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A sensible, hope filled all-purpose heavy duty Global Warming/ Climate Change thread.

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  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    brianlux said:
    As per the above last few posts, at what point do we say, "Enough! , from now on I'm voting for the strong environmental candidates?  (In other words, Green Party or similar candidates.)

    I know, a lot of people are going to say, "But why do that?  Why throw your vote away on a candidate that is going to lose anyway?"  
    Perhaps the response to that could be, "Yes, true, as long as people keep voting for candidates that are not truly committed to improving environment, Green Party candidates and the like will lose and so will the environment, and so will we.  You get what you vote for."

    And then the day will come when more and more people are dying due to extreme weather events, and when suburbs become unsustainable, and more and more parts of the oceans experience ecological collapse, and when food becomes more and more scarce, and when clean water becomes more difficult to obtain.  How far off is all that?  And will we wait until all that happens and then say, "Ah fuck!  Why didn't we vote in candidates that are strong on environmental protection?"

    What are we waiting for?
    you know what Brian? you're right. I'll check out the platform of my green party and see what my options are for the upcoming federal election. 

    :plus_one:             

    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • Lerxst1992Lerxst1992 Posts: 4,133
    A massive cat 4 hurricane with gusts up to 180 mph slams into New Orleans and reports are tragic that six lives were lost.


    the storm travels 1200 miles over land, “weakens” and  gets downgraded to a tropical depression, but intensifies as it reaches the northeast in an unprecedented manner, and 43 lives are lost in the NYC region.

    this seems impossible. Out of curiosity I checked the ocean temp near where Ida was able to pull in ocean moisture in Cape May, NJ during the storm…nearly 80 degrees, almost five degrees greater than the average water temp for 9/2 over the past ten years. Ida got close to the ocean in NJ and fell in love with her tropical waters. NJ, the new Caribbean destination.

    two record breaking rain events for NY metro in a week. Yet we will hear the senate tell us later this month climate change is science fiction.




    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=newssearch&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwi06bLj6uHyAhWAF1kFHXl3BxQQxfQBMAJ6BAgJEAM&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nbcnews.com%2Fnews%2Fus-news%2Flive-blog%2Fhurricane-ida-live-updates-8-31-n1278111&usg=AOvVaw0r1gX50fEexrl2DWOLZl5j


    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=newssearch&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjzrszA6-HyAhXmYN8KHRooC64QxfQBMAB6BAgLEAM&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2Flive%2F2021%2F09%2F02%2Fnyregion%2Fnyc-storm&usg=AOvVaw2LR1Uvi-kHXmXtaXhRuyfq
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    edited September 3
    A massive cat 4 hurricane with gusts up to 180 mph slams into New Orleans and reports are tragic that six lives were lost.


    the storm travels 1200 miles over land, “weakens” and  gets downgraded to a tropical depression, but intensifies as it reaches the northeast in an unprecedented manner, and 43 lives are lost in the NYC region.

    this seems impossible. Out of curiosity I checked the ocean temp near where Ida was able to pull in ocean moisture in Cape May, NJ during the storm…nearly 80 degrees, almost five degrees greater than the average water temp for 9/2 over the past ten years. Ida got close to the ocean in NJ and fell in love with her tropical waters. NJ, the new Caribbean destination.

    two record breaking rain events for NY metro in a week. Yet we will hear the senate tell us later this month climate change is science fiction.




    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=newssearch&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwi06bLj6uHyAhWAF1kFHXl3BxQQxfQBMAJ6BAgJEAM&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nbcnews.com%2Fnews%2Fus-news%2Flive-blog%2Fhurricane-ida-live-updates-8-31-n1278111&usg=AOvVaw0r1gX50fEexrl2DWOLZl5j


    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=newssearch&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjzrszA6-HyAhXmYN8KHRooC64QxfQBMAB6BAgLEAM&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2Flive%2F2021%2F09%2F02%2Fnyregion%2Fnyc-storm&usg=AOvVaw2LR1Uvi-kHXmXtaXhRuyfq

    "Yet we will hear the senate tell us later this month climate change is science fiction." 
    That's crazy!  Someone in the Senate believes this?  If you have them, could you provide some links on this*.  I'd like to know who in the Senate is that far out to lunch.
    We've talked about this before so I'm sure we all know that local weather is not the same as global climate.  So when we take into account all the extreme weather related incidents across the planet, including the huge amount of ice loss, I'm not sure how anyone could deny climate change at this point unless they are simply crazy or trolling the world.
    *Edit, even better, if you can, maybe just copy and paste some of the info.  Thanks!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,652
    So we have had two torrential down pours here in NY this summer.  The city and it's surrounding are just not made to withstand 5" or more of rain.  

