Labels, yea or nay?

brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
We had a thread closed recently (thank you very much!) based on a label.  My own thinking more and more is that many labels today are inaccurate, misunderstood, outdated and definitely non-productive. If you were to ask me if I am liberal, conservative or moderate, I would say, "Non of the above".  I take issues one at a time and look for sensible, logical approaches to dealing with them.  I don't see people calling themselves either "liberal" or "conservative" making all the much difference in the world and the way conflicts are carried out between them has often gotten embarrassing.  The same problems we had when I became politically and environmentally concerned almost 50 years ago are the same damn ones we have today and some are worse.  I don't know about the rest of the world, but in America, the divisions are simultaneously widening and becoming absurd.  I'm probably seen as left leaning but I don't find that kind of terminology useful. 

So that's my take.  What about you:  Labels- useful, accurate, inaccurate, a waste of time? 
We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
***********
M.I.T.S.
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Comments

  • PJfanwillneverleave1PJfanwillneverleave1 Posts: 12,483
    edited May 30
    I think they are accurate.
    Example -  President Trump supporter or Non-President Trump supporter.
    Either we are alone in the universe, or we are not. Both ideas are overwhelming. AE
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 36,172
    Well vague-ass labels are basically useless. The more specific you get with the label, the more accurate it's going to be.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 5,846
    PJ_Soul said:
    Well vague-ass labels are basically useless. The more specific you get with the label, the more accurate it's going to be.
    My ass is not vague. In fact, it's fairly well defined. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 36,172
    PJ_Soul said:
    Well vague-ass labels are basically useless. The more specific you get with the label, the more accurate it's going to be.
    My ass is not vague. In fact, it's fairly well defined. 
    Lol, congrats on that ass! :lol:
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 8,805
    I'm actually in the pro-label camp.
    I'm a language guy and the way I see it, labels make conversation much easier.
    No, they don't always fit, but usually there is something pretty close, especially if you combine a few.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • jnimhaoileoinjnimhaoileoin Baile Átha CliathPosts: 2,445
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    I think they are accurate.
    Example -  President Trump supporter or Non-President Trump supporter.
    Is that a label or a description?
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    edited May 30
    PJ_Soul said:
    Well vague-ass labels are basically useless. The more specific you get with the label, the more accurate it's going to be.
    "vague-ass"   Like!  Will add that to my dictionary!  :wink:
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 36,172
    rgambs said:
    I'm actually in the pro-label camp.
    I'm a language guy and the way I see it, labels make conversation much easier.
    No, they don't always fit, but usually there is something pretty close, especially if you combine a few.
    That is a good point. Some folks seem to really have an issue with "generalizing"... But in real life we all generalize on a regular basis out of necessity. If we didn't generalize, we'd all be spending our entire lives trying to qualify everything we say. Nobody has the time and energy for that.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    rgambs said:
    I'm actually in the pro-label camp.
    I'm a language guy and the way I see it, labels make conversation much easier.
    No, they don't always fit, but usually there is something pretty close, especially if you combine a few.
    I too am big on language but that includes being accurate in its usage and that is that main problem I have with (at least here in the U.S.) the use of labels.  For example, most people see meas a "liberal" or even a bit "radical" but in all honesty, I see myself as being as much conservative as either of those.  But conservative with respect to what?  Well, the true meaning of the word, of course, as well as toward being pro conservation.   See what I mean?
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 36,172
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    That is kind of what I meant about specific labels vs vague ones. "Liberal" is vague. "Socialist" is not.
    I agree that labels are unavoidable at the end of the day, if you want to have conversations with people.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • dudemandudeman Posts: 1,303
    Some people have a desire, maybe even a need, to place others in a particular box. I assume that is so they know how to approach talking to them. I do it too but I see it as problematic. 
    If hope can grow from dirt like me, it can be done. - EV
  • Go BeaversGo Beavers Posts: 5,520
    Brian: The questioning subversive. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    Brian: The questioning subversive. 
    :smile:
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.

    I fit into a neat and tidy little description that is precise and understood thoroughly by some around here. You need labels to carry the concept in a conversation.
    Either we are alone in the universe, or we are not. Both ideas are overwhelming. AE
  • jnimhaoileoinjnimhaoileoin Baile Átha CliathPosts: 2,445
    edited May 30
    brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.
    I would have thought it was pretty clear from my answer that I don't think labels are vague or innaccurate. Maybe they are in America but over here things are pretty clear. Firstly, we don't even use the term liberal so have no issues with that. We have left-wing, right-wing and centrist. We have socialists and conservatives. I actually don't understand your argument. Maybe it's a cultural thing. We're big talkers and debaters here in Ireland and people are on average quite knowledgeable about politics and the historical identity of all our parties. We're also pretty good with language so we just don't have a problem using or understanding labels. They make things easier as they allow us to identify with a particular platform and align ourselves to the corresponding politicians or parties. This is how politics has worked for a long time and it works pretty well in Europe. America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.

