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*** Manchester, UK Fanviews Here 6.25.24 ***

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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    edited June 29
    Give-Away area




    Post edited by D-Day on
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    kbcvgkbcvg Cincinnati, OH Posts: 1
    edited July 1
    Sitting in an Irish Pub in the Tiergarten, just got an e-mail informing that both Berlin concerts are canceled. Hope Ed is OK. Really hope so, built quite a trip based on this tour, have tickets in Barcelona also.
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    CharlotteKCharlotteK UK Posts: 3
    This was the first time I've seen PJ live - there's no point regretting that or the various unfortunate reasons for it - I'm just very grateful to have finally got the opportunity, especially now with all the cancellations. The band are not young anymore, and neither am I. When Ten landed I was 20, at Uni and music was everything to me. Despite being drunk for 70% of it, that year is still one of the most memorable of my life and PJ have been a part of the soundtrack ever since. 

    I'm amazed Ed got through the whole show as well as he did. He was clearly sick and struggling, but he not only stuck it out the end, he gave it all he had and sounded pretty good for the most part. Mike was incredible - the solos were just fantastic and I thoroughly enjoyed those. I wasn't in the ten club when I bought tickets for me and my husband, within an hour of them all going on sale in Feb. The best I could get for my budget was high up in Tier 3 and well, I'll just say never again in that venue. The sound wasn't great, and neither was the atmosphere - and none of that is the band's fault. We managed to get part of our block up and moving for the encore by screaming and dancing like utter nut jobs, still lots of people sitting and barely moving. Maybe that's because it was so precipitous - we were like mountain goats dancing on a steep narrow ledge or perhaps we were just full of bravado after a few cheeky tins of cider on the way up and some extortionately priced beer. Was a bit irritating that so many better seats were released so much cheaper later on, but again, there's absolutely no point dwelling on it.

    We had a bloody fantastic night. The set list was awesome - am so happy they played Present Tense, Elderly Woman and Inside Job, as well as the Ten hits. Black was soooooo good. The band were 100% committed and you could see and hear that they pulled out all the stops to put on the best possible show they could so in that respect, I don't think I could have asked for or expected more.
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    edited July 4
    in fact it is possible to walk from the back to the front on tier 3.
    no idea whether there was staff around before or during the running gig - if not: an upgrade of the own seat was an easy task here - even two seats next to each other was not impossible - three seats next to me were emty. 
    The seats at the very front on both sides were unused/covered (see tier 1 on pic 2 - same on tier 3 on my side)
    shot right after the show - missed to upgrade my seat - never thought this could be possible before it was too late.
    Post edited by D-Day on
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    lastexitlondonlastexitlondon Posts: 12,978
    I see me in the second picture 
    brixton 93
    astoria 06
    albany 06
    hartford 06
    reading 06
    barcelona 06
    paris 06
    wembley 07
    dusseldorf 07
    nijmegen 07

    this song is meant to be called i got shit,itshould be called i got shit tickets-hartford 06 -
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    🤣
    World Freak Show


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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278

    Very good one…


    Sickness, soaring ticket prices and setlist changes: not even the curse of Co-Op Live can stop Pearl Jam at their chaotic but ultimately triumphant Manchester show…

