Auto-Save Draft feature temporarily disabled. Please be sure you manually save your post by selecting "Save Draft" if you have that need.

Good News

167891012»

Comments

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 32,336
    brianlux said:
    Kat said:
    omg. I think she's outgrown the crib. Time for a real bed. Whew!



    Good catch, dad!  :smiley:
    Wow!

    That actually reminds me of kind of a similar situation about 20 years ago. I was out on a patio with friends at their house and a bunch of kids were running around. One toddler was trying to walk up a steep step, wobbled at the top, and then started to pitch over backward. Given the top-heaviness of toddlers, she was heading toward the concrete patio head first. I dove forward with my arms out and she landed perfectly in my outstretched arms, one hand under her back and Ike hand cradling her head, inches above the concrete. I have no idea how I did it - just pure luck and adrenaline. Her parents looked at me like I was god :lol:  

    Wow!  Great story, good catch, lucky kid!!!
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • KatKat There's a lot to be said for nowhere.Posts: 4,301
    Falling down,...not staying down
  • OnWis97OnWis97 St. Paul, MNPosts: 2,999
    I love elephants.  They come across as personable, playful, and friendly.  I wish we didn't ride them and kill them for their ivory.
    1995 Milwaukee
    1998 Alpine, Alpine
    2003 Albany, Boston, Boston, Boston
    2004 Boston, Boston
    2006 Hartford, St. Paul (Petty), St. Paul (Petty)
    2011 Alpine, Alpine
    2013 Wrigley
    2014 St. Paul
    2016 Fenway, Fenway, Wrigley, Wrigley
    2018 Missoula, Wrigley, Wrigley
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 32,336

    Wonderful!  Good news is always welcome these days!  :smile:
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • KatKat There's a lot to be said for nowhere.Posts: 4,301
    That was great...love seeing this thread bounce up. :)

    Falling down,...not staying down
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon I'm from Winnipeg, you idiot! (Chris Jericho)Posts: 23,047
    OnWis97 said:
    I love elephants.  They come across as personable, playful, and friendly.  I wish we didn't ride them and kill them for their ivory.
    when my kids were really young, we took them to the circus. against my better judgement, i took one of my kids on an elephant ride. i have always regretted it. i suppose if anything good came of it, it's retelling my kids the story and how wrong it was and how awful zoos are. 
    1993 - Gimli, MB (Sun/Mudfest)
    2003 - Fargo, ND
    2005 - Winnipeg, MB
    2011 - Minneapolis, MN (EV)
    2011 - Winnipeg, MB
    2014 - St. Paul, MN
    2020 - Ottawa, ON
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 32,336
    OnWis97 said:
    I love elephants.  They come across as personable, playful, and friendly.  I wish we didn't ride them and kill them for their ivory.
    when my kids were really young, we took them to the circus. against my better judgement, i took one of my kids on an elephant ride. i have always regretted it. i suppose if anything good came of it, it's retelling my kids the story and how wrong it was and how awful zoos are. 

    I've always been fascinated by elephants as well.  

    Several years ago I read about the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, so we signed up for a basic membership and have done their feed an elephant for a day donation a few times as well.  The news letter they send (hard copy or digital) is great.  You get to keep up with the latest on  the "girls".  It's really cool to see what Tara or Billie, and the others are up to.  Of course, once in a while, you know, they get old and and you hear about it and you cry.  But most of them live a good long life (Billie is 58!) and a much better life now because most were abused or were circus animals, etc.  They have it good now!




    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon I'm from Winnipeg, you idiot! (Chris Jericho)Posts: 23,047
    brianlux said:
    OnWis97 said:
    I love elephants.  They come across as personable, playful, and friendly.  I wish we didn't ride them and kill them for their ivory.
    when my kids were really young, we took them to the circus. against my better judgement, i took one of my kids on an elephant ride. i have always regretted it. i suppose if anything good came of it, it's retelling my kids the story and how wrong it was and how awful zoos are. 

    I've always been fascinated by elephants as well.  

