The AMT Marijuana Thread

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  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Legaliization is a little fucked up in Ontario.  Let hear from those Canadians and Americans from other province/states at how legalization is working/or going to be working once legal in your region?  
    No complaints from me in BC so far. But we've yet to see how current dispensaries will be handled in the licensing process, and how that will tie in to medical sales - it sounds like medical dispensaries will be kept separate from recreational sales, but it's not too clear yet. Until I find that out, along with how the cops on the street will actually handle things once legalization happens, I don't have all that much to say or to complain about. I'm okay with all the other decisions that have been made. I think that they are all quite reasonable. Fine age limit, fine possession limit, fine rules about growing at home, and the producers are already well ahead of the game, with little to no controversy. The public use rules make sense considering the rules about smoking cigarettes (basically the exact same restrictions, plus a couple caveats relating to where children gather). I expected it to go well here (from my own perspective), and I think that is so far. I do not think that when it comes to Ontario of course. Not allowing the private sector to participate is stunningly stupid and shortsighted, and altogether illogical. It's the one thing I figure maybe Doug Ford can really do some good for - I know he thinks that's an idiotic decision as well.
    I also think BC has been at the for front of legalization in the private sector.  That's great that you are happy.  In the end I'm fine either way here in Ontario.  I like my medicinal supplier ... so that's what maters the most.  But if Ford puts Cannabis in the liquor stores there should be no problems ... the staff are great, the stores are plenty big enough to accommodate cannabis.
    I actually think putting it into the liquor stores is a HORRIBLE idea. This is brand new industry that can really provide huge benefits to people in terms of jobs and everything... but not if Ontario just hands it to liquor stores and pretty much gets existing employees to deal with it - I doubt that would lead to very much new job creation at all. It's also a terrible idea because liquor store imployees don't know squat about weed. There should be dedicated pot shops where the employees actually know what they're talking about and have a specific interest and knowledge in that specific product.
    Doing all private sales through liquor stores is just the lazy man's solution.
    Well personally I would have preferred private sector.  But Ontario is little behind.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,465
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Legaliization is a little fucked up in Ontario.  Let hear from those Canadians and Americans from other province/states at how legalization is working/or going to be working once legal in your region?  
    No complaints from me in BC so far. But we've yet to see how current dispensaries will be handled in the licensing process, and how that will tie in to medical sales - it sounds like medical dispensaries will be kept separate from recreational sales, but it's not too clear yet. Until I find that out, along with how the cops on the street will actually handle things once legalization happens, I don't have all that much to say or to complain about. I'm okay with all the other decisions that have been made. I think that they are all quite reasonable. Fine age limit, fine possession limit, fine rules about growing at home, and the producers are already well ahead of the game, with little to no controversy. The public use rules make sense considering the rules about smoking cigarettes (basically the exact same restrictions, plus a couple caveats relating to where children gather). I expected it to go well here (from my own perspective), and I think that is so far. I do not think that when it comes to Ontario of course. Not allowing the private sector to participate is stunningly stupid and shortsighted, and altogether illogical. It's the one thing I figure maybe Doug Ford can really do some good for - I know he thinks that's an idiotic decision as well.
    I also think BC has been at the for front of legalization in the private sector.  That's great that you are happy.  In the end I'm fine either way here in Ontario.  I like my medicinal supplier ... so that's what maters the most.  But if Ford puts Cannabis in the liquor stores there should be no problems ... the staff are great, the stores are plenty big enough to accommodate cannabis.
    I actually think putting it into the liquor stores is a HORRIBLE idea. This is brand new industry that can really provide huge benefits to people in terms of jobs and everything... but not if Ontario just hands it to liquor stores and pretty much gets existing employees to deal with it - I doubt that would lead to very much new job creation at all. It's also a terrible idea because liquor store imployees don't know squat about weed. There should be dedicated pot shops where the employees actually know what they're talking about and have a specific interest and knowledge in that specific product.
    Doing all private sales through liquor stores is just the lazy man's solution.
    Well, the liquor stores could hire weed specialists, the way they hire wine specialists or spirit specialists or beer specialists. I’m not sure they necessarily would, but if would be an option. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    edited June 28
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Legaliization is a little fucked up in Ontario.  Let hear from those Canadians and Americans from other province/states at how legalization is working/or going to be working once legal in your region?  
