the reputations of officers with only minor infractions or even put them in danger. They also argue that disciplinary actions are part of personnel records, which are exempt from state open records laws.

    But amid growing nationwide protests against alleged excessive force by police officers, at least 16 states have contemplated measures to release such records, or summaries of them, publicly. Another eight have discussed making the records accessible to other law enforcement agencies.

    In Utah, Republican Gov. Spencer Cox signed a bill in March providing legal immunity to law enforcement agencies that share background information about former employees with other agencies looking to hire. State Sen. Jani Iwamoto, a Democrat in the GOP-dominated Legislature, introduced the legislation in response to the case of a University of Utah officer who resigned while being investigated for allegedly sharing explicit photographs of a victim in an alleged extortion case who was later killed. The officer was later hired by police in Logan, Utah, who did not know about the probe.

    “We want people to feel that they can report a bad cop,” said Iwamoto, who also successfully sponsored another bill to ensure that police disciplinary investigations are completed even if an officer resigns while one is in progress.

    Without legislation in place, lawyers advised police departments not to share disciplinary records lest they be sued, Iwamoto said.

    In North Carolina’s Republican-controlled legislature, lawmakers want to create a confidential database from which law enforcement agencies in the state can track all disciplinary actions to prevent officers from hiding past problems when looking for a new job.

    “We enable agencies to better screen individuals ... so that we can weed out who the bad apples are,” said Republican state Sen. Danny Britt.

    Under an expansive police reform bill Britt is sponsoring, authorities also would track all use of force by officers resulting in serious injury or death. And the legislation would create an “early warning system” to collect data on citizens' complaints and any transgressions with the aim of correcting an officer's behavior before it leads to a deadly outcome.

    Maryland has gone further, approving the release of records related to formal misconduct complaints. The Democrat-controlled Legislature overrode a veto by Republican Gov. Larry Hogan, who objected to the public release of complaints that haven't been substantiated. Supporters contend the public has a right to see how police departments investigate complaints against officers.

    The proposals come amid a national reckoning over the killings of Black people at the hands of police. Efforts to get access to police disciplinary records have increased along with public awareness of the issue, which has grown since the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, said Rachel Moran, an associate professor and founder of the Criminal and Juvenile Defense Clinic at the University of St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis.

    In Maryland, the move is part of a sweeping police reform package that was prompted by the 2018 death of Anton Black, a 19-year-old African American who died in a rural Maryland town after officers pinned him to the ground for more than five minutes as they handcuffed him and shackled his legs.

    One of the officers, Thomas Webster, had nearly 30 use-of-force complaints lodged against him while previously working in neighboring Delaware. Webster also had been charged with second-degree assault in that state for allegedly kicking a Black man in the head, but was acquitted in 2015.

    Anton Black’s sister, LaToya Holley, said she hopes the new law translates into quicker answers for the families of anyone who dies at the hands of police.

    “They need to work on trust,” she said of law enforcement. "There isn’t that much trust in the community.”

    Other states seeking to address policing problems had already taken action before this year.

    In 2018, California lawmakers voted to allow public access to records of officer shootings and other major uses of force. New York lawmakers last year repealed a law that had blocked public disclosure of disciplinary records for police officers, firefighters and correctional officers. Hawaii took similar action, allowing the public to learn the details of more than 80 cases of unwarranted assault and more than 100 cases of officers filing false reports or covering up infractions.

    In New Jersey last year, state Attorney General Gurbir Grewal, without waiting for legislation, ordered local and state police to release the names and summaries of disciplinary records of officers who had been fired, demoted or suspended for more than five days. Grewal said the information was needed to promote community trust and police accountability amid protests against the death of George Floyd in Minnesota.

    For their part, members of New Jersey’s Democrat-controlled legislature considered but have failed to pass a bill this year to make police records public, though an early warning system of the kind being considered by North Carolina is already in place.

    Meanwhile, nothing has come of Grewal's order yet because of a legal challenge by law enforcement unions. They argue that personnel records are exempt under state open records laws, and that officers and their families could be put at risk if they are made public. They also object to releasing information about past confidential disciplinary agreements for problems such as drinking and domestic violence.

