Australia on fire🔥😷

rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
edited January 8 in A Moving Train
As summer hits the battle is getting too much for our firies who have been at it for months now. We have NZ help and now Canada. We need all the support we can get. God help us 😢 this is NSW at the moment. Can barely breathe
https://www.facebook.com/226228487518348/posts/1593624627445387/
Post edited by rhanishane on
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Comments

  • JPPJ84JPPJ84 Hamburg, Germany Posts: 1,470
    my goodness this is devastating!
  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    JPPJ84 said:
    my goodness this is devastating!
    Yes It is. It is like living in a convection oven. 
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 14,724
    Thanks to Gladys for cutting spending on fire services. She has blood on her hands.
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009, Melbourne (Big Day Out Festival) 24/01/2014
  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    frontline property protection footage from today.. i would be interested to see any techniques for fighting fires used in the US if anyone has any links to share?
    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2831093340268448&id=133265153384627
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 14,724
    Feeling sad for the wildlife :(
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009, Melbourne (Big Day Out Festival) 24/01/2014
  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 14,724
    Scary as
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009, Melbourne (Big Day Out Festival) 24/01/2014
  • mfc2006mfc2006 PDX--->KCPosts: 32,358
    Be safe, everyone.

    So sad to see this.
    I LOVE MUSIC.
    www.cluthelee.com
    www.cluthe.com
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 29,632
    We live in a fire hazard prone area so I'm used to hearing about devastating wildfires, but what's happening to Australia is mind boggling.  Very sorry to hear things keep getting worse. 

    Be safe, good thoughts for all our Down Under friends.
    “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
    -Aldous Huxley
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.









  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    Thank you for your kind words it means alot. Today will be another bad day. The message is "don't even fart out there"! We are coming into a heat wave in the next week as well. The ground is dry and crispy. The air quality is like smoking 40 cigarettes a day. If the fire doesn't get us then lung disease will ugghhhh 
  • kce8kce8 Posts: 1,548
    OMG! This is incredibly sad and always shocking!

    I wish we had changed our behaviour at the beginning of the 90s, so that we did not have to deal with such extreme situations today.

    Should not someone tell me once again that this is not the fault of man! :angry:
    But we keep on going like before ... 

    Be safe out there - and my deepest respect to all the firefighters risking their lives everyday.
  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    kce8 said:
    OMG! This is incredibly sad and always shocking!

    I wish we had changed our behaviour at the beginning of the 90s, so that we did not have to deal with such extreme situations today.

    Should not someone tell me once again that this is not the fault of man! :angry:
    But we keep on going like before ... 

    Be safe out there - and my deepest respect to all the firefighters risking their lives everyday.
    totally agree.. land mismanagement in Australia is a tragedy and the fuckers still aren't listening. Scott Morrison out PM has gone into hiding the gutless prick. America is sending 21 wildland personnel to help following the Canadians who arrived yesterday. Thank you so much❤
  • So terrible...friend of the family left.for Australia...helicopter pilot...along with the firefighters from BC...wishing you all stay safe!  peace  and love to you all...
  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    So terrible...friend of the family left.for Australia...helicopter pilot...along with the firefighters from BC...wishing you all stay safe!  peace  and love to you all...
    Amazing thank you tell them we appreciate them so much they are our heroes seriously. seeing those professionals in the air really strikes you with awe!! Need to also thank our NZ neighbours who continue to help us on the ground. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 29,632
    kce8 said:
    OMG! This is incredibly sad and always shocking!

    I wish we had changed our behaviour at the beginning of the 90s, so that we did not have to deal with such extreme situations today.

    Should not someone tell me once again that this is not the fault of man! :angry:
    But we keep on going like before ... 

    Be safe out there - and my deepest respect to all the firefighters risking their lives everyday.
    I agree, kce, but I think we would need to go back at least 100 years to when humans started to suppress natural fire. 

    From what I'm told and have read, when people started moving into drier territories like much of the western US and parts of Australia, we thought we were protecting our homes and lands by suppressing natural fires.  The net result, in many places, has been a huge build up of fuels in the form of shrubs, underbrush and overly crowded trees so that when a fires does break out, the result is catastrophic conflagration. 

    There are really only three ways to deal with this- let the fires burn (bad choice at this point due to too much loss of human and animal life), remove humans from fire sensitive areas and let nature regain her balance (the wisest but least likely choice), or clear brush and low vegetation to reduce the "fire ladder" and thin weaker saplings.  The latter choice is the most likely to succeed at this time in history but to do so properly will take either literally armies of forest workers and/or a very strong effort on individuals to clear properties.  This is what we are working through our fire safety council- to encourage folks to be proactive this way.  (Doing just that kind of work around our place is why I'm currently fighting a bad case of poison oak and have pain in my joints.  Plus I had a Shingrix vaccination yesterday so I'm really not in great shape today, lol!)
    “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
    -Aldous Huxley
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.