    I fit into a neat and tidy little description that is precise and understood thoroughly by some around here. You need labels to carry the concept in a conversation.
    I'm not sure I understand how or why I need them, PJF.  Personally, I would prefer an accurate description.   For example:  instead of "liberal", "a democratic socialist with a biocentic viewpoint who questions the wisdom of open borders".  Wordier and not so "easy"?  Yes.  More precise?  Vastly.
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.
    I would have thought it was pretty clear from my answer that I don't think labels are vague or innaccurate. Maybe they are in America but over here things are pretty clear. Firstly, we don't even use the term liberal so have no issues with that. We have left-wing, right-wing and centrist. We have socialists and conservatives. I actually don't understand your argument. Maybe it's a cultural thing. We're big talkers and debaters here in Ireland and people are on average quite knowledgeable about politics and the historical identity of all our parties. We're also pretty good with language so we just don't have a problem using or understanding labels. They make things easier as they allow us to identify with a particular platform and align ourselves to the corresponding politicians or parties. This is how politics has worked for a long time and it works pretty well in Europe. America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for
    It sounds as though people in Ireland  fit more neatly into a more specifically defined outlook than here in the U.S.  That may be helpful, I don't know, though it sounds a bit unlikely.  Are people really that specifically aligned there... or here for that matter?  I don't think so- at least I hope not.  That would indicate to me a lack of critical thinking. Why accept a narrowly defined view of life, politics, culture, etc?  That seems stifling to me.

    "America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for."  This, in my opinion, is absolutely true.
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • my2handsmy2hands Posts: 12,635
    You gotta read the labels.... Tommy ain't my motherfu...




  • You said:
    I'm not sure I understand how or why I
    need them, PJF.  Personally, I would prefer an accurate description.   For example:  instead of "liberal", "a democratic socialist with a biocentic viewpoint who questions the wisdom of open borders".  Wordier and not so "easy"?  Yes.  More precise?  Vastly

    Wordier yes and not always explaining anything, just talk, yes.  A simple label of "liberal" will do to those who understand.


    Either we are alone in the universe, or we are not. Both ideas are overwhelming. AE
  • jnimhaoileoinjnimhaoileoin Baile Átha CliathPosts: 2,445
    edited May 31
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.
    I would have thought it was pretty clear from my answer that I don't think labels are vague or innaccurate. Maybe they are in America but over here things are pretty clear. Firstly, we don't even use the term liberal so have no issues with that. We have left-wing, right-wing and centrist. We have socialists and conservatives. I actually don't understand your argument. Maybe it's a cultural thing. We're big talkers and debaters here in Ireland and people are on average quite knowledgeable about politics and the historical identity of all our parties. We're also pretty good with language so we just don't have a problem using or understanding labels. They make things easier as they allow us to identify with a particular platform and align ourselves to the corresponding politicians or parties. This is how politics has worked for a long time and it works pretty well in Europe. America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for
    It sounds as though people in Ireland  fit more neatly into a more specifically defined outlook than here in the U.S.  That may be helpful, I don't know, though it sounds a bit unlikely.  Are people really that specifically aligned there... or here for that matter?  I don't think so- at least I hope not.  That would indicate to me a lack of critical thinking. Why accept a narrowly defined view of life, politics, culture, etc?  That seems stifling to me.

    "America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for."  This, in my opinion, is absolutely true.
    I'm afraid you can't really compare Ireland and America, our cultures and politics are just too different for me to explain satisfactorily how things work over here. Also I can only speak for myself and I have stronger views and a greater interest in politics than the average person I suppose. To give you a small inkling into Irish politics, since we gained our independence in 1921, political loyalties have largely been divided between the pro and anti-treaty parties, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael. Support for these parties has passed through generations and it still seems likely that one or other of them will always be the majority party in whatever government happens to be in power. Fianna Fáil is Centrist and Fine Gael centre-right. However, we also have Labour and Sinn Féin on the left, as well as two or three other socialist parties. In recent years there has been growing support for independents, which you might perceive to be people searching for someone who more precisely represents their own world view. In reality though, it's mostly about giving the big parties a kick up the arse and worshipping at the altar of parish pump politics. Perhaps the biggest difference between us and America though, is that we generally believe that pretty much all of our politicians want to do their best for the country and there really isn't the same distance between them as there is between American politicians. This is a very very small country, everything is local and we just don't have the same kind of divisions
    Post edited by jnimhaoileoin on
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    my2hands said:
    You gotta read the labels.... Tommy ain't my motherfu...