    If you've ever lived in the desert and saw a storm happen there then that is what is happening here.  Too much water too fast with nowhere to go.  The streets become small rivers, low lying areas become lakes and the subways become the drain in a bath tub.

    Mind you I spent the last few years installing things around the city to prevent the subways from flooding but the city has yet to deploy them.
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 7,914
    I have been through three 100 to 1000 year events in the past five years.  I should play the lottery. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    I have been through three 100 to 1000 year events in the past five years.  I should play the lottery. 

    And win so you can go somewhere safe!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 22,780
     By Ian Livingston

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2021/09/03/hurricane-ida-numbers-surge-wind-pressure-damage/



     Ida’s impact from the Gulf Coast to Northeast — by the numbers
    By Ian Livingston
    September 03 at 11:17 AM ET
    Hurricane Ida made landfall near Port Fourchon, La., as a strengthening Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 150 mph. Just shy of a Category 5, Ida delivered a disastrous blow on arrival, coinciding with the 16-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.
    But Ida held its most devastating punch for its departure, triggering one of the worst urban flood disasters in U.S. history in the Northeast.
    The storm and its remnants have caused almost four dozen confirmed fatalities, the majority due to flooding in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Connecticut. This death toll is expected to rise.
    The name Ida will almost surely be retired due to its costs to life and property. It was the sixth named storm to make landfall in the United States during the 2021 season, which is still approaching its peak.
    [In the history of hurricane names, ‘I’ stands for infamous]
    Below, we’ve compiled Ida’s key stats to date.
    First (tied) — Ida’s rank in Louisiana’s hurricane history for winds
    With sustained winds of 150 mph at landfall, Ida tied the Last Island Hurricane in 1856 and Hurricane Laura in 2020 as the strongest to strike Louisiana, based on wind speed. The sequence of Laura and Ida marked the first time any state has seen two 150 mph hurricane landfalls in consecutive years.
    Ida also tied as the fifth-strongest storm to make landfall anywhere in the United States, based on wind speed.
    Ida’s registered a peak wind gust of 172 mph, near the landfall point in Port Fourchon.
    [Before and after images show the devastation from Hurricane Ida]
    3 days — Ida went from a mass of showers to a strong Category 4 hurricane
    In a warming world, it is expected that more tropical systems will feed off warmer water to undergo rapid intensification, defined as at least a 35 mph gain over 24 hours. Ida turned from showers to a monster 150 mph hurricane in three days. In its final day over water, Ida gained 65 mph, tying it with Humberto in 2007 for the most significant intensification burst into landfall, according to the Associated Press.
    [How climate change helped make Hurricane Ida one of Louisiana’s worst]
    Six — Number of states where tornadoes touched down
    Tornadoes are a typical aspect of tropical systems, especially when storms come out of the Gulf of Mexico and meander over land afterward. At least six states, stretching from the Mississippi coast to Cape Cod in Massachusetts, saw tornado touchdowns. Several people were injured in Alabama shortly after landfall.
    [New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland slammed by tornadoes from Ida’s remnants]
    On Sept. 1, Ida’s remnants delivered a regional tornado outbreak to the northern Mid-Atlantic. Several tornadoes in this part of the event were unusually strong for tropical remnants, probably in part due to the storm transitioning to an extratropical system featuring a warm front and a cold front.
    Among the tornadoes assessed thus far, the one that passed through Mullica Hill, N.J., about 10 miles south of Philadelphia, received an EF3 rating on the 0 to 5 scale for intensity, the strongest to hit the state in 31 years. Farther south, an EF2 struck portions of Annapolis, the capital of Maryland.
    [Inside the Annapolis tornado: How Ida powered this destructive storm]
    Seven — Number of major hurricanes that have hit the Lower 48 and Puerto Rico since 2017
    Between Hurricane Wilma in late 2005 and Hurricane Harvey in 2017, no hurricanes higher than a Category 2 hit the United States or Puerto Rico. But including Harvey, there have been seven Category 3-plus “major” hurricane strikes since. In addition to the rare Category 5 in Michael, Ida was the fifth Category 4 of the bunch to make landfall; four of them came ashore along the Gulf Coast.
    2020 marked a record-breaking year, with 11 U.S. landfalls of named tropical systems. Ida was the sixth named storm to make landfall in the country in 2021, setting up another high landfall year for the United States
    9 hours — Time from landfall to Ida dropping below Category 3
    Most hurricanes rapidly weaken once they hit land, but Ida remained a major hurricane for nine hours. Ida made first landfall around 12:55 p.m. Five hours later, it was still a Category 4 with 130 mph winds. It didn’t drop below major hurricane status until 9 p.m., finally becoming a tropical storm sometime before 4 a.m. the day after landfall.
    This super slow decrease in intensity was probably due to southern Louisiana marshlands being overcome with warm surge water, plus the fact that it was strengthening until it came ashore.
    10-plus feet — Storm surge inundated coastal areas
    Storm surge heights between about eight feet and 10 feet have been observed. It is likely that higher surge occurred in areas with no easy way to measure it, and post-storm analysis will seek out those heights. Maximum forecasts were for a surge of 12 to 16 feet. Waves offshore were measured by satellite to be as high as 38 feet.
    The Mississippi River reversed flow for around three hours as surge was pushed out of the ocean, but the major levee improvements in New Orleans after Katrina withstood the test.
    [In hardest slam since Katrina, New Orleans’s levees stand firm]
    17 inches — Ida’s rain flooded areas around New Orleans, Philadelphia and New York City
    Radar estimates of up to about 17 inches were recorded just west of New Orleans. A station eight miles south-southeast of Slidell, La., tallied 15.73 inches, the maximum recorded by a ground station thus far, with 10-inch-plus numbers common in that region.
    As Ida moved toward the Northeast, a widespread three to eight inches of rain was reported from northern Maryland through southern New England.
    Newark picked up 8.44 inches, its wettest day on record, with Central Park in New York City coming in at 7.19 inches, its fifth-wettest day. Record-setting rainfall rates of three inches or more in an hour caused devastating flooding.
    [Here’s what made the New York City flooding so devastating]
    The torrents triggered flash-flood emergency declarations from south-central Pennsylvania to southern New England, including the first issued in New York City.
    River levels surged because of the deluge. The Schuylkill River in Philadelphia rose to 16.35 feet, its second-highest level on record. Evan Dethier, a postdoctoral fellow at Dartmouth College, found seven rivers in the Northeast recorded all-time peak floods while 55 recorded floods ranking in the top five.