    Pat Colligan, president of the New Jersey State Policemen’s Benevolent Association, said many officers who have dealt with problems like that have gone on to have good careers. Colligan said he would support the release of records only for major infractions, such as excessive force and civil rights violations, from now on.

    He also would like to see the state's early warning system be given a chance to provide officers with help or weed out those not meant to wear a badge.

    "People have to stop assuming every officer is a problem officer,” he said.

    ____

    Associated Press writers Mike Catalini in Trenton, New Jersey; Gary Robertson in Raleigh, North Carolina; and Audrey McAvoy in Honolulu, contributed.


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  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 15,380
    Last Tuesday, 32y drunk woman (if i say ''black'', maybe I will be accused of being a racist), hit with her car a policeman..there is a video of her, before the strike, who screams ''f** the police''..
    i didn't see any protests..
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  • nicknyr15nicknyr15 Posts: 4,333
    23scidoo said:
    Last Tuesday, 32y drunk woman (if i say ''black'', maybe I will be accused of being a racist), hit with her car a policeman..there is a video of her, before the strike, who screams ''f** the police''..
    i didn't see any protests..
    Yea. Very sad story. 
  • gvn2fly1421gvn2fly1421 Posts: 739
    I was going to post this in the "Abuse of the Police" thread but I could not find it.  I guess I will leave it here.  Happened last night just up the road from me.  No protests planned, nor national news attention.  Salman Mohammed is a name that doesn't fit the narrative.

    https://www.wkrn.com/news/local-news/metro-officer-shot-during-apparent-setup-released-from-nashville-hospital/

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — A Metro officer shot while responding to a fabricated call of a shooting at a South Nashville home Tuesday evening has been released from a Nashville hospital, according to police.

    Officer Brian Sherman was transported to Vanderbilt University Medical Center for treatment of gunshot wounds to his left arm after he was shot on Sugarloaf Drive, where officers had responded to a call of a shooting around 6:10 p.m.

    Metro police spokesperson, Don Aaron said officers had responded to the home after a man called 911 to report his brother had shot his mother and gunshots were being fired inside the residence.

    “This was a ruse or a setup to get the police to come to the house,” Aaron said during a news conference Tuesday night.

    Three officers, including Sherman, went to the front door of the home and as soon as they knocked, police said the door was opened and multiple shots were fired at officers.

    Aaron said officers did not fire back at the shooter, but added that gunman, identified as Salman Mohammed, eventually exited the home, armed with a rifle. Officers attempted to negotiate with the 22-year-old, but said Mohammed put the rifle to his head and pulled the trigger, fatally shooting himself.

  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 25,911
    23scidoo said:
    Last Tuesday, 32y drunk woman (if i say ''black'', maybe I will be accused of being a racist), hit with her car a policeman..there is a video of her, before the strike, who screams ''f** the police''..
    i didn't see any protests..
    sure, random crime = institutional racism. totes the same. 
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,547
    23scidoo said:
    Last Tuesday, 32y drunk woman (if i say ''black'', maybe I will be accused of being a racist), hit with her car a policeman..there is a video of her, before the strike, who screams ''f** the police''..
    i didn't see any protests..
    sure, random crime = institutional racism. totes the same.
    I want reform, which should happen, you can't bash every cop that's out there though.
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 25,911
    23scidoo said:
    Last Tuesday, 32y drunk woman (if i say ''black'', maybe I will be accused of being a racist), hit with her car a policeman..there is a video of her, before the strike, who screams ''f** the police''..
    i didn't see any protests..
    sure, random crime = institutional racism. totes the same.
    I want reform, which should happen, you can't bash every cop that's out there though.
    I don't. 
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,547
    23scidoo said:
    Last Tuesday, 32y drunk woman (if i say ''black'', maybe I will be accused of being a racist), hit with her car a policeman..there is a video of her, before the strike, who screams ''f** the police''..
    i didn't see any protests..
    sure, random crime = institutional racism. totes the same.
    I want reform, which should happen, you can't bash every cop that's out there though.
    I don't. 
    You're rational though.  There are people that give no F's though.  If Trump could start a riot on the Capitol why couldn't groups of people fully turn on police? A more national scale like seattle had.
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