    Several years ago I read about the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, so we signed up for a basic membership and have done their feed an elephant for a day donation a few times as well.  The news letter they send (hard copy or digital) is great.  You get to keep up with the latest on  the "girls".  It's really cool to see what Tara or Billie, and the others are up to.  Of course, once in a while, you know, they get old and and you hear about it and you cry.  But most of them live a good long life (Billie is 58!) and a much better life now because most were abused or were circus animals, etc.  They have it good now!




    thanks Brian! I'm so going to do that!
    1993 - Gimli, MB (Sun/Mudfest)
    2003 - Fargo, ND
    2005 - Winnipeg, MB
    2011 - Minneapolis, MN (EV)
    2011 - Winnipeg, MB
    2014 - St. Paul, MN
    2020 - Ottawa, ON
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 32,336
    brianlux said:
    OnWis97 said:
    I love elephants.  They come across as personable, playful, and friendly.  I wish we didn't ride them and kill them for their ivory.
    when my kids were really young, we took them to the circus. against my better judgement, i took one of my kids on an elephant ride. i have always regretted it. i suppose if anything good came of it, it's retelling my kids the story and how wrong it was and how awful zoos are. 

    I've always been fascinated by elephants as well.  

    Several years ago I read about the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, so we signed up for a basic membership and have done their feed an elephant for a day donation a few times as well.  The news letter they send (hard copy or digital) is great.  You get to keep up with the latest on  the "girls".  It's really cool to see what Tara or Billie, and the others are up to.  Of course, once in a while, you know, they get old and and you hear about it and you cry.  But most of them live a good long life (Billie is 58!) and a much better life now because most were abused or were circus animals, etc.  They have it good now!




    thanks Brian! I'm so going to do that!

    You'll love it!  :smile: 
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 22,126
    I admit I haven't (yet) listened to this in its entirety, but I dig the premise and the bits I've heard thus far.  Plus, Byrne's music - hell, he himself - makes me happy.  Could be worth a gander.  It's more than two years old, but I find it apt now more than ever.


  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 32,336

    Awesome!

    Here's another pieces of hopeful news.  There is so much hope just in this trailer alone!  I can't wait to see this film!



    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • RunIntoTheRainRunIntoTheRain TexasPosts: 833
    That looks great and it's on Netflix. I'll watch it this week. 
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 11,456
    A win-win-win story that seems best here, though it could have gone in the covid thread, or one of the environment threads. Kudos to our provincial government for funding an effort that cleaned up 127 tonnes of marine debris from very remote areas and provided employment to tour boat operators, their staff, and some First Nations communities, who would otherwise have had almost zero revenue in this summer of no tourism.

    https://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/tour-ship-operators-collect-127-tonnes-of-marine-debris-1.24222545

    Tour ship operators collect 127 tonnes of marine debris

    Tour ship companies anchored by the pandemic traded their usual tourists for mountains of trash, collecting 127 tonnes of marine waste along the central coast of British Columbia.

    The effort involved the captains and crew of the Small Ship Tour Operators Association of B.C., nine sailing ships, members of six First Nations, 18 Zodiac vessels, a helicopter and a massive barge.

    Among the items picked from remote shores were massive chunks of Styrofoam, kilometres of plastic rope, fishing floats, bottles, gas cans and bundles of “ghost” fishing nets that kill and injure fish, whales, birds and other marine animals.

    Over 42 days and 1,000 kilometres of coast line, the project collected enough to twice fill a hockey-rink sized barge with bags of debris piled like small mountains. It was offloaded at Port Hardy and trucked to 7-mile Landfill, a former mine near Port McNeill.

    The $3.5-million cleanup, financed by the provincial government’s Clean Coast Clean Waters Fund, far exceeded expectations.

    Kevin Smith, captain of Victoria-based Maple Leaf Adventures and team lead, said the cleanup saved the tourism companies, whose season was cancelled because of COVID-19, and provided employment for more than 100 crew and Indigenous community members. The final grab of trash also greatly surpassed initial estimates of 20 to 30 tonnes.