    continues....


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  • Deblasio the Mayor for NYC has stated that these events(recent torrential downpours of 5+ inches) are the norm now and they will do a better job of warning the people.

    If anyone saw what happened in Jersey and NYC and this is the new normal?

    Good luck everyone.  You'll need flood insurance on higher ground.

    Crazy.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    Deblasio the Mayor for NYC has stated that these events(recent torrential downpours of 5+ inches) are the norm now and they will do a better job of warning the people.

    If anyone saw what happened in Jersey and NYC and this is the new normal?

    Good luck everyone.  You'll need flood insurance on higher ground.

    Crazy.

    This leads to a topic that we will probably all be considering something more or more in the near future, if not already:  How to prepare for and react to the affects of climate change.
    Pretty much anyone with a half way functional brain now recognizes that climate change is real (interesting and tragic how it took so long for that acceptance to happen), so now the question is, what are people doing in response to this new reality?  My wife and I, for example, are having to face the reality that if we do not move, we will be sucking really bad air into our lungs for at least four months out of each year and during those months will also have to live with the anxiety of a the possibility of a devastating wildfire hitting our neighborhood.
    But how many of us have the means to move and where are we going to move to anyway?  All the "good" spots are going to be taken by the wealthiest among us and many among us cannot move due to one's employment situation.  So if a person or family are not able to move, will they be able to protect themselves from catastrophe?  Will they be able to attain or even afford fire, flood, or hurricane insurance?  And if not, how will they recover if a fire, flood, or hurricane hits their home?
    And what will the widespread affect be of more and more people losing their home and or belongings and not having the ability to recover?
    This is why I insist that having a child in today's world makes little or no sense.  I know that sounds off-topic, but I know a few people who are pregnant or planning on having a baby and I find mind self automatically concerned that these kids are being brought into a world  will find it very, very difficult to navigate through life by the time they are adults. 
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 9,413

    Give Peas A Chance…
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105


    Haha!  Love it!