    No complaints from me in BC so far. But we've yet to see how current dispensaries will be handled in the licensing process, and how that will tie in to medical sales - it sounds like medical dispensaries will be kept separate from recreational sales, but it's not too clear yet. Until I find that out, along with how the cops on the street will actually handle things once legalization happens, I don't have all that much to say or to complain about. I'm okay with all the other decisions that have been made. I think that they are all quite reasonable. Fine age limit, fine possession limit, fine rules about growing at home, and the producers are already well ahead of the game, with little to no controversy. The public use rules make sense considering the rules about smoking cigarettes (basically the exact same restrictions, plus a couple caveats relating to where children gather). I expected it to go well here (from my own perspective), and I think that is so far. I do not think that when it comes to Ontario of course. Not allowing the private sector to participate is stunningly stupid and shortsighted, and altogether illogical. It's the one thing I figure maybe Doug Ford can really do some good for - I know he thinks that's an idiotic decision as well.
    I also think BC has been at the for front of legalization in the private sector.  That's great that you are happy.  In the end I'm fine either way here in Ontario.  I like my medicinal supplier ... so that's what maters the most.  But if Ford puts Cannabis in the liquor stores there should be no problems ... the staff are great, the stores are plenty big enough to accommodate cannabis.
    I actually think putting it into the liquor stores is a HORRIBLE idea. This is brand new industry that can really provide huge benefits to people in terms of jobs and everything... but not if Ontario just hands it to liquor stores and pretty much gets existing employees to deal with it - I doubt that would lead to very much new job creation at all. It's also a terrible idea because liquor store imployees don't know squat about weed. There should be dedicated pot shops where the employees actually know what they're talking about and have a specific interest and knowledge in that specific product.
    Doing all private sales through liquor stores is just the lazy man's solution.
    Well, the liquor stores could hire weed specialists, the way they hire wine specialists or spirit specialists or beer specialists. I’m not sure they necessarily would, but if would be an option. 
    Yeah, but even if they did, that would amount to what? One or two employees per relevant store? When in fact this industry can easily facilitate an entirely new retail industry that can employ to many more, and create so many more workers/entrepreneurs/business owners. It just seems like dedicated pot shops makes so much more sense socially and economically.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,465
    edited June 28
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Legaliization is a little fucked up in Ontario.  Let hear from those Canadians and Americans from other province/states at how legalization is working/or going to be working once legal in your region?  
    No complaints from me in BC so far. But we've yet to see how current dispensaries will be handled in the licensing process, and how that will tie in to medical sales - it sounds like medical dispensaries will be kept separate from recreational sales, but it's not too clear yet. Until I find that out, along with how the cops on the street will actually handle things once legalization happens, I don't have all that much to say or to complain about. I'm okay with all the other decisions that have been made. I think that they are all quite reasonable. Fine age limit, fine possession limit, fine rules about growing at home, and the producers are already well ahead of the game, with little to no controversy. The public use rules make sense considering the rules about smoking cigarettes (basically the exact same restrictions, plus a couple caveats relating to where children gather). I expected it to go well here (from my own perspective), and I think that is so far. I do not think that when it comes to Ontario of course. Not allowing the private sector to participate is stunningly stupid and shortsighted, and altogether illogical. It's the one thing I figure maybe Doug Ford can really do some good for - I know he thinks that's an idiotic decision as well.
    I also think BC has been at the for front of legalization in the private sector.  That's great that you are happy.  In the end I'm fine either way here in Ontario.  I like my medicinal supplier ... so that's what maters the most.  But if Ford puts Cannabis in the liquor stores there should be no problems ... the staff are great, the stores are plenty big enough to accommodate cannabis.
    I actually think putting it into the liquor stores is a HORRIBLE idea. This is brand new industry that can really provide huge benefits to people in terms of jobs and everything... but not if Ontario just hands it to liquor stores and pretty much gets existing employees to deal with it - I doubt that would lead to very much new job creation at all. It's also a terrible idea because liquor store imployees don't know squat about weed. There should be dedicated pot shops where the employees actually know what they're talking about and have a specific interest and knowledge in that specific product.
    Doing all private sales through liquor stores is just the lazy man's solution.
    Well, the liquor stores could hire weed specialists, the way they hire wine specialists or spirit specialists or beer specialists. I’m not sure they necessarily would, but if would be an option. 
    Yeah, but even if they did, that would amount to what? One or two employees per relevant store? When in fact this industry can easily facilitate an entirely new retail industry that can employ to many more, and create so many more workers/entrepreneurs/business owners. It just seems like dedicated pot shops makes so much more sense socially and economically.
    Sure, I agree, but if that doesn’t happen they can still hire experienced staff. 
     