    Eddie Vedder might be soundtrack stricken with illness, but a vocal crowd help make Pearl Jam's Manchester show a success against the odds.
    It's been 30 years since Pearl Jam went to war with Ticketmaster, but it looks like the ticketing giant has got the last laugh. Headlines in the week leading up to the band's UK tour speak of fan dismay as ticket prices for the London show plummeted from as high as £238 [for "premium standing"] to less than £50, highlighting a plain and simple truth: dynamic ticket pricing - where ticket prices fluxuate depending on demand - is a fucking racket. Add them to the "Lars was right“ pile. 
    Still, ticket price woes seemingly haven't had a major impact on the band's ability to pack out Manchester's Co Op Live arena. Not so much storming out as coalescing around Of The Girl, it's a gentle intro that nonetheless gets the crowd roaring vociferously, meandering instrumentals giving the band the chance to warm up and show off their musicianship while frontman Eddie Vedder clings to the mic stand like it's the only thing tethering him to the earth. 
    Or, as it turns out, possibly crashing to it. Whatever cursed burial site was disturbed to facilitate the venue's building, Co Op Live has had a rough run in its early stages. Show postponements, cancellations and at one point an air conditioning unit falling from the ceiling kept the venue from opening, and while the angry deity that clearly had it out for the space has since been appeased enough for a few shows, Eddie Vedder gets no such pass as he admits early on he got sick after the band's show in Dublin earlier this week and is struggling.  
    Pointing out into the crowd, he highlights a couple up front who proclaim that they were in a car crash yesterday, but still made the show. "Well, I can't let the sniffles compare to that, can I?" he jokes. 
    For the softer songs in the set, you'd barely notice. Although croaky and at times incoherent between songs, Vedder's voice is as soulful and powerful as ever on ballads like Present Tense, Given To Fly and Elderley Woman Behind The Counter In A Small Town, the latter bolstered by the sounds of thousands of fans spiritedly singing along. 
    But the faster songs obviously suffer. Why Go ends up being particularly chaotic as Vedder seems to miss his vocal cue, coming in just off the beat and occasionally dropping out to catch his breath. The band clearly notice, and the instrumentals are stretched out to give the singer some space, guitarist Mike McCready putting on some extra razzle to fill the gap. 
    That doesn't mean the faster songs are a total disaster, though. Lost Dogs track All Night hits with a punkish, punchy energy, while a slew of cuts from this year's Dark Matter including Scared Of Fear and React, Respond highlight that album's reinvigorated energy. Vedder doesn't shy from admitting how his health is impacting the show, either; a quiet discussion between the band side-stage sees them opt for slower number Immortality and it looks for a moment like they'll sidestep anthem Even Flow as they start it up and abandon it, only to be regaled with half-hearted boos from the crowd that see Vedder chuckle and acquiesce. 
    Pearl Jam's well-established streak of being utterly unpredictable with setlists remains true. Introducing I Got ID as "a song we wrote with Neil Young", they break out some obscure numbers throughout the set, even side-stepping longterm live favourite Rockin' In The Free World for fellow Neil Young cover Fuckin' Up.
    Initially departing on Porch, it doesn't feel outside the realms of possibility that the band won't make it back, particularly as the encore gap seems to stretch on. But the band power through and seem to hit a groove for the closing run. Starting with an emotional Inside Job, the pace picks up for both State Of Love And Trust and Do The Evolution, the latter's Todd McFarlane-directed music video put to great use on the massive screens above the stage while Vedder seems especially energetic and fired up after a break. 
    All the struggles and stutters pay off with a Ten one-two. The crowd roar along to wistful love ballad Black, while Alive lives up to its reputation for taking a dark turn and transforming it into something inspirational as 20,000+ people take the roof off the venue singing along, grasping the slightest sliver of victory and turning it into an undeniable triumph. 
    As the house lights come up and the band continue to play - a common occurence - with Fuckin' Up and Yellow Ledbetter, Vedder thanks the crowd for "keeping him up", even pouring wine into glasses for the front row. It adds to a sense of communal joy that has long defined the experience of being a Pearl Jam fan, the Black line "We belong together" never ringing more true than when the crowd can help elevate an otherwise difficult gig. Now, about those ticket prices... 

    By Rich Hobson (loudersound) published 26 June 2024


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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    Battling the unforeseeable circumstances on stage in Manchester could easily lead to a special plus on the bootleg - more pure instrumental live bits than on others.
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    CharlotteKCharlotteK UK Posts: 3
    D-Day said:
    Battling the unforeseeable circumstances on stage in Manchester could easily lead to a special plus on the bootleg - more pure instrumental live bits than on others.
    Exactly why I'm going to get it. The instrumental parts were absolutely fantastic.
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    edited July 8
    Special view on The Co-op Arena incl. a lot of details incl. Two Pints and PJ as closer…