    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • ZodZod Posts: 7,870
    brianlux said:
    Deblasio the Mayor for NYC has stated that these events(recent torrential downpours of 5+ inches) are the norm now and they will do a better job of warning the people.

    If anyone saw what happened in Jersey and NYC and this is the new normal?

    Good luck everyone.  You'll need flood insurance on higher ground.

    Crazy.

    This leads to a topic that we will probably all be considering something more or more in the near future, if not already:  How to prepare for and react to the affects of climate change.
    Pretty much anyone with a half way functional brain now recognizes that climate change is real (interesting and tragic how it took so long for that acceptance to happen), so now the question is, what are people doing in response to this new reality?  My wife and I, for example, are having to face the reality that if we do not move, we will be sucking really bad air into our lungs for at least four months out of each year and during those months will also have to live with the anxiety of a the possibility of a devastating wildfire hitting our neighborhood.
    But how many of us have the means to move and where are we going to move to anyway?  All the "good" spots are going to be taken by the wealthiest among us and many among us cannot move due to one's employment situation.  So if a person or family are not able to move, will they be able to protect themselves from catastrophe?  Will they be able to attain or even afford fire, flood, or hurricane insurance?  And if not, how will they recover if a fire, flood, or hurricane hits their home?
    And what will the widespread affect be of more and more people losing their home and or belongings and not having the ability to recover?
    This is why I insist that having a child in today's world makes little or no sense.  I know that sounds off-topic, but I know a few people who are pregnant or planning on having a baby and I find mind self automatically concerned that these kids are being brought into a world  will find it very, very difficult to navigate through life by the time they are adults. 

    Yah.  I live in BC, and the Island I live on is the least likely place to get smoke, because as long as the wind is blow from the west it's fresh air off the pacific.  We tend to get smoke when the air gets stagnate or blows from a different direction. but usually that's temporary, so maybe a week or two of smoke is the worst we've seen.

    The challenge is the interior of our province has had multiple years of smoke filled summers.   Cost of living is already getting pretty high here... I wonder what will happen of the population from the interior of our province attempts to migrate to the coast...

    I also agree on kids.   My original reason was something else, but each passing day I'm kind of glad I didn't go that route.  Not because kids are bad, but what's the world going to be like in 80 to 100 years.    It doesn't seem great.  Everything continues to get more crowded, and more polluted.   Global warming is having bigger consequences.   We don't seem anywhere close to achieving emission targets.   We also import so much stuff from China and similar countries, where they do our manufacturing.  So even though maybe we cleanup our air a bit, we're pretty culpable for countries like China are doing to the planet.

    sigh....
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    Zod said:
    brianlux said:
    Deblasio the Mayor for NYC has stated that these events(recent torrential downpours of 5+ inches) are the norm now and they will do a better job of warning the people.

    If anyone saw what happened in Jersey and NYC and this is the new normal?

    Good luck everyone.  You'll need flood insurance on higher ground.

    Crazy.

    This leads to a topic that we will probably all be considering something more or more in the near future, if not already:  How to prepare for and react to the affects of climate change.
    Pretty much anyone with a half way functional brain now recognizes that climate change is real (interesting and tragic how it took so long for that acceptance to happen), so now the question is, what are people doing in response to this new reality?  My wife and I, for example, are having to face the reality that if we do not move, we will be sucking really bad air into our lungs for at least four months out of each year and during those months will also have to live with the anxiety of a the possibility of a devastating wildfire hitting our neighborhood.
    But how many of us have the means to move and where are we going to move to anyway?  All the "good" spots are going to be taken by the wealthiest among us and many among us cannot move due to one's employment situation.  So if a person or family are not able to move, will they be able to protect themselves from catastrophe?  Will they be able to attain or even afford fire, flood, or hurricane insurance?  And if not, how will they recover if a fire, flood, or hurricane hits their home?
    And what will the widespread affect be of more and more people losing their home and or belongings and not having the ability to recover?
    This is why I insist that having a child in today's world makes little or no sense.  I know that sounds off-topic, but I know a few people who are pregnant or planning on having a baby and I find mind self automatically concerned that these kids are being brought into a world  will find it very, very difficult to navigate through life by the time they are adults. 