    Edit for spelling - sorry, jet lagged. 
    Post edited by oftenreading on
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Legaliization is a little fucked up in Ontario.  Let hear from those Canadians and Americans from other province/states at how legalization is working/or going to be working once legal in your region?  
    No complaints from me in BC so far. But we've yet to see how current dispensaries will be handled in the licensing process, and how that will tie in to medical sales - it sounds like medical dispensaries will be kept separate from recreational sales, but it's not too clear yet. Until I find that out, along with how the cops on the street will actually handle things once legalization happens, I don't have all that much to say or to complain about. I'm okay with all the other decisions that have been made. I think that they are all quite reasonable. Fine age limit, fine possession limit, fine rules about growing at home, and the producers are already well ahead of the game, with little to no controversy. The public use rules make sense considering the rules about smoking cigarettes (basically the exact same restrictions, plus a couple caveats relating to where children gather). I expected it to go well here (from my own perspective), and I think that is so far. I do not think that when it comes to Ontario of course. Not allowing the private sector to participate is stunningly stupid and shortsighted, and altogether illogical. It's the one thing I figure maybe Doug Ford can really do some good for - I know he thinks that's an idiotic decision as well.
    I also think BC has been at the for front of legalization in the private sector.  That's great that you are happy.  In the end I'm fine either way here in Ontario.  I like my medicinal supplier ... so that's what maters the most.  But if Ford puts Cannabis in the liquor stores there should be no problems ... the staff are great, the stores are plenty big enough to accommodate cannabis.
    I actually think putting it into the liquor stores is a HORRIBLE idea. This is brand new industry that can really provide huge benefits to people in terms of jobs and everything... but not if Ontario just hands it to liquor stores and pretty much gets existing employees to deal with it - I doubt that would lead to very much new job creation at all. It's also a terrible idea because liquor store imployees don't know squat about weed. There should be dedicated pot shops where the employees actually know what they're talking about and have a specific interest and knowledge in that specific product.
    Doing all private sales through liquor stores is just the lazy man's solution.
    Well, the liquor stores could hire weed specialists, the way they hire wine specialists or spirit specialists or beer specialists. I’m not sure they necessarily would, but if would be an option. 
    Yeah, but even if they did, that would amount to what? One or two employees per relevant store? When in fact this industry can easily facilitate an entirely new retail industry that can employ to many more, and create so many more workers/entrepreneurs/business owners. It just seems like dedicated pot shops makes so much more sense socially and economically.
    Sure, I agree, but I’d that doesn’t happen they can still hire experienced staff. 
     