    I returned to Co-op Live two months after its disastrous opening and here’s how much it has changed:
    As I took my seat for Pearl Jam’s headline set at Manchester’s Co-op Live arena, I couldn’t help but think back to my first time there. Considering the venue’s troubled launch, it was almost a wonder I was sitting there at all. 
    I was one of the people invited to the arena’s test event on April 20. At that point, we were only allowed into one of the entrance halls and it was standing room only in the bowl itself. The rest of the arena, including the tiered seating and several other club venues within the building, were incomplete.
    As us journalists were given a tour of the completed areas of the venue and waited for Rick Astley to take the stage, thousands of people outside received emails that their tickets for the special occasion had been cancelled. This was the first warning sign that something was awry at the Co-op Live.
    The following weeks saw cancelled gigs, a resignation, multiple health and safety issues and headline acts rescheduling shows to the rival AO arena.
    But this was all just a distant memory for me and the thousands of Pearl Jam fans in the arena last night. There is no doubt Co-op Live has come a long way since its nightmarish opening. Here’s what we thought of the venue, two months on. 
    Getting to Co-op Live
    The Co-op Live experience starts long before you’ve entered the building. A lot of money has been spent on transport and travel infrastructure to make sure people can safely enter and exit the campus, which the arena shares with the Etihad stadium. The CityLink walking route from Holt Town alone cost £4m. From what I could see, there were plenty of people choosing this option but most people seemed to be travelling by Metrolink, which all seemed rammed.
    I was lucky enough to get a lift on this occasion, but as a Tameside resident, I am fully aware of how packed this tram route gets when there’s a match or a gig on. Luckily, it’s only a few minutes from the city centre. 
    There were stewards holding signposts every few metres inside the campus offering help to anyone who seemed lost or confused, like me. It did not take long to get my bearings though and as I approached the big black cube of a building, I was greeted with the welcome sight of an outdoor bar. This was a feature of the arena I was unaware of and it was a pleasant surprise, as was the canal-side seating area where I went to enjoy my pint and wait for my companion to arrive.

    Inside Co-op Live - food, drink and the loos
    Getting inside the arena was quick and easy for us. There was no queue for our entrance, which was for one of the seated blocks. The queue for standing ticket-holders, on the other hand, was much longer although seemed to be moving on quickly enough. 
    Our priority on entering was food. There are kiosks throughout the arena selling hot and cold snacks, all with self-service checkouts. We went for a hot dog, a totally normal arena snack, but you can also get pasties, chips, confectionery, canned drinks both soft and alcoholic. There is something a bit strange about seeing a mini Co-op supermarket in a venue like this, but well-received if you’re rushing to a mid-week gig straight from the office, for example.
    The price-list was one of the things that caused controversy when the arena first opened, and not much has changed in that regard. A Tango and hot dog cost around £14, less than our two pints cost. 
    Because so much of the arena was closed off during my first visit, it took a few minutes to figure out where our seats were, but we were able to use the maps and stewards for help. Spread across four levels, it struck me how vast it really is on the side. My companion, who has recently come back from a weekend in Paris, said it felt like being in Charles de Gaulle airport, especially with the amount of facilities each floor has.
    In general, the facilities at Co-op Live were fairly impressive – I didn’t have to queue too long for anything, the toilets were clean, the bars were well-stocked. I’m a seasoned gig-goer, used to much smaller venues than this and there is nothing worse than needing the loo halfway through the set. I’m an expert at darting in and out of the crowd as quickly as possible and finding my friends quickly afterwards. So when I needed the ladies’ room during Pearl Jam, I braced myself for the journey, but the toilets were directly outside the entrance to our seats, which were also easy to find.
    In fact, I managed to go to the loo, buy a pint and a sausage roll, which my companion tried to eat discreetly in between flashes from the light show, in half a song. A mid-gig sausage roll was definitely a first for both of us and definitely made us chuckle. 
    The seats were as comfortable as you’d expect arena seats to be, although not much legroom if you’re tall. Our side of the arena remained seated but our counterparts on the other side of the stage were all on their feet anyway. It’s worth noting that while it was hot and muggy outside, it was comfortably cool inside the arena. 
    Another thing that struck me about the Co-op Live was the sheer amount of people it takes to run an event there. It felt like there was an army of staff involved in the whole operation – from the bartenders to toilet attendants. Hopefully this is a good example of a new development providing real opportunities for the people of Manchester. 
    What about Pearl Jam?
    One of the things I noted in my first ever review of the Co-op Live was that, despite all the unfinished paint jobs and hanging wires, the sound in the bowl is actually very good. And although I am no expert, luckily my companion, a sound engineer, definitely knew what he was talking about and agreed with me. 
    Pearl Jam were the perfect band to test the credentials of the state-of-the-art arena. The nineties grunge heroes are very much at home in a venue of this scale. They have a powerful, clean sound and each instrument, including Eddie Vedder’s legendary vocals, sounded crisp. We were sat to the left of the stage, so it was difficult to say how it sounded at the back or from the floor, but there did not seem to be any complaints from the audience, who were enthralled by the band’s performance from start to finish. The stage set-up was also slightly different from my first visit as Pearl Jam made use of the full screen behind them. The show included live closeups of the band and impressive graphics that complemented most of the songs. Tickets for Co-op Live, and most venues these days, are not cheap. My companion’s colleague had looked at getting a last-minute ticket but was put off by the £180 price tag. (💡That price can‘t be a REAL Last Minute price - sounds more like a 1-X Day/s Before Showday price;)))) The venue was mostly full, save for a few patches near the back in the top tiers, which shows that dedicated fans are prepared to pay for these big-name bands that Co-op Live are aiming to showcase. Ultimately, whether or not it’s worth money depends on how much you love the artist you’re watching. But there’s nothing to be disappointed about in terms of production value. By Sofia Fedeczko (ManchesterWorld) Published 27th Jun 2024


