The Vietnam War on PBS

If you're not watching it, you should.
09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL;

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Comments

  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 6,436
    I read on the Porch that it can be streamed from the PBS website for free, for those who don't have another way to watch it. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 21,351
    edited September 22
    For anyone younger than 55, I would say probably a good idea.  But having lived through that era, I have a really hard time watching or reading anything about that war.  The only exception in recent years was reading Bill Zimmerman's excellent book, Troublemaker.


    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • brianlux said:
    For anyone younger than 55, I would say probably a good idea.  But having lived through that era, I have a really hard time watching or reading anything about that war.  The only exception in recent years was reading Bill Zimmerman's excellent book, Troublemaker.



    Dispatches was a pretty good book on this subject as well.

    I forgot about this event. I'll look to check it out.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • You might also read, "They Marched Into Sunlight," to get some perspective on recent events starting in 2003.

    Brian, I can understand and don't blame you. Thanks for the recommendation.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL;

    "If you're looking down on someone, it better be to extend them a hand to lift them up."

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  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 21,351
    You might also read, "They Marched Into Sunlight," to get some perspective on recent events starting in 2003.

    Brian, I can understand and don't blame you. Thanks for the recommendation.
    Anytime, H2M. 

    And thanks for the thread on an important part of our history.
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • CM189191CM189191 Minneapolis via ChicagoPosts: 3,265
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    WI 6/27/98 WI 10/8/00 MO 10/11/00 IL 4/23/03 MN 6/26/06 MN 6/27/06 WI 6/30/06 IL 8/5/07 IL 8/21/08 (EV) IL 8/22/08 (EV) IL 8/23/09 IL 8/24/09 IN 5/7/10 IL 6/28/11 (EV) IL 6/29/11 (EV) WI 9/3/11 WI 9/4/11 IL 7/19/13 NE 10/09/14 IL 10/17/14 MN 10/19/14 FL 4/11/16 IL 8/20/16 IL 8/22/16
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 21,351
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 21,351
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.*  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.

    *I was lucky.  I only got as far as the physical at the cattle herding recruiting station in Oakland then given a number and watched my turn grow closer and closer.  I was two or three numbers out of 365 away from getting called up when the war ended.  Sheer dumb luck.

    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • I'd be interested.  Thanks.

    @brianlux did you ever read "Chickenhawk"?
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 12,575
    The things they carried is also a great book from a grunt's perspective.
    I've caught bits and pieces of this series and so far so good.
    anybody remember "letters home from vietnam"?  that was intense!
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 10,772
    I watched some but it was pretty tough to watch. 
    I was fascinated by this time period when I was in High School and read lots on it...and spoke at length to many veterans of the conflict.  Some crazy shares.
    I did get 'stuck' the other night when I intended to go to sleep...but as stated, it was pretty tough to watch.
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  • tbergstbergs Posts: 3,039
    mcgruff10 said:
    The things they carried is also a great book from a grunt's perspective.
    I've caught bits and pieces of this series and so far so good.
    anybody remember "letters home from vietnam"?  that was intense!
    I remember letters home as a kid. My dad had it on VHS and would put it on some Sunday mornings. Very serious content and nothing like all the movies being put out at the time.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • benjsbenjs Toronto, ONPosts: 6,935
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.*  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.

    *I was lucky.  I only got as far as the physical at the cattle herding recruiting station in Oakland then given a number and watched my turn grow closer and closer.  I was two or three numbers out of 365 away from getting called up when the war ended.  Sheer dumb luck.

    My dad was several more numbers away, but moved to Canada before then. To this day I'm still not sure whether that as a draft-dodging attempt, or a move to be with family that had all moved here even before the war. In any case, he was a photographer for his college and still gets choked up hearing songs like Ohio. Being in Vietnam together as a family a few years back was a visibly traumatic experience for him. 
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  • I'd be interested.  Thanks.

    @brianlux did you ever read "Chickenhawk"?