    Yes, that's true. But will they? I bet many wouldn't, and use that salary as profit.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
    Cannabis should be left to the private  sector.  At this point in Ontario I think the LCBO can accommodate.  I see no need to spend money creating another bureaucracy.  
  • vaggar99vaggar99 San Diego USAPosts: 2,789
    my2hands said:
    vaggar99 said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    vaggar99 said:
    i know of at least 1 dispensary that was offering free thc capsules for program approved opioid addicts, to try to get them off that shi t
    600mg per pill
    i bought one just for kicks and had to stay on the couch for awhile....
    gotta be careful with those edibles.  they can be quite scary in high enough doses
    You do... although it only feels like you're dying when you take too much, lol. That is why so many people who eat too many edibles tend to feel like they need to go to the ER. But they don't. It always passes without doing any actual harm. It's not the same as an OD or alcohol poisoning at all. But yeah, it can be scary at the time, especially since you're too high to have a good handle on the idea that you just have to wait it out.
    well, I guess this post confirms I will never try edibles fucking ever. LOL
    if you've ever tried LSD, a strong edible is similar.
    It is nowhere near similar my friend. Not even close
    i should have used a better choice of words.  perhaps like "the paranoia from a strong edible can be similar to a bad LSD or mushroom trip"
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    Cannabis should be left to the private  sector.  At this point in Ontario I think the LCBO can accommodate.  I see no need to spend money creating another bureaucracy.  
    Nothing wrong with new store fronts IMO, even if they are government run. Either way that is probably better for the economy than just throwing up a weed display or counter in existing stores. I don't think it sounds like a whole new bureaucracy will need to be built, really. It more sounds like an add-on to one that already exists.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
    PJ_Soul said:
    Cannabis should be left to the private  sector.  At this point in Ontario I think the LCBO can accommodate.  I see no need to spend money creating another bureaucracy.  
    Nothing wrong with new store fronts IMO, even if they are government run. Either way that is probably better for the economy than just throwing up a weed display or counter in existing stores. I don't think it sounds like a whole new bureaucracy will need to be built, really. It more sounds like an add-on to one that already exists.
    Ontario does not need to add to it's already bloated public sector.   The LCBO and private sector can accommodate .... people wonder why taxes are so high ... this is why?
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    PJ_Soul said:
    Cannabis should be left to the private  sector.  At this point in Ontario I think the LCBO can accommodate.  I see no need to spend money creating another bureaucracy.  
    Nothing wrong with new store fronts IMO, even if they are government run. Either way that is probably better for the economy than just throwing up a weed display or counter in existing stores. I don't think it sounds like a whole new bureaucracy will need to be built, really. It more sounds like an add-on to one that already exists.
    Ontario does not need to add to it's already bloated public sector.   The LCBO and private sector can accommodate .... people wonder why taxes are so high ... this is why?
    Well you know I'm not in favour of no private sector. I'm just talking about what's best for a really bad idea.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Cannabis should be left to the private  sector.  At this point in Ontario I think the LCBO can accommodate.  I see no need to spend money creating another bureaucracy.  
    Nothing wrong with new store fronts IMO, even if they are government run. Either way that is probably better for the economy than just throwing up a weed display or counter in existing stores. I don't think it sounds like a whole new bureaucracy will need to be built, really. It more sounds like an add-on to one that already exists.
    Ontario does not need to add to it's already bloated public sector.   The LCBO and private sector can accommodate .... people wonder why taxes are so high ... this is why?
    Well you know I'm not in favour of no private sector. I'm just talking about what's best for a really bad idea.
    I am not sure if you've been in the LCBO before?  They are nice stores with well trained staff.  I just see no need to invest in stand alone Cannabis stores.  If we want stand alone Cannabis stores then let the private sector do it ... Does BC (Vancouver) have private pot shops that sell to anyone?  We had a Cannabis festival a few months back and I was able to buy some edibles.  Much prefer smoking myself, even prefer smoking over vaping.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    edited June 29
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    Cannabis should be left to the private  sector.  At this point in Ontario I think the LCBO can accommodate.  I see no need to spend money creating another bureaucracy.  
    Nothing wrong with new store fronts IMO, even if they are government run. Either way that is probably better for the economy than just throwing up a weed display or counter in existing stores. I don't think it sounds like a whole new bureaucracy will need to be built, really. It more sounds like an add-on to one that already exists.
    Ontario does not need to add to it's already bloated public sector.   The LCBO and private sector can accommodate .... people wonder why taxes are so high ... this is why?
    Well you know I'm not in favour of no private sector. I'm just talking about what's best for a really bad idea.
    I am not sure if you've been in the LCBO before?  They are nice stores with well trained staff.  I just see no need to invest in stand alone Cannabis stores.  If we want stand alone Cannabis stores then let the private sector do it ... Does BC (Vancouver) have private pot shops that sell to anyone?  We had a Cannabis festival a few months back and I was able to buy some edibles.  Much prefer smoking myself, even prefer smoking over vaping.
    No I've not been to an LCBO store, but I assume they are much like BC Liquor Stores - yes, really nice stores (particularly the Signature locations) with really well trained staff. That has nothing to do with it IMO, but I obviously have no problem with the government investing in creating a whole new job market.
    Vancouver has at least 100 private pot shops/"dispensaries" (some are not-for-profit too). There are more pot shops than there are Starbucks, haha. Though no, most of them don't technically sell to anyone - some require a membership, which are supposedly given for those with scripts, but that's not what's actually happening. But my regular shop just cancelled it's requirement for membership, and many other places are doing the same as legalization gets closer.
    And then of course we also have the 4/20 rally every year, which is actually just a giant weed farmer's market and paraphernalia trade show (with a stage with speeches to that it can disguise itself as a protest), which anyone can go to.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • LongestRoadLongestRoad Posts: 325
    why the fuck would rehab clinics be lobbying to keep weed illegal? who goes to rehab for weed?