    Post edited by D-Day on
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    EraserheadEraserhead Stoke-on-Trent Posts: 2,909
    Waited 32 years to see Pearl Jam. Joined this fan club some years ago to improve odds of actually getting tickets and made the not inconsiderable journey to Manchester. Was hoping for Present Tense and got it.  Got in early enough to stand about 15m back from the stage

    However, ultimately I wasn't blown away as hoped. I thought it was a fairly average band performance and the sound was not good at all.  Not even close to my top ten gigs. Given the cost of tickets, travel & accommodation, I doubt I'd make the same effort again. 
    Everyone is devastated that you won’t make the same effort again. You and your effort will be missed. 

    That made me laugh more than it should!  Haha, brilliant
    Manchester 04.06.00, Leeds 25.08.06, Wembley 18.06.07, Dusseldorf 21.06.07, Shepherds Bush 11.08.09, Manchester 17.08.09, Adelaide 17.11.09, Melbourne 20.11.09, Sydney 22.11.09, Brisbane 25.11.09, MSG1 20.05.10, MSG2 21.05.10, Dublin 22.06.10, Belfast 23.06.10, London 25.06.10, Long Beach 06.07.11 (EV), Los Angeles 08.07.11 (EV), Toronto 11.09.11, Toronto 12.09.11, Ottawa 14.09.11, Hamilton 14.09.11, Manchester 20.06.12, Manchester 21.06.12, Amsterdam 26.06.2012, Amsterdam 27.06.2012, Berlin 04.07.12, Berlin 05.07.12, Stockholm 07.07.12, Oslo 09.07.12, Copenhagen 10.07.12, Manchester 28.07.12 (EV), Brooklyn 18.10.13, Brooklyn 19.10.13, Philly 21.10.13, Philly 22.10.13, San Diego 21.11.13, LA 23.11.13, LA 24.11.13, Oakland 26.11.13, Portland 29.11.13, Spokane 30.11.13, Calgary 02.12.13, Vancouver 04.12.13, Seattle 06.12.13, Trieste 22.06.14, Vienna 25.06.14, Berlin 26.06.14, Stockholm 28.06.14, Leeds 08.07.14, Philly 28.04.16, Philly 28.04.16, MSG1 01.05.16, MSG2 02.05.16
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    1992+32=60 💡 
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    MojoJojoMojoJojo Posts: 34
    edited July 9

    We hit some hectic traffic about a 2 miles from the hotel, I thought it was about time we put on some Pearl Jam.  Strangely enough these last miles took nearly an hour so we got our Jam on, needless to say I started to cry thinking about how this was going to be our 11th concert.  Growing up in South Africa I never thought I’d ever get the chance to see them Once, let alone double digits!  Hence the emotion attached to seeing my favourite band of all time.


    We got to the hotel, dropped our bags and grabbed an uber to the Co-Op Live.  Walking from the uber drop off we immediately started seeing the familiar sight of Pearl Jam t-shirts.  After the pricing issues (which we won’t get into here) I was very pleased we got early entry to the venue, which as usual gave us a great spot up front.  