    I read it. Good book.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 4,131
    My cousin was in the lottery as well. We would listen to the news on the radio each night with dinner and my mother would always get very nervous when they announced the numbers.
    Had he been picked he was going to leave the country to live with relatives in Canada or South Africa. Luckily it never came to that.
  • CM189191CM189191 Minneapolis via ChicagoPosts: 3,265
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.
    That may have been how it ended.  But ego put us there in the first place, and kept us there far longer than we should have been.  
    WI 6/27/98 WI 10/8/00 MO 10/11/00 IL 4/23/03 MN 6/26/06 MN 6/27/06 WI 6/30/06 IL 8/5/07 IL 8/21/08 (EV) IL 8/22/08 (EV) IL 8/23/09 IL 8/24/09 IN 5/7/10 IL 6/28/11 (EV) IL 6/29/11 (EV) WI 9/3/11 WI 9/4/11 IL 7/19/13 NE 10/09/14 IL 10/17/14 MN 10/19/14 FL 4/11/16 IL 8/20/16 IL 8/22/16
  • RoleModelsinBlood31RoleModelsinBlood31 Austin TXPosts: 3,115
    CM189191 said:
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.
    That may have been how it ended.  But ego put us there in the first place, and kept us there far longer than we should have been.  
    Even in the art of war ego is discussed as what leads to most wars.  It wasn't just Vietnam- almost every war in human history can be traced to back to ego.  It's not the U.S., it's human.
    I had a false belief I thought I came here to stay. We're all just visitors.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 21,351
    benjs said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.*  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.

    *I was lucky.  I only got as far as the physical at the cattle herding recruiting station in Oakland then given a number and watched my turn grow closer and closer.  I was two or three numbers out of 365 away from getting called up when the war ended.  Sheer dumb luck.

    My dad was several more numbers away, but moved to Canada before then. To this day I'm still not sure whether that as a draft-dodging attempt, or a move to be with family that had all moved here even before the war. In any case, he was a photographer for his college and still gets choked up hearing songs like Ohio. Being in Vietnam together as a family a few years back was a visibly traumatic experience for him. 
    I considered moving to Canada myself but I had no connections and Canada was beginning to strongly discourage and make very difficult immigration from the U.S.

    I'd be interested.  Thanks.

    @brianlux did you ever read "Chickenhawk"?
    No, have not.  I've seen it come through the store several times.  I might check it out.  What did you like (or dislike) about it?
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 21,351
    CM189191 said:
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.
    That may have been how it ended.  But ego put us there in the first place, and kept us there far longer than we should have been.  
    I just think of ego as a more individual characteristic.  But I guess if you want to call our involvement in Vietnam "ego", OK,  but who's ego?  Not most of the people I knew, both of my generation and my parents.  Resistance to the war was common from early on. We put our necks on the line.  Some protesters were killed (Ohio) doing so. I remember the horrible sight of tactical squad police decked out in black moving in on horseback with helmets, clubs, guns, mace.  Some scary shit.    The war was propagated by the industrial military complex, not the people. 

    In any case, I'm sure we agree the war was a travesty.  And that we haven't learned more than we have about poking our noses into everyone's business is an equal travesty.

    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • LizardLizard So CalPosts: 11,809
    Been watching as difficult as it is

    Usual great work from Ken Burns and staff....

    Is it over yet? #ITMFA
  • my2handsmy2hands Posts: 12,966
    If you're not watching it, you should.

  • brianlux said:
    benjs said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.*  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.

    *I was lucky.  I only got as far as the physical at the cattle herding recruiting station in Oakland then given a number and watched my turn grow closer and closer.  I was two or three numbers out of 365 away from getting called up when the war ended.  Sheer dumb luck.

    My dad was several more numbers away, but moved to Canada before then. To this day I'm still not sure whether that as a draft-dodging attempt, or a move to be with family that had all moved here even before the war. In any case, he was a photographer for his college and still gets choked up hearing songs like Ohio. Being in Vietnam together as a family a few years back was a visibly traumatic experience for him. 
    I considered moving to Canada myself but I had no connections and Canada was beginning to strongly discourage and make very difficult immigration from the U.S.

    I'd be interested.  Thanks.

    @brianlux did you ever read "Chickenhawk"?
    No, have not.  I've seen it come through the store several times.  I might check it out.  What did you like (or dislike) about it?
    First account details of a Huey pilot in Vietnam.  It's a very good read.
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 3,310
    Very sad stuff. My dad dodged it.  Minorities didnt exactly get preferential treatment in the jungle so im glad he did.  Much respect to the guys who had to go tho.  Very unnecessary and the ones who came home were treated like shit by their own generation. 
    ISO:  2010 Hartford AP
  • xavier mcdanielxavier mcdaniel Somewhere in NYCPosts: 8,206
    I've watched the first two episodes and have others to catch up to. So I'm only up to the backstory and the first few years, but it's very good
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  • SmellymanSmellyman AsiaPosts: 2,884
    I hope I would've gone all Ali if I was alive then.