    I agree, though, that the medicinal properties that people are waking up to with weed are enough to keep big pharma on the offensive and it will be just as difficult at the federal level to get weed legalized as it would to change 2A. 
    Tobacco got weed illegal so they didn't have competition. Rehab lobbying to keep weed illigal keeps people addicted to other addictive drugs equals more people in rehab, more profits. Big pharma same as rehab, more people using legal weed less people using other drugs that make them profits. and legal weed means less people being convicted of drug use and sent to rehab. less profits for greedy companies is a no no in their book. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,737
    A brief refresher course:

    The Difference between “Less” and “Fewer”

    Fewer means “not as many.” We use fewer with countable nouns like cookies.

    Example:  Cookie Monster was told to eat fewer cookies.

    Less means “not as much.” We use less with uncountable nouns like milk.

    Example:  Could you give Cookie Monster less milk next time?



    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





  • BLACK35BLACK35 Hanover, Ontario Posts: 20,783
    Shrooms are awesome, been awhile since I have ate them. Was usually long weekends when camping, great for around the camp fire. To answer someone above about taste, they taste gross. I just jam them in my mouth and swallow with some water :) I don't eat any mushrooms but the magic kind lol. I won't even eat pizza if there is mushrooms on it, might pick them off though, depends how hungry I am lol.
    2005 - London
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    2016 - Ft. Lauderdale, Miami, Ottawa, Toronto 1
    2018 - Fenway 1&2
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,465
    I read this "article", which is really mostly marketing, from a link on the Vancouver Sun newspaper. Their concept seems to be to take the guesswork out of it for the inexperienced user and emulate the medical model. 

    https://www.thegrowthop.com/cannabis-business/cannabis-experts/could-a-pen-be-mightier-than-a-pill

    In a survey conducted by Nanos Research in 2017, 80 percent of respondents admitted receiving a prescription in the past six months. What’s baffling? Many don’t take them, as highlighted in an NYT analysis last year.

    Reasons being:
    People don’t understand the value of what they’re prescribed.
    People forget to take them — a whopping 60 percent of them.
    People are confused by the complex drug regimens.

    So, imagine one’s surprise and piqued interest in coming across a solution to the aforementioned crisis in the form of a pen. Yes, you heard that right. This pen not only made it to TIME magazine’s 25 Best Inventions of 2016 list but is also described as “cannabis that could replace pills”.

    Meet dosist, an award-winning wellness company (Fast Company listed it as one of 2018’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in the health sector). Dosist has been working in the Canadian market for a year but remains unavailable for purchase as cannabis concentrates and vaporizers are not included in Bill C-45. The exclusion prompted the company to launch an advocacy campaign—using the line “Not Available in Canada”—urging the government to swiftly legalize and regulate concentrates and vape pens, supported by a call to action rallying Canadians to email their MPs.