    Yah.  I live in BC, and the Island I live on is the least likely place to get smoke, because as long as the wind is blow from the west it's fresh air off the pacific.  We tend to get smoke when the air gets stagnate or blows from a different direction. but usually that's temporary, so maybe a week or two of smoke is the worst we've seen.

    The challenge is the interior of our province has had multiple years of smoke filled summers.   Cost of living is already getting pretty high here... I wonder what will happen of the population from the interior of our province attempts to migrate to the coast...

    I also agree on kids.   My original reason was something else, but each passing day I'm kind of glad I didn't go that route.  Not because kids are bad, but what's the world going to be like in 80 to 100 years.    It doesn't seem great.  Everything continues to get more crowded, and more polluted.   Global warming is having bigger consequences.   We don't seem anywhere close to achieving emission targets.   We also import so much stuff from China and similar countries, where they do our manufacturing.  So even though maybe we cleanup our air a bit, we're pretty culpable for countries like China are doing to the planet.

    sigh....

    Yeah, truthfully I think most kids are great.  I know for a lot of people want kids, especially for women because it a strong natural urge to want to have a baby.   And pre-industrial era, it made sense to have lots of kids.  But now, in these modern times, there are very good reasons to not have kids, and there are plenty of opportunities to be a parent without having a kid.  Adopting is one obvious choice.  I know that can be complicated and very difficult in some places, but there are other options.  I helped raise my nephews because their parents needed the help.  It was a great "parenting" experience for me and them.  Adults can also be Big Brother and Big Sisters.  Lots of churches have opportunities to work with kids- and some that are not so religiously focused.   The church I went to as a kid had this thing called "Teen Time".  We had dinner as a group and fun activities.  I wasn't much on religion but it was still fun and the only time I didn't like it was when my pet chicken died on the same day as Teen Time and guess what was served for dinner?  Yep, true story!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,237
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    funny, i had this same idea this summer when manitoba was covered with BC wildfire smoke. I thought the same as Bill mentions here, if we have oil pipelines, why not water?

    it seemed like such an obvious idea, I then started to doubt it. LOL. but there won't be enough (or any) profit in it, so it will have to be done by government. 

    and we wait......
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    funny, i had this same idea this summer when manitoba was covered with BC wildfire smoke. I thought the same as Bill mentions here, if we have oil pipelines, why not water?

    it seemed like such an obvious idea, I then started to doubt it. LOL. but there won't be enough (or any) profit in it, so it will have to be done by government. 

    and we wait......

    Good point... I'm afraid.  :frowning:
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tishtish Neither here, nor therePosts: 3,809
    brianlux said:
    As per the above last few posts, at what point do we say, "Enough! , from now on I'm voting for the strong environmental candidates?  (In other words, Green Party or similar candidates.)

    I know, a lot of people are going to say, "But why do that?  Why throw your vote away on a candidate that is going to lose anyway?"  
    Perhaps the response to that could be, "Yes, true, as long as people keep voting for candidates that are not truly committed to improving environment, Green Party candidates and the like will lose and so will the environment, and so will we.  You get what you vote for."

    And then the day will come when more and more people are dying due to extreme weather events, and when suburbs become unsustainable, and more and more parts of the oceans experience ecological collapse, and when food becomes more and more scarce, and when clean water becomes more difficult to obtain.  How far off is all that?  And will we wait until all that happens and then say, "Ah fuck!  Why didn't we vote in candidates that are strong on environmental protection?"

    What are we waiting for?
    +1
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,237
    I told my girls on the weekend again to think really long and hard when they are older when they are of child bearing ages. I said it's not out of the realm of possibility that much of the summer in 30-40 years will be unbearably hot and you'll just spend your days rationing air conditioning because it will be in so much use the grids will probably go down repeatedly. 