    "Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights?" Ali asked.

    "I ain't got no quarrel with them Viet Cong,"


  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 21,351
    Very sad stuff. My dad dodged it.  Minorities didnt exactly get preferential treatment in the jungle so im glad he did.  Much respect to the guys who had to go tho.  Very unnecessary and the ones who came home were treated like shit by their own generation. 
    Yep, minorities got royally screwed during the Vietnam war, especially blacks.  And yes, when they came home they did get treated like shit by both my generation, boomers, and my parents', the G.I. generation.  Our leaders at the time were mostly G.I. generation- a mar on their reputation for being the greatest generation.  
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • And the pendulum swings..now all are heroes....regardless of the atrocities that become one as a soldier's duty when uninformed enforcement is the law...all doing the best we can with what we know now....
  • Gern BlanstenGern Blansten Your Mom'sPosts: 6,573
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.
    That may have been how it ended.  But ego put us there in the first place, and kept us there far longer than we should have been.  
    I just think of ego as a more individual characteristic.  But I guess if you want to call our involvement in Vietnam "ego", OK,  but who's ego?  Not most of the people I knew, both of my generation and my parents.  Resistance to the war was common from early on. We put our necks on the line.  Some protesters were killed (Ohio) doing so. I remember the horrible sight of tactical squad police decked out in black moving in on horseback with helmets, clubs, guns, mace.  Some scary shit.    The war was propagated by the industrial military complex, not the people. 

    In any case, I'm sure we agree the war was a travesty.  And that we haven't learned more than we have about poking our noses into everyone's business is an equal travesty.

    It was the governments ego that they were worried about.  Johnson/McNamara didn't want the USA to "lose" on their watch to a bunch of Vietnamese farmers.  

    I didn't realize that some congressmen were so vocally against the war back then.  This is a great documentary.
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  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 1,729
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.
    My dad enlisted and volunteered. Not because he was patriotic and gung-ho about the war, but because he couldn't take waiting for his number to be called.
    he dropped out of college after 2 years and got his AA because he didn't want to go get drafted mid-semester. He couldn't get a real job because no one would hire a 19-year-old without a family who's number will get called any day.
    so instead of the waiting game he enlisted, with the idea the sooner he goes the sooner he'd be back to start his life.
    The ironic thing was he was never sent anywhere after boot camp. His theory is the small band of volunteers were so rare they were just forgotten about over the thousands of draftees that were being sent daily.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 21,351
    mace1229 said:
    brianlux said:
    CM189191 said:
    If you're not watching it, you should.
    This is true. Watch. Deja vu. American ego on full display. 
    American ego?  Maybe American Military Industrial Complex imperialist ego, but this was not a war that was popular with the American public. Not at all.   Some folks were gung-ho, yes, but most, no.  I know a guy was a typical gung-ho young American who went into the service and into that war with all sorts of patriotic aspirations but came back from Nam with a gut load of scars as well as a head load of psychological scarring.  There were many like him.  The rest went because they were inducted and forced to go.  I would not describe that war as quintessentially American ego.
    My dad enlisted and volunteered. Not because he was patriotic and gung-ho about the war, but because he couldn't take waiting for his number to be called.
    he dropped out of college after 2 years and got his AA because he didn't want to go get drafted mid-semester. He couldn't get a real job because no one would hire a 19-year-old without a family who's number will get called any day.
    so instead of the waiting game he enlisted, with the idea the sooner he goes the sooner he'd be back to start his life.
    The ironic thing was he was never sent anywhere after boot camp. His theory is the small band of volunteers were so rare they were just forgotten about over the thousands of draftees that were being sent daily.
    I don't remember that option ever crossing my mind but I can see it.  Some guys signed up for ROTC so they could become officers and thus less likely to end up on the front lines (though that was no guarantee).  I pretty much just waited it out.  I had a student deferment for awhile but  I was young and had poor coping skills, so I drank, got wasted a lot.  Between that and work time taking away from studies, my grades went to hell so I dropped out of school and went into full-blown anxiety waiting to get drafted.  My number got so close- I was in full freak-out mode.   I  ended up being just plain lucky.  That, for me, was the so called glorious days of peace and love.  Depressing freakin' times those.  For me, the mid to late 70's and on were so much better.
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
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