    Can’t say I was that enamoured with The Murder Capital, but then again any band that comes on before PJ would have a hard time convincing me to enjoy myself when I’m purely there for the main attraction.  Thankfully the banter with other PJ faithful kept me going.


    I had discussed my thoughts on opening number with another PJ fan speculating that Of The Girl would be a great choice and lone behold the lights dimmed and the familiar chords emanated.  Being one of my (plethora of) favourites I was a very happy girl.  Queue Present Tense - again another track I’d hoped they’d play and we’d discussed in the car on the way.  Glancing at Miguel words were not necessary to convey the excitement and pure thankfulness at hearing this track.


    Given to Fly at Hyde Park 2010 was simply transcendental with the beautiful moon, inside the Co-Op we loved it just as much.  Eddie told us he wasn’t feeling well and I was seriously scared they’d cut the show short, but he went on, supported by an enthusiastic crowd singing chorus after chorus with Elderly Woman.


    Eddie tried to get out of Even Flow, thankfully the band played it because Mike was on fire, what a solo!!  


    The sound from the front was great, although I’ve heard those in other sections, especially in the seated areas higher up, wasn’t so great.  I was in my element, I feel so alive when I’m at a PJ concert; jumping around and dancing like there was no tomorrow.  When they started I Got Shit I started crying (and I’m not one to cry believe it or not, unless you bump into me at a PJ gig).  Straight into Once and Porch and I was jumping around again like a crazy - at 42 years old I’m perhaps a bit old for all this exertion but we only live once and my goodness I’m going to enjoy every moment.


    We waited patiently for their encore and Inside Job was absolutely just perfect, it’s one of our favourites, we were both in tears and holding hands.  SOLAT is again an all time favourite - yes this was an immense set list for me (and for us), when Do The Evolution came on I was gone “hold my bag” I asked handing my bag to Miguel so I could go mad and rock out barefoot (slip slops are my go to and there’s nothing better than feeling the ground under your feet when dancing to your favourite band).  


    Finishing off with Yellow Ledbeter - my favourite song in the whole world - was the cherry on the cake for me.


    An epic gig by the best band in the world, makes the journey from Cape Town totally worth it; Daughter, Immortality, Black, Why Go - even if I didn’t get to see them on the Saturday in London (not my first cancellation either).  I just hope the band are okay.  I’ll be eternally grateful for the music and another immense gig from amazing musicians that have meant so much to me since I was a young girl.  Thank-you Pearl Jam!!!  I can’t wait for the next time.  


    Some footage I took of the gig:

    https://youtu.be/1K8FH6Lylf4?si=PaMBW5ddUoJmg0jI

    https://youtu.be/d-fcUrrfqdY?si=SIWNoX_qxKFNBO1l

    Post edited by MojoJojo on
    Wembley Arena 2007;
    O2 Arena 2009;
    Hyde Park 2010,
    Manchester 20 June 2012
    Manchester 21 June 2012
    Amsterdam 26 June 2012
    Amsterdam 27 June 2012
    Leeds 2014
    Milton Keynes 2014
    London 19 June 2018
    Hyde Park 9 July 2022
    Manchester 2024
    London 29 June 2024
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    CharlotteKCharlotteK UK Posts: 3
    Some footage I took of the gig:
    Thanks for these! I was up at the top in the back so great to see a different view 😀 
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    edited July 7
    another view on Manchester