    “This was an industrial-sized cleanup, something that’s never been done before, and it was an incredible team effort,” Smith said.

    “It’s not like walking along Long Beach. This is the wild side of the coast pummeled by storms. It’s rugged, steep, treacherous. We’re moving enormous logs and finding drift netting that’s a half a mile long, and cutting it into sections to get it out.”

    The so-called ghost nets can entangle whales, fish and birds, which sink and die. The nets are known to refloat after the animals rot away, again posing a threat.

    Smith said about two thirds of the entire load of debris was Styrofoam, most of it from cheaply made Asian fishing floats that leak tiny pellets.

    “You walk up from the shore into the salal and see it in the shore, with trees growing through it,” he said. “Future anthropologists digging here might call it the Plasto-scene era.”

    At their peak, shore workers were collecting up to 10 tonnes per day, loading the debris into bags of about 320 kilograms each — the capacity of the helicopter — and placing them on beaches or rocky headlands.

    Daily morning meetings co-ordinated beach workers, ship and tender crews, helicopter lifts and barge locations. A drone was used to do further reconnaissance along the coast, looking for crucial debris sites.

    “We went dawn to dusk, 12-hour days, and there were no injuries,” Smith said. “We all felt we were taking part in something so positive. When a bag was lifted it was pure jubilation.”

    Smith said the tour ship operators and crew — many of them scientists — are currently preparing a report for the provincial government. By mid-November a complete breakdown the project is expected to outline in detail where the debris is coming from and why, what the province and Canada can do, and the advocacy needed to stem the debris from other countries.

    Smith noted much of the plastics picked up were old, some likely from a larger debris field in the Pacific related to the Japanese tsunami in 2011.

    They even found a message in a plastic bottle hurled off the shore of western Vancouver Island in 2003. “It was from someone having a bad day, nothing noteworthy,” Smith said.

    Despite the massive haul, the ship operators felt they only managed a small dent in the problem. With their tourism seasons possibly on hold again next season, Smith said operators would welcome the opportunity to do it again.

    “We all felt it was a beautiful thing — competing colleagues working toward a common goal,” he said.

    Doug Neasloss, stewardship director with the Kitasoo-Xai’Xais Nation, said the initiative provided a rare opportunity.

    “Marine debris is an ongoing challenge and a removal initiative of this scale — to clean up a large, remote coastline — is an undertaking that will provide significant environmental benefit to Kitasoo/Xai’Xais territory and beyond,” he said.

    The Small Ship Tour Operators Association of B.C. includes seven companies, most of which are based on Vancouver Island.

    The key players in the project included Russell Markell of Outer Shores Expeditions in Mill Bay; Ross Campbell of Mothership Adventures on Sointula Island; Comox-based Eric Boyum of Ocean Adventures Co.; and Randy Burts of Bluewater Adventures. Other key personnel included Scott Benton of the Wilderness Tourism Association, and Katherine MacRae of the Bear Viewing Association of B.C.

    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 32,336
    A win-win-win story that seems best here, though it could have gone in the covid thread, or one of the environment threads. Kudos to our provincial government for funding an effort that cleaned up 127 tonnes of marine debris from very remote areas and provided employment to tour boat operators, their staff, and some First Nations communities, who would otherwise have had almost zero revenue in this summer of no tourism.

    https://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/tour-ship-operators-collect-127-tonnes-of-marine-debris-1.24222545

    Tour ship operators collect 127 tonnes of marine debris

    Tour ship companies anchored by the pandemic traded their usual tourists for mountains of trash, collecting 127 tonnes of marine waste along the central coast of British Columbia.

    The effort involved the captains and crew of the Small Ship Tour Operators Association of B.C., nine sailing ships, members of six First Nations, 18 Zodiac vessels, a helicopter and a massive barge.

    Among the items picked from remote shores were massive chunks of Styrofoam, kilometres of plastic rope, fishing floats, bottles, gas cans and bundles of “ghost” fishing nets that kill and injure fish, whales, birds and other marine animals.