    I fear for them. 
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 9,413
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    First you have to capture all that excess rain water, and what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?  Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.

    build desalination plants, yes.

    I live in the Great Lakes region and I know their are treaties that govern who can take water out of the lakes?  So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?  Hoe long would it take for California to use up storm water from that storm.

    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.
    Give Peas A Chance…
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    First you have to capture all that excess rain water, and what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?  Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.

    build desalination plants, yes.

    I live in the Great Lakes region and I know their are treaties that govern who can take water out of the lakes?  So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?  Hoe long would it take for California to use up storm water from that storm.

    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.

    what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?
    What makes me think?  My brain and my willingness to use it.  And because you are so sweet and kind and full of love, love, love.  *Heart*
    Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.
    Oh no I don't!  I was born here in 1951 and had nothing to do with my birth.  Besides, the population at that time was about 28% of what it is today.  AND I never reproduced.  AND the whole friggin world is overpopulated, but you knew that.  AND your part of the world has a greater density of population and relies on the food we export.
    So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?
    Sure it is.  There are pipelines all over the place that carry toxic materials like gas and oil.  At least this would be a clean pipeline.
    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.
    Agreed on desalinization.  If Israel can do it, we can do it.
    Mother Nature doesn't need to cooperate.  She is doing what she does which is to work hard to restore the balance of nature.  That is why we have COVID and wildfires and hurricanes and floods, etc...  We are the ones who need to cooperate by lowering our reproduction rate and living lighter on this earth that sustains us. 
    And therein lies the crux of the situation.  Pipelines and desalinization are artificial solutions to human caused problems and until we learn to live in balance with nature, we will continue to have these problems.  But I still think the water pipeline is a good idea because until we do that, we need water- plain and simple. 

    And why are you so adverse to sharing in the first place?  The west grows more food than we consume.  Do you want us to stop sharing it?  What about the technology that comes from California?  Should we keep that to ourselves as well. 

    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,237
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    First you have to capture all that excess rain water, and what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?  Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.

    build desalination plants, yes.

    I live in the Great Lakes region and I know their are treaties that govern who can take water out of the lakes?  So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?  Hoe long would it take for California to use up storm water from that storm.

    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.
    this right here is the exact selfish garbage attitude that is going to keep us going down that path. like you only consume resources that are from the vicinity you live in. grow up. 
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 9,413
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    First you have to capture all that excess rain water, and what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?  Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.

    build desalination plants, yes.

    I live in the Great Lakes region and I know their are treaties that govern who can take water out of the lakes?  So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?  Hoe long would it take for California to use up storm water from that storm.

    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.

    what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?
    What makes me think?  My brain and my willingness to use it.  And because you are so sweet and kind and full of love, love, love.  *Heart*
    Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.
    Oh no I don't!  I was born here in 1951 and had nothing to do with my birth.  Besides, the population at that time was about 28% of what it is today.  AND I never reproduced.  AND the whole friggin world is overpopulated, but you knew that.  AND your part of the world has a greater density of population and relies on the food we export.
    So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?
    Sure it is.  There are pipelines all over the place that carry toxic materials like gas and oil.  At least this would be a clean pipeline.
    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.
    Agreed on desalinization.  If Israel can do it, we can do it.
    Mother Nature doesn't need to cooperate.  She is doing what she does which is to work hard to restore the balance of nature.  That is why we have COVID and wildfires and hurricanes and floods, etc...  We are the ones who need to cooperate by lowering our reproduction rate and living lighter on this earth that sustains us. 
    And therein lies the crux of the situation.  Pipelines and desalinization are artificial solutions to human caused problems and until we learn to live in balance with nature, we will continue to have these problems.  But I still think the water pipeline is a good idea because until we do that, we need water- plain and simple. 

    And why are you so adverse to sharing in the first place?  The west grows more food than we consume.  Do you want us to stop sharing it?  What about the technology that comes from California?  Should we keep that to ourselves as well. 

    I’m in Canada, why would I want to share our most precious resource with the us.  Let’s get one thing straight, when US hospitals were dumping vaccines that were expired and your neighbour to North who could have used those vaccines and were begging for these vaccines your president said no..