    Pearl Jam: the perfect sandwich filling from Co-op Live

    Pearl Jam took to a fairly underlit stage and played the laid-back ‘Of The Girl’ which set a strange casual atmosphere to start the show, this was a strange way to start but it was interesting. The low lighting made it feel much more intimate and gentle. 
    Spacey atmosphere aside, everyone was here for a rock show and Pearl Jam brought out some of their biggest hits from all of their career defining albums. Many people in the audience would have been happy with a set that focused on Ten or Vitalogy but the inclusion of deeper cuts like ‘I Got ID’ and ‘All Night’. 
    Ten has always been Pearl Jam’s most beloved album and this set was full of classic tracks from the 1991 classic. ‘Why Go‘ is a near-perfect rock song and its inclusion early on in the set was a wise choice considering how easily recognisable the opening drum pattern is. Guitarist Mike McCready gets his chance to show Manchester what he can do and unsurprisingly, the man can still rip. Mike throws in every rock guitar trick he can think of as he channels his guitar hero Jimi Hendrix by playing with his teeth, making brilliant guitar faces and just wailing like an absolute madman. 
    Pearl Jam have been unfairly written off as a band that stopped making good music once the ’90s ended, which is completely untrue. Dark Matter contains some of the bands strongest material with tracks like ‘Don’t React,’ ‘Respond’ and ‘Scared Of Fear’ harkening back to that early 90s feeling without coming off dated or desperate to recapture something they’d lost. In a live setting, these songs work brilliantly and you can tell the band really enjoy playing these new songs as frontman Eddie Vedder yarls and dances around the strangely small stage of Co-op Live. 
    Absolutely everyone was waiting for the classic iconic riff and vocal performance that made Pearl Jam a household name in rock. The early 90s saw countless impressions by Adam Sandler and airplay on MTV and the 2000s saw its inclusion in Guitar Hero 3, this song has been a cultural staple since it came out and it shows no signs of going away, ‘Even Flow’. Everyone has an impression of Eddie Vedder singing this song and that’s likely why he switched up his delivery. I can imagine he’s become bored performing this song over the past 30 years but he still gives it his all. The flow isn’t quite even but it’s close enough. 
    Eddie mentioned he caught something in Dublin and you can tell in places, that the mumbling and incoherent nature of his vocals make it hard to tell anything is wrong but he missed cues and seemed to move away from the mic at the wrong times. These moments were brief and easy to ignore but you could definitely tell he wasn’t well. The band still got through an impressive catalogue of rock classics including the sing-along ‘Daughter,’ the haunting epic ‘Black’ and the greatest guitar solo of the 90s, ‘Alive’.
    A personal favourite of the show was ‘Do The Evolution’ which featured the maximalist music video directed by Kevin Altieri of Batman: The Animated Series fame and Todd McFarlane of Spawn. I had never seen this music video somehow and this whole section showed just how much work visuals at a show can put in to make a song feel alive and energised. This may be fairly obvious but Pearl Jam can be made more interesting by including dinosaurs and goth girls, who knew? The show ended with the famously obtuse ‘Yellow Leadbetter,’ a song full of beautiful melodies and Hendrix-inspired guitar work and gorgeous vocals from one of the most unique voices in music. This track was a sweet ending as the lights went up and everyone slowly shifted their way to the exits knowing they’d experienced a real rock show. 
    Pearl Jam are a band that honed their skills over the years to craft a grand stage show that doesn’t rely on gimmicks or pyrotechnics or wacky waving arm flailing inflatable tube men. They relied purely on the stage of their chemistry and their back catalogue and it has always paid off for them throughout the years. Pearl Jam was my first concert back and seeing them again while knowing so much more about live music was a rewarding experience and hopefully it won’t take another 15 years to see them. Maybe next time they’ll play ‘Jeremy’ as well. 

    by Lamestream Lydia (Ramzine UK)
    June 28, 2024


    Post edited by D-Day on
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    Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 10,698
    Unbefuckinglievable night. Current status: 

    This was my initial reaction to the show, and was a bit surprised to hear so many negative, despite Ed having a rough night…. After listening to the bootleg last night & again right now, I feel validated in my original take…. This was a great show. 
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    lastexitlondonlastexitlondon Posts: 12,978
    Great show . That can't be in doubt.
    brixton 93
    astoria 06
    albany 06
    hartford 06
    reading 06
    barcelona 06
    paris 06
    wembley 07
    dusseldorf 07
    nijmegen 07

    this song is meant to be called i got shit,itshould be called i got shit tickets-hartford 06 -
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    Zen23Zen23 Posts: 436
    Just listened to the bootleg. I was a bit afraid that Eddie's singing problems would make it too difficult to listen to. My sympathy, my slight unease dampens the mood a little. Like the night I was there. But every time the audience supports him, stands in for him, I have a grin on my face. They could have turned up the volume for the audience in the mix even more. That coupled with the setlist, the sound and the fact that Eddie kept it going to the end no matter the circumstances make it a nice keepsake.
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    edited July 9
    epic indoor gig in MANCHESTER