  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    brianlux said:
    kce8 said:
    OMG! This is incredibly sad and always shocking!

    I wish we had changed our behaviour at the beginning of the 90s, so that we did not have to deal with such extreme situations today.

    Should not someone tell me once again that this is not the fault of man! :angry:
    But we keep on going like before ... 

    Be safe out there - and my deepest respect to all the firefighters risking their lives everyday.
    I agree, kce, but I think we would need to go back at least 100 years to when humans started to suppress natural fire. 

    From what I'm told and have read, when people started moving into drier territories like much of the western US and parts of Australia, we thought we were protecting our homes and lands by suppressing natural fires.  The net result, in many places, has been a huge build up of fuels in the form of shrubs, underbrush and overly crowded trees so that when a fires does break out, the result is catastrophic conflagration. 

    There are really only three ways to deal with this- let the fires burn (bad choice at this point due to too much loss of human and animal life), remove humans from fire sensitive areas and let nature regain her balance (the wisest but least likely choice), or clear brush and low vegetation to reduce the "fire ladder" and thin weaker saplings.  The latter choice is the most likely to succeed at this time in history but to do so properly will take either literally armies of forest workers and/or a very strong effort on individuals to clear properties.  This is what we are working through our fire safety council- to encourage folks to be proactive this way.  (Doing just that kind of work around our place is why I'm currently fighting a bad case of poison oak and have pain in my joints.  Plus I had a Shingrix vaccination yesterday so I'm really not in great shape today, lol!)
    Oh no you poor thing. I just spent hundreds paying people to clean up the yard from leaf and sticks. I now have a giant bonfire the size of a mini bus ready to go lol
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 29,632
    brianlux said:
    kce8 said:
    OMG! This is incredibly sad and always shocking!

    I wish we had changed our behaviour at the beginning of the 90s, so that we did not have to deal with such extreme situations today.

    Should not someone tell me once again that this is not the fault of man! :angry:
    But we keep on going like before ... 

    Be safe out there - and my deepest respect to all the firefighters risking their lives everyday.
    I agree, kce, but I think we would need to go back at least 100 years to when humans started to suppress natural fire. 

    From what I'm told and have read, when people started moving into drier territories like much of the western US and parts of Australia, we thought we were protecting our homes and lands by suppressing natural fires.  The net result, in many places, has been a huge build up of fuels in the form of shrubs, underbrush and overly crowded trees so that when a fires does break out, the result is catastrophic conflagration. 

    There are really only three ways to deal with this- let the fires burn (bad choice at this point due to too much loss of human and animal life), remove humans from fire sensitive areas and let nature regain her balance (the wisest but least likely choice), or clear brush and low vegetation to reduce the "fire ladder" and thin weaker saplings.  The latter choice is the most likely to succeed at this time in history but to do so properly will take either literally armies of forest workers and/or a very strong effort on individuals to clear properties.  This is what we are working through our fire safety council- to encourage folks to be proactive this way.  (Doing just that kind of work around our place is why I'm currently fighting a bad case of poison oak and have pain in my joints.  Plus I had a Shingrix vaccination yesterday so I'm really not in great shape today, lol!)
    Oh no you poor thing. I just spent hundreds paying people to clean up the yard from leaf and sticks. I now have a giant bonfire the size of a mini bus ready to go lol
    Good job! 

    I told my wife that maybe it's time to hire some help.  Having lacerations, bruises and an itchy rash just aren't my idea of a good time, lol.  I'm pretty sure someone younger could do the work with less injury!
    “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
    -Aldous Huxley
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.









  • So good to tend your own 3 squares...I realize you are dealing with millions and if everyone starts with tending there own and helping their neighbors our rashes won't seem nearly as bad ..good on you Brian lux! Peace and love to all...
  • Burn the bus when you can safely...
  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    Burn the bus when you can safely...
    i will have to have it removed. We cant burn and even our winters have been too warm.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 29,632
    Burn the bus when you can safely...
    i will have to have it removed. We cant burn and even our winters have been too warm.
    Can you rent a chipper and turn it into mulch?
    “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
    -Aldous Huxley
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.