    LOL.

    Yeah, I always read labels on the CAN  (sorry, just got this crazy record!)

    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.
    I would have thought it was pretty clear from my answer that I don't think labels are vague or innaccurate. Maybe they are in America but over here things are pretty clear. Firstly, we don't even use the term liberal so have no issues with that. We have left-wing, right-wing and centrist. We have socialists and conservatives. I actually don't understand your argument. Maybe it's a cultural thing. We're big talkers and debaters here in Ireland and people are on average quite knowledgeable about politics and the historical identity of all our parties. We're also pretty good with language so we just don't have a problem using or understanding labels. They make things easier as they allow us to identify with a particular platform and align ourselves to the corresponding politicians or parties. This is how politics has worked for a long time and it works pretty well in Europe. America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for
    It sounds as though people in Ireland  fit more neatly into a more specifically defined outlook than here in the U.S.  That may be helpful, I don't know, though it sounds a bit unlikely.  Are people really that specifically aligned there... or here for that matter?  I don't think so- at least I hope not.  That would indicate to me a lack of critical thinking. Why accept a narrowly defined view of life, politics, culture, etc?  That seems stifling to me.

    "America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for."  This, in my opinion, is absolutely true.
    I'm afraid you can't really compare Ireland and America, our cultures and politics are just too different for me to explain satisfactorily how things work over here. Also I can only speak for myself and I have stronger views and a greater interest in politics than the average person I suppose. To give you a small inkling into Irish politics, since we gained our independence in 1921, political loyalties have largely been divided between the pro and anti-treaty parties, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael. Support for these parties has passed through generations and it still seems likely that one or other of them will always be the majority party in whatever government happens to be in power. Fianna Fáil is Centrist and Fine Gael centre-right. However, we also have Labour and Sinn Féin on the left, as well as two or three other socialist parties. In recent years there has been growing support for independents, which you might perceive to be people searching for someone who more precisely represents their own world view. In reality though, it's mostly about giving the big parties a kick up the arse and worshipping at the altar of parish pump politics. Perhaps the biggest difference between us and America though, is that we generally believe that pretty much all of our politicians want to do their best for the country and there really isn't the same distance between them as there is between American politicians. This is a very very small country, everything is local and we just don't have the same kind of divisions
    Compare the two?  Oh, heck no!

    One of our main differences: the religious wars.  Americans just pretty much hate every religion that isn't Jesus based.  You guys have that crazy endless Catholic vs Protestant thing.
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • jnimhaoileoinjnimhaoileoin Baile Átha CliathPosts: 2,445
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.
    I would have thought it was pretty clear from my answer that I don't think labels are vague or innaccurate. Maybe they are in America but over here things are pretty clear. Firstly, we don't even use the term liberal so have no issues with that. We have left-wing, right-wing and centrist. We have socialists and conservatives. I actually don't understand your argument. Maybe it's a cultural thing. We're big talkers and debaters here in Ireland and people are on average quite knowledgeable about politics and the historical identity of all our parties. We're also pretty good with language so we just don't have a problem using or understanding labels. They make things easier as they allow us to identify with a particular platform and align ourselves to the corresponding politicians or parties. This is how politics has worked for a long time and it works pretty well in Europe. America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for
    It sounds as though people in Ireland  fit more neatly into a more specifically defined outlook than here in the U.S.  That may be helpful, I don't know, though it sounds a bit unlikely.  Are people really that specifically aligned there... or here for that matter?  I don't think so- at least I hope not.  That would indicate to me a lack of critical thinking. Why accept a narrowly defined view of life, politics, culture, etc?  That seems stifling to me.