    I have seen some yt videos now. 
    This one is one of the very best single pics for an view on the greatness of the arena inclusive. One outstanding plus is the wideness of the floor in front of the stage!
    It’s EVEN FLOW and the video to the pic offers a lot of close ups when the guitar play was on screen in extrem close up. Like DO THE EVOLUTION a top highlight thanks to the screen.
    Post edited by D-Day on
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    MojoJojoMojoJojo Posts: 34
    Some footage I took of the gig:
    Thanks for these! I was up at the top in the back so great to see a different view 😀 
    I'm so pleased you enjoyed them :)
    Wembley Arena 2007;
    O2 Arena 2009;
    Hyde Park 2010,
    Manchester 20 June 2012
    Manchester 21 June 2012
    Amsterdam 26 June 2012
    Amsterdam 27 June 2012
    Leeds 2014
    Milton Keynes 2014
    London 19 June 2018
    Hyde Park 9 July 2022
    Manchester 2024
    London 29 June 2024
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    MojoJojoMojoJojo Posts: 34
    Great show . That can't be in doubt.
    Hundred percent!  Loved every second.
    Wembley Arena 2007;
    O2 Arena 2009;
    Hyde Park 2010,
    Manchester 20 June 2012
    Manchester 21 June 2012
    Amsterdam 26 June 2012
    Amsterdam 27 June 2012
    Leeds 2014
    Milton Keynes 2014
    London 19 June 2018
    Hyde Park 9 July 2022
    Manchester 2024
    London 29 June 2024
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    edited July 9
       just bought

     

    can‘t wait
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    lastexitlondonlastexitlondon Posts: 12,978
    I just noticed the tag in daughter.

    brixton 93
    astoria 06
    albany 06
    hartford 06
    reading 06
    barcelona 06
    paris 06
    wembley 07
    dusseldorf 07
    nijmegen 07

    this song is meant to be called i got shit,itshould be called i got shit tickets-hartford 06 -
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    RobbertRobbert Rotterdam, the Netherlands Posts: 868
    edited July 9
    Sorry answered at the wrong show
    Post edited by Robbert on
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    Zen23Zen23 Posts: 436
    I just noticed the tag in daughter.
    I was the same with Black. I didn't realize that until quite late either. I've been wanting to hear Crown of Thorns live for so long. I know that the probability is very low. Especially in Europe, I'm sure. But at least I got a few seconds of it in Manchester.
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    lastexitlondonlastexitlondon Posts: 12,978
    I was lucky at Milton Keynes to get that. I noticed live the tag but not daughter . I love listening back to all the bits I missed live
    brixton 93
    astoria 06
    albany 06
    hartford 06
    reading 06
    barcelona 06
    paris 06
    wembley 07
    dusseldorf 07
    nijmegen 07

    this song is meant to be called i got shit,itshould be called i got shit tickets-hartford 06 -
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    edited July 10

    BEE SPECIAL


    2£ sticker
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278
    edited July 10

    The story behind the Manchester bee – and why it’s used everywhere in the city.

    There are bees all over Manchester, swarms of those sweetest and busiest of insects are everywhere. Even in the depths of winter they are here, on every bollard and bench, on buildings and bins all over our city.