    Over 42 days and 1,000 kilometres of coast line, the project collected enough to twice fill a hockey-rink sized barge with bags of debris piled like small mountains. It was offloaded at Port Hardy and trucked to 7-mile Landfill, a former mine near Port McNeill.

    The $3.5-million cleanup, financed by the provincial government’s Clean Coast Clean Waters Fund, far exceeded expectations.

    Kevin Smith, captain of Victoria-based Maple Leaf Adventures and team lead, said the cleanup saved the tourism companies, whose season was cancelled because of COVID-19, and provided employment for more than 100 crew and Indigenous community members. The final grab of trash also greatly surpassed initial estimates of 20 to 30 tonnes.

    “This was an industrial-sized cleanup, something that’s never been done before, and it was an incredible team effort,” Smith said.

    “It’s not like walking along Long Beach. This is the wild side of the coast pummeled by storms. It’s rugged, steep, treacherous. We’re moving enormous logs and finding drift netting that’s a half a mile long, and cutting it into sections to get it out.”

    The so-called ghost nets can entangle whales, fish and birds, which sink and die. The nets are known to refloat after the animals rot away, again posing a threat.

    Smith said about two thirds of the entire load of debris was Styrofoam, most of it from cheaply made Asian fishing floats that leak tiny pellets.

    “You walk up from the shore into the salal and see it in the shore, with trees growing through it,” he said. “Future anthropologists digging here might call it the Plasto-scene era.”

    At their peak, shore workers were collecting up to 10 tonnes per day, loading the debris into bags of about 320 kilograms each — the capacity of the helicopter — and placing them on beaches or rocky headlands.

    Daily morning meetings co-ordinated beach workers, ship and tender crews, helicopter lifts and barge locations. A drone was used to do further reconnaissance along the coast, looking for crucial debris sites.

    “We went dawn to dusk, 12-hour days, and there were no injuries,” Smith said. “We all felt we were taking part in something so positive. When a bag was lifted it was pure jubilation.”

    Smith said the tour ship operators and crew — many of them scientists — are currently preparing a report for the provincial government. By mid-November a complete breakdown the project is expected to outline in detail where the debris is coming from and why, what the province and Canada can do, and the advocacy needed to stem the debris from other countries.

    Smith noted much of the plastics picked up were old, some likely from a larger debris field in the Pacific related to the Japanese tsunami in 2011.

    They even found a message in a plastic bottle hurled off the shore of western Vancouver Island in 2003. “It was from someone having a bad day, nothing noteworthy,” Smith said.

    Despite the massive haul, the ship operators felt they only managed a small dent in the problem. With their tourism seasons possibly on hold again next season, Smith said operators would welcome the opportunity to do it again.

    “We all felt it was a beautiful thing — competing colleagues working toward a common goal,” he said.

    Doug Neasloss, stewardship director with the Kitasoo-Xai’Xais Nation, said the initiative provided a rare opportunity.

    “Marine debris is an ongoing challenge and a removal initiative of this scale — to clean up a large, remote coastline — is an undertaking that will provide significant environmental benefit to Kitasoo/Xai’Xais territory and beyond,” he said.

    The Small Ship Tour Operators Association of B.C. includes seven companies, most of which are based on Vancouver Island.

    The key players in the project included Russell Markell of Outer Shores Expeditions in Mill Bay; Ross Campbell of Mothership Adventures on Sointula Island; Comox-based Eric Boyum of Ocean Adventures Co.; and Randy Burts of Bluewater Adventures. Other key personnel included Scott Benton of the Wilderness Tourism Association, and Katherine MacRae of the Bear Viewing Association of B.C.


    Fantastic! 
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • kce8kce8 Posts: 1,624
    Thank you for sharing. Loved reading this article.
    It's so wonderful to see what people can accomplish in difficult times, especially when they band together for it and not just do it for their own benefit.
Sign In or Register to comment.