    "America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for."  This, in my opinion, is absolutely true.
    I'm afraid you can't really compare Ireland and America, our cultures and politics are just too different for me to explain satisfactorily how things work over here. Also I can only speak for myself and I have stronger views and a greater interest in politics than the average person I suppose. To give you a small inkling into Irish politics, since we gained our independence in 1921, political loyalties have largely been divided between the pro and anti-treaty parties, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael. Support for these parties has passed through generations and it still seems likely that one or other of them will always be the majority party in whatever government happens to be in power. Fianna Fáil is Centrist and Fine Gael centre-right. However, we also have Labour and Sinn Féin on the left, as well as two or three other socialist parties. In recent years there has been growing support for independents, which you might perceive to be people searching for someone who more precisely represents their own world view. In reality though, it's mostly about giving the big parties a kick up the arse and worshipping at the altar of parish pump politics. Perhaps the biggest difference between us and America though, is that we generally believe that pretty much all of our politicians want to do their best for the country and there really isn't the same distance between them as there is between American politicians. This is a very very small country, everything is local and we just don't have the same kind of divisions
    Compare the two?  Oh, heck no!

    One of our main differences: the religious wars.  Americans just pretty much hate every religion that isn't Jesus based.  You guys have that crazy endless Catholic vs Protestant thing.
    Well of course our Catholic v Protestant thing has absolutely nothing to do with religion and everything to do with 800 years of colonial rule. It just happens that the colonists were Protestant and their descendants Protestant Unionists. It's more the Unionist bit we have a problem with!
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 20,234
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.
    I would have thought it was pretty clear from my answer that I don't think labels are vague or innaccurate. Maybe they are in America but over here things are pretty clear. Firstly, we don't even use the term liberal so have no issues with that. We have left-wing, right-wing and centrist. We have socialists and conservatives. I actually don't understand your argument. Maybe it's a cultural thing. We're big talkers and debaters here in Ireland and people are on average quite knowledgeable about politics and the historical identity of all our parties. We're also pretty good with language so we just don't have a problem using or understanding labels. They make things easier as they allow us to identify with a particular platform and align ourselves to the corresponding politicians or parties. This is how politics has worked for a long time and it works pretty well in Europe. America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for
    It sounds as though people in Ireland  fit more neatly into a more specifically defined outlook than here in the U.S.  That may be helpful, I don't know, though it sounds a bit unlikely.  Are people really that specifically aligned there... or here for that matter?  I don't think so- at least I hope not.  That would indicate to me a lack of critical thinking. Why accept a narrowly defined view of life, politics, culture, etc?  That seems stifling to me.

    "America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for."  This, in my opinion, is absolutely true.
    I'm afraid you can't really compare Ireland and America, our cultures and politics are just too different for me to explain satisfactorily how things work over here. Also I can only speak for myself and I have stronger views and a greater interest in politics than the average person I suppose. To give you a small inkling into Irish politics, since we gained our independence in 1921, political loyalties have largely been divided between the pro and anti-treaty parties, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael. Support for these parties has passed through generations and it still seems likely that one or other of them will always be the majority party in whatever government happens to be in power. Fianna Fáil is Centrist and Fine Gael centre-right. However, we also have Labour and Sinn Féin on the left, as well as two or three other socialist parties. In recent years there has been growing support for independents, which you might perceive to be people searching for someone who more precisely represents their own world view. In reality though, it's mostly about giving the big parties a kick up the arse and worshipping at the altar of parish pump politics. Perhaps the biggest difference between us and America though, is that we generally believe that pretty much all of our politicians want to do their best for the country and there really isn't the same distance between them as there is between American politicians. This is a very very small country, everything is local and we just don't have the same kind of divisions
    Compare the two?  Oh, heck no!

    One of our main differences: the religious wars.  Americans just pretty much hate every religion that isn't Jesus based.  You guys have that crazy endless Catholic vs Protestant thing.
    Well of course our Catholic v Protestant thing has absolutely nothing to do with religion and everything to do with 800 years of colonial rule. It just happens that the colonists were Protestant and their descendants Protestant Unionists. It's more the Unionist bit we have a problem with!
    Well, at least some good music came out of all that (thinking back to seeing U2 during their "War" tour.  I've often wondered if Bono's climbing stage scaffolding was a role model for Ed?!)
    We're living on the edge of something big. It's a fantastic time in history to be alive.
    AMT, 1.25.15, 00:36 hrs.
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.
  • Go BeaversGo Beavers Posts: 5,520
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Labels are pretty damn essential when having any discussion about politics. I don't know how it works in your country but parties are identified by labels and it just makes everything a lot easier. In Denmark, the statsminister is from the Venstre party, which literally means Left (though in English they're called the Liberal Party). Nearly every country in Europe has a Socialist party. It's just how things work. 
    If we could agree that labels are vague or inaccurate (and I don't know you you do agree with that), then I would ask, what makes labels essential?  Should not something essential and important be precise and thoroughly understood as well?  Do people- or anybody for that matter- fir into a neat and tidy little description? 