  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    brianlux said:
    Burn the bus when you can safely...
    i will have to have it removed. We cant burn and even our winters have been too warm.
    Can you rent a chipper and turn it into mulch?
    i would rather have it removed off the property professionally. I used to have green lawn 12 months ago its now almost dirt and the gum trees are dropping more than usual being so dry. I cant have mulch as i cant even keep it damp as level 4 water restrictions mean all outside use of water is banned. That would just mean a truck load of flammable fuel in my gardens. I do have a water tank but i would be forever carting it to the trees as my house block is about 2.5 acres in size
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 29,632
    brianlux said:
    Burn the bus when you can safely...
    i will have to have it removed. We cant burn and even our winters have been too warm.
    Can you rent a chipper and turn it into mulch?
    i would rather have it removed off the property professionally. I used to have green lawn 12 months ago its now almost dirt and the gum trees are dropping more than usual being so dry. I cant have mulch as i cant even keep it damp as level 4 water restrictions mean all outside use of water is banned. That would just mean a truck load of flammable fuel in my gardens. I do have a water tank but i would be forever carting it to the trees as my house block is about 2.5 acres in size

    We've had outside watering bans at times during drought as well.  The only exceptions during those bans is we are allowed to water potted plants.  Drought is a pain in the butt (or should I say, arse?!)
    “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
    -Aldous Huxley
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.









  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Burn the bus when you can safely...
    i will have to have it removed. We cant burn and even our winters have been too warm.
    Can you rent a chipper and turn it into mulch?
    i would rather have it removed off the property professionally. I used to have green lawn 12 months ago its now almost dirt and the gum trees are dropping more than usual being so dry. I cant have mulch as i cant even keep it damp as level 4 water restrictions mean all outside use of water is banned. That would just mean a truck load of flammable fuel in my gardens. I do have a water tank but i would be forever carting it to the trees as my house block is about 2.5 acres in size

    We've had outside watering bans at times during drought as well.  The only exceptions during those bans is we are allowed to water potted plants.  Drought is a pain in the butt (or should I say, arse?!)
    gumtrees shed a huge fuel load and are highly flammable as you know. As the videos above show they just explode with the intensity of these fires.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 29,632
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Burn the bus when you can safely...
    i will have to have it removed. We cant burn and even our winters have been too warm.
    Can you rent a chipper and turn it into mulch?
    i would rather have it removed off the property professionally. I used to have green lawn 12 months ago its now almost dirt and the gum trees are dropping more than usual being so dry. I cant have mulch as i cant even keep it damp as level 4 water restrictions mean all outside use of water is banned. That would just mean a truck load of flammable fuel in my gardens. I do have a water tank but i would be forever carting it to the trees as my house block is about 2.5 acres in size

    We've had outside watering bans at times during drought as well.  The only exceptions during those bans is we are allowed to water potted plants.  Drought is a pain in the butt (or should I say, arse?!)
    gumtrees shed a huge fuel load and are highly flammable as you know. As the videos above show they just explode with the intensity of these fires.
    For sure, all of the Eucalypt species are very resinous and messy. Great for making decongestants, bad for fire prone areas! 

    As you probably know, Eucalypts were imported here in the U.S. west during the gold rush era of the mid 1850.  Now they're all over the place at lower elevations- none here at 2000 ft./ 609 meters elevation that I know of.  The most flammable trees and shrubs up here are the various evergreens, especially soft wood pines, and manzanita which burns incredibly hot.
    “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
    -Aldous Huxley
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.









  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    We have planted pine forests also. Many have already gone up in smoke. Our native bush thrives on fire. Most of it will regenerate. It's over 2 million hectares in NSW that has gone up in flames now just such a vast forested area. Deforestation has already left only pockets of forest along the east coast. Couple with a long drawn out drought over the last 8 years and bam you have national disaster. Land and water mismanagement by corrupt governments. People are finally waking up. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 29,632
    We have planted pine forests also. Many have already gone up in smoke. Our native bush thrives on fire. Most of it will regenerate. It's over 2 million hectares in NSW that has gone up in flames now just such a vast forested area. Deforestation has already left only pockets of forest along the east coast. Couple with a long drawn out drought over the last 8 years and bam you have national disaster. Land and water mismanagement by corrupt governments. People are finally waking up. 

    Bummer!  I hope people wake up about deforesting so much of the planet soon.  I can't get myself to sate "it's too late" but we're pushing the envelope that way, for sure.
    “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
    -Aldous Huxley
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.









  • Thoughts_ArriveThoughts_Arrive Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 14,724
    And where is our PM?
    Adelaide 17/11/2009, Melbourne 20/11/2009, Sydney 22/11/2009, Melbourne (Big Day Out Festival) 24/01/2014
  • rhanishanerhanishane NSW AustraliaPosts: 414
    What PM????? If you mean the coal hugging piece of shit then im yet to see him?
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