    “As part of our advocacy, we have a whole bunch of billboards in Toronto and Vancouver stating that our products are not available,” explains Josh Campbell, President of dosist, adding, “For a novice user or a 35-year-old-mum who wants to try cannabis, the current environment will be very challenging. So we are asking Canadians: here are the facts, write to your MP, and urge them to allow dose control technology.”

    What is dosist and do we really need it in Canada?

    Formerly known as hmbldt, dosist is derived from dosis, the Greek word for dose, or more precisely, “an exact portion prescribed, literally a giving or gift.” Hence, the company tagline: “delivering health and happiness”. Founded in 2016, dosist aims to deliver safe and targeted solutions to common ailments through its six blends: calm, sleep, relief, arouse, bliss, and passion.

    “If you want to go to sleep, do you want to figure out what OG Kush does for you? No, you want to buy a product that helps you sleep,” says Josh Campbell, explaining the straightforward nature of the pen and its blends. “People believe cannabis is simply about intoxication, which is not correct. It’s to be calmer, to be more relaxed, for sleep and pain management, and good sexual health.”

    Dosist’s unique offering is their dose pen, which was designed to accurately and appropriately deliver a targeted dose of cannabis oil. It is one of the only vaporization devices that delivers a metered dosage upon activation. The oil is heated to a perfect temperature each time so that potential medical properties of cannabis can be used to their utmost potential.

    Using CO2 extraction and pesticide-free products, CBD, THC and the terpenes are pulled out, and then re-formulated back together. The products also feature an intuitive design that vibrates after a complete 2.25mg dose, ensuring a consistent, and effective experience.

    The pens are currently available in California and sold primarily through a network of dispensaries. When it comes to Canada, the company is solely focused on its lobbying efforts. Earlier in May 2018, Campbell testified to the Canadian Senate on recommendations to The Cannabis Act.

    (article continues..)

    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,737
    I read this "article", which is really mostly marketing, from a link on the Vancouver Sun newspaper. Their concept seems to be to take the guesswork out of it for the inexperienced user and emulate the medical model. 

    https://www.thegrowthop.com/cannabis-business/cannabis-experts/could-a-pen-be-mightier-than-a-pill

    In a survey conducted by Nanos Research in 2017, 80 percent of respondents admitted receiving a prescription in the past six months. What’s baffling? Many don’t take them, as highlighted in an NYT analysis last year.

    Reasons being:
    People don’t understand the value of what they’re prescribed.
    People forget to take them — a whopping 60 percent of them.
    People are confused by the complex drug regimens.

    So, imagine one’s surprise and piqued interest in coming across a solution to the aforementioned crisis in the form of a pen. Yes, you heard that right. This pen not only made it to TIME magazine’s 25 Best Inventions of 2016 list but is also described as “cannabis that could replace pills”.

    Meet dosist, an award-winning wellness company (Fast Company listed it as one of 2018’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in the health sector). Dosist has been working in the Canadian market for a year but remains unavailable for purchase as cannabis concentrates and vaporizers are not included in Bill C-45. The exclusion prompted the company to launch an advocacy campaign—using the line “Not Available in Canada”—urging the government to swiftly legalize and regulate concentrates and vape pens, supported by a call to action rallying Canadians to email their MPs.

    “As part of our advocacy, we have a whole bunch of billboards in Toronto and Vancouver stating that our products are not available,” explains Josh Campbell, President of dosist, adding, “For a novice user or a 35-year-old-mum who wants to try cannabis, the current environment will be very challenging. So we are asking Canadians: here are the facts, write to your MP, and urge them to allow dose control technology.”

    What is dosist and do we really need it in Canada?

    Formerly known as hmbldt, dosist is derived from dosis, the Greek word for dose, or more precisely, “an exact portion prescribed, literally a giving or gift.” Hence, the company tagline: “delivering health and happiness”. Founded in 2016, dosist aims to deliver safe and targeted solutions to common ailments through its six blends: calm, sleep, relief, arouse, bliss, and passion.