    Life is a 2 way street…your country  couldn’t even share a life saving drug with their neighbours…

    The US is a country that is selfish and only cares about themselves anymore…
    Give Peas A Chance…
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 9,413
    it must be harder to pipe water than we think…

    hell Canada has plenty of water but we just can’t get clean drinking water to all indigenous communities.  I understand the US has this problem as well…
    Give Peas A Chance…
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    First you have to capture all that excess rain water, and what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?  Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.

    build desalination plants, yes.

    I live in the Great Lakes region and I know their are treaties that govern who can take water out of the lakes?  So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?  Hoe long would it take for California to use up storm water from that storm.

    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.

    what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?
    What makes me think?  My brain and my willingness to use it.  And because you are so sweet and kind and full of love, love, love.  *Heart*
    Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.
    Oh no I don't!  I was born here in 1951 and had nothing to do with my birth.  Besides, the population at that time was about 28% of what it is today.  AND I never reproduced.  AND the whole friggin world is overpopulated, but you knew that.  AND your part of the world has a greater density of population and relies on the food we export.
    So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?
    Sure it is.  There are pipelines all over the place that carry toxic materials like gas and oil.  At least this would be a clean pipeline.
    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.
    Agreed on desalinization.  If Israel can do it, we can do it.
    Mother Nature doesn't need to cooperate.  She is doing what she does which is to work hard to restore the balance of nature.  That is why we have COVID and wildfires and hurricanes and floods, etc...  We are the ones who need to cooperate by lowering our reproduction rate and living lighter on this earth that sustains us. 
    And therein lies the crux of the situation.  Pipelines and desalinization are artificial solutions to human caused problems and until we learn to live in balance with nature, we will continue to have these problems.  But I still think the water pipeline is a good idea because until we do that, we need water- plain and simple. 

    And why are you so adverse to sharing in the first place?  The west grows more food than we consume.  Do you want us to stop sharing it?  What about the technology that comes from California?  Should we keep that to ourselves as well. 

    I’m in Canada, why would I want to share our most precious resource with the us.  Let’s get one thing straight, when US hospitals were dumping vaccines that were expired and your neighbour to North who could have used those vaccines and were begging for these vaccines your president said no..

    Life is a 2 way street…your country  couldn’t even share a life saving drug with their neighbours…

    The US is a country that is selfish and only cares about themselves anymore…

    Well, dang!  Can't squeeze blood out of a turnip either.  I guess out here in the west we're screwed then.  Can't blame a guy for trying! 
    it must be harder to pipe water than we think…

    hell Canada has plenty of water but we just can’t get clean drinking water to all indigenous communities.  I understand the US has this problem as well…

    THAT is the damn straight shameful truth! Both countries pollute the rez.   It's a crime!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • ZodZod Posts: 7,870
    It's all good.  We've hit the fall.  It's raining again here.   Everyone will forget about global warming again until next summer :)

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    Zod said:
    It's all good.  We've hit the fall.  It's raining again here.   Everyone will forget about global warming again until next summer :)


    That's generally how it goes.  Outta sight, outta mind!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tishtish Neither here, nor therePosts: 3,809
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    First you have to capture all that excess rain water, and what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?  Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.

    build desalination plants, yes.

    I live in the Great Lakes region and I know their are treaties that govern who can take water out of the lakes?  So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?  Hoe long would it take for California to use up storm water from that storm.

    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.

    what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?
    What makes me think?  My brain and my willingness to use it.  And because you are so sweet and kind and full of love, love, love.  *Heart*
    Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.
    Oh no I don't!  I was born here in 1951 and had nothing to do with my birth.  Besides, the population at that time was about 28% of what it is today.  AND I never reproduced.  AND the whole friggin world is overpopulated, but you knew that.  AND your part of the world has a greater density of population and relies on the food we export.
    So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?
    Sure it is.  There are pipelines all over the place that carry toxic materials like gas and oil.  At least this would be a clean pipeline.
    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.
    Agreed on desalinization.  If Israel can do it, we can do it.
    Mother Nature doesn't need to cooperate.  She is doing what she does which is to work hard to restore the balance of nature.  That is why we have COVID and wildfires and hurricanes and floods, etc...  We are the ones who need to cooperate by lowering our reproduction rate and living lighter on this earth that sustains us. 
    And therein lies the crux of the situation.  Pipelines and desalinization are artificial solutions to human caused problems and until we learn to live in balance with nature, we will continue to have these problems.  But I still think the water pipeline is a good idea because until we do that, we need water- plain and simple. 