    And what is the "everything" you mention that labels make easy and why  is it this everything needs to be easy? 

    I'm not trying to be belligerent with you, honestly, but I don't understand your argument.
    I would have thought it was pretty clear from my answer that I don't think labels are vague or innaccurate. Maybe they are in America but over here things are pretty clear. Firstly, we don't even use the term liberal so have no issues with that. We have left-wing, right-wing and centrist. We have socialists and conservatives. I actually don't understand your argument. Maybe it's a cultural thing. We're big talkers and debaters here in Ireland and people are on average quite knowledgeable about politics and the historical identity of all our parties. We're also pretty good with language so we just don't have a problem using or understanding labels. They make things easier as they allow us to identify with a particular platform and align ourselves to the corresponding politicians or parties. This is how politics has worked for a long time and it works pretty well in Europe. America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for
    It sounds as though people in Ireland  fit more neatly into a more specifically defined outlook than here in the U.S.  That may be helpful, I don't know, though it sounds a bit unlikely.  Are people really that specifically aligned there... or here for that matter?  I don't think so- at least I hope not.  That would indicate to me a lack of critical thinking. Why accept a narrowly defined view of life, politics, culture, etc?  That seems stifling to me.

    "America is weird as socialism is like a dirty word so both parties seem to be conservative and it's often bloody hard to know what either of them stand for."  This, in my opinion, is absolutely true.
    I'm afraid you can't really compare Ireland and America, our cultures and politics are just too different for me to explain satisfactorily how things work over here. Also I can only speak for myself and I have stronger views and a greater interest in politics than the average person I suppose. To give you a small inkling into Irish politics, since we gained our independence in 1921, political loyalties have largely been divided between the pro and anti-treaty parties, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael. Support for these parties has passed through generations and it still seems likely that one or other of them will always be the majority party in whatever government happens to be in power. Fianna Fáil is Centrist and Fine Gael centre-right. However, we also have Labour and Sinn Féin on the left, as well as two or three other socialist parties. In recent years there has been growing support for independents, which you might perceive to be people searching for someone who more precisely represents their own world view. In reality though, it's mostly about giving the big parties a kick up the arse and worshipping at the altar of parish pump politics. Perhaps the biggest difference between us and America though, is that we generally believe that pretty much all of our politicians want to do their best for the country and there really isn't the same distance between them as there is between American politicians. This is a very very small country, everything is local and we just don't have the same kind of divisions
    Compare the two?  Oh, heck no!

    One of our main differences: the religious wars.  Americans just pretty much hate every religion that isn't Jesus based.  You guys have that crazy endless Catholic vs Protestant thing.
    Well of course our Catholic v Protestant thing has absolutely nothing to do with religion and everything to do with 800 years of colonial rule. It just happens that the colonists were Protestant and their descendants Protestant Unionists. It's more the Unionist bit we have a problem with!
    So you're saying the terrorism wasn't motivated by an actual religion, but something else? Hmmmm...
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 8,805
    brianlux said:
    rgambs said:
    I'm actually in the pro-label camp.
    I'm a language guy and the way I see it, labels make conversation much easier.
    No, they don't always fit, but usually there is something pretty close, especially if you combine a few.
    I too am big on language but that includes being accurate in its usage and that is that main problem I have with (at least here in the U.S.) the use of labels.  For example, most people see meas a "liberal" or even a bit "radical" but in all honesty, I see myself as being as much conservative as either of those.  But conservative with respect to what?  Well, the true meaning of the word, of course, as well as toward being pro conservation.   See what I mean?
    Haha I should have known you would take it there! You are right, we are the true conservatives, you have said it before and I agree wholeheartedly.
    In that way, the labels that adhere to us are entirely faulty, and I think that is probably the case with most labels.  They are not accurate or precise, and they have glaring holes and/or redundancies and contradictions.
    I'm still pro lol
    They just make things easier, and any decent discussion quickly moves beyond them anyways.

    Besides, what fun would it be if you never got to make that point about what is truly conservative again?  No fun, lol

    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 8,805
    dudeman said:
    Some people have a desire, maybe even a need, to place others in a particular box. I assume that is so they know how to approach talking to them. I do it too but I see it as problematic. 
    Though far fewer, there are also the people who have a need to refuse any sort of label or description at all on the other side of the spectrum.

    The part of me that takes long slow sips of Haterade day and night gets annoyed at those people.
    That goth girl/boy that raves about being too unique and original to be described...who hangs out with people that act, look, and think just like her/him...
    :anguished:
    Libertarians
    :anguished:
    Martians
    :confused:
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
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