    “If you want to go to sleep, do you want to figure out what OG Kush does for you? No, you want to buy a product that helps you sleep,” says Josh Campbell, explaining the straightforward nature of the pen and its blends. “People believe cannabis is simply about intoxication, which is not correct. It’s to be calmer, to be more relaxed, for sleep and pain management, and good sexual health.”

    Dosist’s unique offering is their dose pen, which was designed to accurately and appropriately deliver a targeted dose of cannabis oil. It is one of the only vaporization devices that delivers a metered dosage upon activation. The oil is heated to a perfect temperature each time so that potential medical properties of cannabis can be used to their utmost potential.

    Using CO2 extraction and pesticide-free products, CBD, THC and the terpenes are pulled out, and then re-formulated back together. The products also feature an intuitive design that vibrates after a complete 2.25mg dose, ensuring a consistent, and effective experience.

    The pens are currently available in California and sold primarily through a network of dispensaries. When it comes to Canada, the company is solely focused on its lobbying efforts. Earlier in May 2018, Campbell testified to the Canadian Senate on recommendations to The Cannabis Act.

    (article continues..)

    I saw these in a dispensary in Sacramento.  They were a bit pricey so I figured I'd wait and see if the price comes down eventually.  Looks like a good product.
    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,465
    brianlux said:
    I read this "article", which is really mostly marketing, from a link on the Vancouver Sun newspaper. Their concept seems to be to take the guesswork out of it for the inexperienced user and emulate the medical model. 

    https://www.thegrowthop.com/cannabis-business/cannabis-experts/could-a-pen-be-mightier-than-a-pill

    In a survey conducted by Nanos Research in 2017, 80 percent of respondents admitted receiving a prescription in the past six months. What’s baffling? Many don’t take them, as highlighted in an NYT analysis last year.

    Reasons being:
    People don’t understand the value of what they’re prescribed.
    People forget to take them — a whopping 60 percent of them.
    People are confused by the complex drug regimens.

    So, imagine one’s surprise and piqued interest in coming across a solution to the aforementioned crisis in the form of a pen. Yes, you heard that right. This pen not only made it to TIME magazine’s 25 Best Inventions of 2016 list but is also described as “cannabis that could replace pills”.

    Meet dosist, an award-winning wellness company (Fast Company listed it as one of 2018’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in the health sector). Dosist has been working in the Canadian market for a year but remains unavailable for purchase as cannabis concentrates and vaporizers are not included in Bill C-45. The exclusion prompted the company to launch an advocacy campaign—using the line “Not Available in Canada”—urging the government to swiftly legalize and regulate concentrates and vape pens, supported by a call to action rallying Canadians to email their MPs.

    “As part of our advocacy, we have a whole bunch of billboards in Toronto and Vancouver stating that our products are not available,” explains Josh Campbell, President of dosist, adding, “For a novice user or a 35-year-old-mum who wants to try cannabis, the current environment will be very challenging. So we are asking Canadians: here are the facts, write to your MP, and urge them to allow dose control technology.”

    What is dosist and do we really need it in Canada?

    Formerly known as hmbldt, dosist is derived from dosis, the Greek word for dose, or more precisely, “an exact portion prescribed, literally a giving or gift.” Hence, the company tagline: “delivering health and happiness”. Founded in 2016, dosist aims to deliver safe and targeted solutions to common ailments through its six blends: calm, sleep, relief, arouse, bliss, and passion.

    “If you want to go to sleep, do you want to figure out what OG Kush does for you? No, you want to buy a product that helps you sleep,” says Josh Campbell, explaining the straightforward nature of the pen and its blends. “People believe cannabis is simply about intoxication, which is not correct. It’s to be calmer, to be more relaxed, for sleep and pain management, and good sexual health.”

    Dosist’s unique offering is their dose pen, which was designed to accurately and appropriately deliver a targeted dose of cannabis oil. It is one of the only vaporization devices that delivers a metered dosage upon activation. The oil is heated to a perfect temperature each time so that potential medical properties of cannabis can be used to their utmost potential.

    Using CO2 extraction and pesticide-free products, CBD, THC and the terpenes are pulled out, and then re-formulated back together. The products also feature an intuitive design that vibrates after a complete 2.25mg dose, ensuring a consistent, and effective experience.