    And why are you so adverse to sharing in the first place?  The west grows more food than we consume.  Do you want us to stop sharing it?  What about the technology that comes from California?  Should we keep that to ourselves as well. 

    I’m in Canada, why would I want to share our most precious resource with the us.  Let’s get one thing straight, when US hospitals were dumping vaccines that were expired and your neighbour to North who could have used those vaccines and were begging for these vaccines your president said no..

    Life is a 2 way street…your country  couldn’t even share a life saving drug with their neighbours…

    The US is a country that is selfish and only cares about themselves anymore…
    You know they will take it by force, right? Who needs to share.
  • tishtish Neither here, nor therePosts: 3,809
    ^ Canada pulled the same me first vaccine policy, too.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,105
    tish said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Why not?!  Great idea!


    First you have to capture all that excess rain water, and what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?  Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.

    build desalination plants, yes.

    I live in the Great Lakes region and I know their are treaties that govern who can take water out of the lakes?  So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?  Hoe long would it take for California to use up storm water from that storm.

    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.

    what makes you think that those us in who have water want to share it with places that waste water?
    What makes me think?  My brain and my willingness to use it.  And because you are so sweet and kind and full of love, love, love.  *Heart*
    Have over populated their regions and continue to over populate.  You need to fix that.
    Oh no I don't!  I was born here in 1951 and had nothing to do with my birth.  Besides, the population at that time was about 28% of what it is today.  AND I never reproduced.  AND the whole friggin world is overpopulated, but you knew that.  AND your part of the world has a greater density of population and relies on the food we export.
    So it’s not so easy to just build a pipeline…and seriously Bill Maher?
    Sure it is.  There are pipelines all over the place that carry toxic materials like gas and oil.  At least this would be a clean pipeline.
    The only solution for California is desalinization plants…or for Mother Nature to co-operate.
    Agreed on desalinization.  If Israel can do it, we can do it.
    Mother Nature doesn't need to cooperate.  She is doing what she does which is to work hard to restore the balance of nature.  That is why we have COVID and wildfires and hurricanes and floods, etc...  We are the ones who need to cooperate by lowering our reproduction rate and living lighter on this earth that sustains us. 
    And therein lies the crux of the situation.  Pipelines and desalinization are artificial solutions to human caused problems and until we learn to live in balance with nature, we will continue to have these problems.  But I still think the water pipeline is a good idea because until we do that, we need water- plain and simple. 

    And why are you so adverse to sharing in the first place?  The west grows more food than we consume.  Do you want us to stop sharing it?  What about the technology that comes from California?  Should we keep that to ourselves as well. 

    I’m in Canada, why would I want to share our most precious resource with the us.  Let’s get one thing straight, when US hospitals were dumping vaccines that were expired and your neighbour to North who could have used those vaccines and were begging for these vaccines your president said no..

    Life is a 2 way street…your country  couldn’t even share a life saving drug with their neighbours…

    The US is a country that is selfish and only cares about themselves anymore…
    You know they will take it by force, right? Who needs to share.

    I39m Gonna Get You GIFs  Tenor:lol:
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • OK about the water situation.

    California for YEARS has been piping in water from the mountains.  There is pipelines and reservoirs built already in place so yes, this has been done.

    California had a law where you were not permitted to use "grey water" for your lawn and garden.

    There was also a law forbidding a resident to harvest that water.

    Not sure if these laws were ever changed or not.

    Back to piping in the water.

    The Kern River gets water from the mountains.  LA gets water from the mountains.  If anyone has been to LA or Palmdale/Lancaster or the high desert/Jawbone canyon, or off the 405 in Santa Clarita the moving of water is very visible.  

    The only problem I can see about transferring water from east to west is getting holding areas for it.  Here in NY we don't have huge man made lakes or dry Washes to harness the water.  We rely on lakes and such.

    It still is an idea worth looking into further considering we will have more flooding it makes sense to have a place for the water to go.
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