    The Bee is the symbol of Manchester …

    … and this city of industry is rightly proud of its link with the hard-working insect. In 1842, the early city fathers had to decide on a coat of arms that would tell the world who we were. It was a Victorian branding exercise. They included a globe with seven bees to show how we worked and traded across the seven seas. The Manchester bee was born of industry.
    Manchester’s bee is a worker bee, reflecting a city made by the workers; made by the people, not a city that has grown from royal patronage or easy natural resources. Mancunians have worked hard to make this place thrive.
    The standard bee on our street furniture has been around since the 1970s but most of our bees are 19th century creations. Bee-spotting is a good way to spend time in the city. When you’re strolling the streets, look up, look around and you’ll see them everywhere.
    On the coat of arms on the exterior of Manchester Town Hall - which is currently undertaking a large refurbishment to lovingly return it to its 1868 splendour - you will find the busy worker bees proudly displayed. You’ll see lots of references to cotton on the building, and cotton was the industry that made Manchester rich, the city’s equivalent of honey.
    More bees can be found at Spring Gardens, Hotel Gotham and Zizzi in King Street has a fine traditional beehive in the window that you can view whilst walking past. There is Beehive mill in Ancoats, and St Ann’s Square has oversized 1980s bees opposite the Royal Exchange. Stroll down to the Kimpton Clocktower on Oxford Road and look way up, at the clock face where bees tell the quarter hours. The ancient-and-modern University of Manchester also has three large bee symbols on its coat of arms.
    Manchester claimed the bee because she is an industrious little grafter, individually insignificant but collectively a superorganism. Together we are stronger. And bees are amazing; jaw-droppingly stunning.
    An individual worker bee lives for about three weeks in the busiest summer months. She visits between 50 to 100 flowers on each flight and up to 2,000 flowers daily. As well as producing honey she makes beeswax, propolis (a sort of disinfectant that is plastered around the entrance to the hive) and royal jelly to feed the queen.
    Worker bees are all female whilst the males are called drones. The latter are useful for one thing then they are thrown out of the hive and the females get on with all the work.  Please consider this and draw your own conclusions. Just remember that Manchester is well-known for its strong women! Emmeline Pankhurst, Enriqueta Rylands, Dame Nancy Rothwell, Maxine Peake, to name a few.
    The special thing about the human relationship with bees is that we can control them and exploit their products. Honeybees (Apis mellifera) are the only insects that have been domesticated and have been since at least the days of the ancient Egyptians. Jars of honey were found in the tomb of Tutankhamun.
    The Old English custom of “telling the bees” reflects the close bond between beekeeper and bee-kept. This commands that all major family issues (births, marriages and deaths but general gossip too) must be reported to the bees or they will fly off, die, or fail to produce honey. This could be seen as a quaint old custom or just a way of encouraging that proper attention is paid to the hive.
    And Manchester did not always pay good attention to her adopted insects. One thing we are not so proud of hereabouts is that we practically invented air pollution or, at least, the Industrial Revolution left us with a legacy of biological degradation second to none. 
    We have spent many years rebuilding our environment and connecting back with the wider world around us and this means that our bees are back! There are beehives all around the city, on top of the Cathedral, the PrintworksManchester Art GalleryManchester Central conference centre and even on some commercial buildings around the city.
    These bees are lovingly tended to by volunteers with an evangelical zeal for their new charges. Come the warmer days of spring and summer, real honeybees flit above our heads, busy as Mancunians. Proper Manchester honey can even be bought in some of the associated buildings and their shops. The Manchester and District beekeepers Association has its home at Heaton Park just north of the city where you can see a demonstration hive and get lots of information and advice if you wish to give beekeeping a go.
    We can all help the bees. Even if you don’t think that baggy combination of white canvas and netting is quite your look you can do your bit by putting out food for bees. They need flowers; simple, open flowers from spring to autumn. They like native and exotic species equally; bees aren’t prejudiced, as long as there is nectar, pollen and easy access.
    You can be part of this and grow your own bee-friendly flowers. In the Spring, bees love; rosemary, pussy willow, bluebell, primrose, and Hawthorne. Mid-summer calls for other plants such as; foxglove, honeysuckle, sage, clover, geranium, teasel, and thyme; and bee-friendly plants that grow in late Summer/Autumn include; buddleia, heather, lavender, marjoram, sedum, and Ivy.
    In Manchester, flowers are coming back too. Planters are dotted about, flowering green walls appearing, gardens are springing up in previously unlikely spaces and sympathetic apartment dwellers are planting windowsills and balconies and welcoming the bees. Local people are working together to blur the division between urban and rural and the bees are back.
    Manchester is back too. After many mid-twentieth century years in the doldrums, this city is on a rapid ascent. As well as all the business, sport, culture and conferences, tourists are coming in ever-larger numbers.
    Before the Industrial Revolution bees made honey and people loved it.  Industry turned the world upside down forever. Manchester, the original, modern city was born. Now the city is growing up and linking back to the best bits of the past. Welcome home bees.
    By Anne Beswick
    (VisitManchester)
    Post edited by D-Day on
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    D-DayD-Day Far From Home Posts: 278


    Bin Bee + Sun seen in Manchester on Showday

    Bee Maja (title music video trailer) 
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=96tOPyuhuJs
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