    The pens are currently available in California and sold primarily through a network of dispensaries. When it comes to Canada, the company is solely focused on its lobbying efforts. Earlier in May 2018, Campbell testified to the Canadian Senate on recommendations to The Cannabis Act.

    (article continues..)

    I saw these in a dispensary in Sacramento.  They were a bit pricey so I figured I'd wait and see if the price comes down eventually.  Looks like a good product.
    They are certainly on point with their packaging and marketing, I'll say that for them. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    BLACK35 said:
    Shrooms are awesome, been awhile since I have ate them. Was usually long weekends when camping, great for around the camp fire. To answer someone above about taste, they taste gross. I just jam them in my mouth and swallow with some water :) I don't eat any mushrooms but the magic kind lol. I won't even eat pizza if there is mushrooms on it, might pick them off though, depends how hungry I am lol.
    Yeah, they're disgusting... but the taste of magic mushrooms has absolutely no relation to the taste of regular mushrooms you normally put in your food. Nobody who generally likes mushrooms is going to come close to liking the taste of these. I'm not sure poo would taste much worse, lol.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • my2handsmy2hands Posts: 15,235
    how is it looking up in Massachusetts? (asks the guy with a pair of tix for Fenway lol) 
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 19,363
    Now i've made my own Tincture and i like it too just do 1ml about 17 drops worth in a glass of water or juice 30 mnts i'm crusing along fine ...I like edibles or tinctures with edibles i know 1 hr into it i'll be getting high i smoke when i'm home mostly on weekends but nowhere as much as i use to yrs ago ...My days of buying weed are over now i grow my own ..
    NY is getting ready to decriminalize it!

    recreational use is on the ballot.

    Both Cuomo and Deblasio are on board if you can believe that?!?
    I’d be shocked if it passes .
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 19,363
    PJ_Soul said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    my2hands said:
    my2hands said:
    vaggar99 said:
    if you've ever tried LSD, a strong edible is similar.
    It is nowhere near similar my friend. Not even close
    +1
    not even in the same league!

    not even the same galaxy lol
    No. Closer to shrooms IMO, if you have to compare it to another drug.
    Never had shrooms myself.  I'm curious.  Just don't know if I'm that curious.
    amazing. haven't done them in about 15 years as we were camping and an outside force kind of made me have a bad trip, but every other single time was awesome. 
    Whats the taste like.  I'm Avery fussy eater...
    kinda gross, but a necessary evil. people do things to mitigate that. I never did. I just closed my eyes and chewed. 
    They are horrible. I can't do what you do - I literally vomit. I've found the best way is to completely mask it by grinding them up and putting them into melted chocolate (cooled - don't cook the shrooms), and letting them solidify. That's just a yummy treat. The second best way is probably to sandwich them between Harvest Cheddar SunChips, lol, and scarf that down as quickly as possible.
    I lived in Orlando in 90 we used to get go and pick our own shrooms from cow farms they grow right from cow dong we would go right after it rained it always rains mid day or early morning , we made ice tea and then squeezed all of the tea juice for us to drink and then put shrooms on top of pizza talk about great trips actually cartoon land magic ...
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,465
    Not good. Too many people fool themselves into believing that because weed is “natural” it is also harmless and has no negative consequences. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
    Not good. Too many people fool themselves into believing that because weed is “natural” it is also harmless and has no negative consequences. 
    That's always been my concern.  The dipshits driving high. 
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
  • BLACK35BLACK35 Hanover, Ontario Posts: 20,783
    That is too funny of a list, somebody needs to wake up!!
    2005 - London
    2009 - Toronto
    2010 - Buffalo
    2011 - Toronto 1&2
    2013 - London, Pittsburgh, Buffalo
    2014 - Cincinnati, St. Louis, Detroit
    2016 - Ft. Lauderdale, Miami, Ottawa, Toronto 1
    2018 - Fenway 1&2
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,396
    BLACK35 said:
    That is too funny of a list, somebody needs to wake up!!
    I agree ... 
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