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Multiple Fatalities After Truck Plows Through Wisconsin Holiday Parade

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  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 6,434
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dankind said:
    If the media is rarely mentioning on what a racist piece of shit this "alleged driver" guy is, how do you two (and a shload of other folks) seem to know all about it?

    Also, any journalist who wrote or spoke the words "white nationalist murderer" in relation to Kyle Rittenhouse should not have a job. Or at least would not have a job in any of the newsrooms I've been a part of (and I've worked in some real shitty ones :lol: ). I have a hard time believing that an actual journalist (and not just some dipshit talking head) wrote or said such a thing. 
    You seriously haven’t heard the media refer to Kyle as a white supremacist and a murderer? Even after the trial I still hear that.
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.mediaite.com/tv/msnbcs-cross-mystal-blast-white-supremacists-in-congress-celebrating-little-murderous-white-supremacist-rittenhouse-its-gross/amp/
    That's an opinion/talking heads show, not a news report.
    So is Tucker, Hannity and just about everyone else in the evenings but they’re taken as news sources.
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 23,196

     

    The Wisconsin parade suspect was accused of a car attack weeks ago. Here’s why he was out on bail.

    Bail set at $5 million for man accused of killing six at Wisconsin parade
    Waukesha County Court Commissioner Kevin M. Costello on Nov. 23 set bail at $5 million for the man suspected of killing six in a Wisconsin Christmas parade. (Reuters)
    Today at 6:30 a.m. EST

    The lengthy criminal record of the man accused of driving his SUV into a Christmas parade in Wisconsin — killing six people, one of them an 8-year-old — has prompted questions about why he was not in jail that day amid an ongoing debate over cash bail and broader criminal justice.

    Darrell E. Brooks Jr., 39, was taken into custody this week for the third time in less than two years. On Tuesday, Court Commissioner Kevin Costello agreed to a request from prosecutors in Waukesha, Wis., to impose $5 million cash bail, citing Brooks’s past violent offenses, pending cases, missed court appearances and other factors. He said the “extraordinarily high” amount of bail was warranted.

    “It’s an extraordinarily serious case with an extraordinary history with this gentleman of fleeing, of hurting people, of not following court orders, of not following criminal laws, not following just your societal norms,” Costello said.

    Why was Brooks not in jail on Sunday, the day of the Parade?

    In a case filed this month, Brooks, of Milwaukee, was accused of assaulting and then running over the mother of his child, sending her to the hospital. He was booked into the Milwaukee County jail on Nov. 3, and his cash bond was later set at $1,000.

    Brooks paid the bail on Nov. 11 but did not immediately go free. Instead, he was taken to the Waukesha County jail on Nov. 16, appeared in court over the phone in a paternity case and was released, officials said.

    During the hearing in the paternity case, court records show, Brooks said he had not made a payment because he had been incarcerated in Georgia. Records from the Waukesha County Sheriff’s Office show a string of similar warrants and paternity-related issues dating back years.

    Five days after he was released, authorities say, Brooks drove into the Waukesha parade. He was booked back into the Waukesha County jail the next day.

    Brooks has a criminal record that includes other charges and convictions spanning more than two decades — a list that includes allegations of battery, domestic abuse, recklessly endangering others and drug violations. He was also convicted of a sex crime in Nevada after impregnating a minor, officials say.

    In an ongoing case filed last year in Milwaukee, Brooks was accused of firing a shot at his nephew and another person after getting into a fight with the nephew. He has pleaded not guilty in both open cases in Milwaukee. An attorney representing him declined to comment this week.

    On Monday, the office of Milwaukee County’s longtime district attorney, John Chisholm, said that it had requested the $1,000 bail in Brooks’s case this month but that it now considers the amount “inappropriately low.” The office said it was reviewing the decision.

    “The bail recommendation in this case is not consistent with the approach of the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office toward matters involving violent crime, nor was it consistent with the risk assessment of the defendant prior to setting of bail,” Chisholm’s office said in a statement.

    Chisholm’s office did not respond to questions about who made the decision and whether any other bail recommendations were being reviewed.

    What kind of bail system does Wisconsin use, and how did it play out for Brooks?


    Wisconsin law requires courts to presume that defendants should be released without bail and to impose a monetary bond only if they believe it necessary to ensure that the person shows up to court.

    When new cases emerge, prosecutors review the details, sometimes conduct interviews and make bail recommendations, said Julius Kim, a former Milwaukee County assistant district attorney and a criminal defense lawyer.

    Judges and court commissioners, who are judge-like figures able to set bail and oversee hearings, do not have to follow those recommendations, said Kim, who spent seven years with the Milwaukee County district attorney’s office. But he said prosecutors’ suggestions typically receive a lot of deference.

    Courts also consider the nature of the charges, a defendant’s criminal history and other factors before agreeing to a bail amount, said Alexa Van Brunt, director of the MacArthur Justice Center Clinic at Northwestern University.

    Judges in Wisconsin can also impose nonmonetary conditions of release meant to protect community safety, including location monitoring or regular meetings with a pretrial officer. Some counties use tools that assess defendants’ risk of committing new crimes or of fleeing the area to inform their bail decisions.

    Edgar Lin, a Milwaukee-based defense attorney, said court records show that officials correctly identified Brooks as high-risk in early November because of the new allegations of violence against him and past instances of not showing up for court. But, Lin said, “there was an error” in the amount of bail that was set.

    Kim agreed that the bail sought for Brooks this month was low “given his entire background” and the new charges. He said that Chisholm’s office had been progressive in recognizing that certain cases did not require high bail, but that it still recommends higher bail for people accused of violent crimes. This case, he said, appeared to be an outlier.

    But Van Brunt, who litigates civil cases designed to promote changes to the criminal legal system, said the purpose of bail is not to detain defendants. If prosecutors believed Brooks was dangerous, she argued, they should have requested a pretrial detention hearing to present that case and see whether the court agrees.

    Ring camera shows Waukesha parade suspect's arrest
    Darrell E. Brooks Jr., the suspect accused of plowing through a parade in Waukesha, Wis., was captured in a Ring doorbell camera before his arrest on Nov. 21. (Daniel Rider / TMX)

    What’s the status of the national movement for bail changes?


    A growing movement questions the practice of requiring defendants to post monetary bail to ensure that they appear at their court hearings. A few states — including California, Illinois and New Jersey — and several other jurisdictions have limited or eradicated cash bail in recent years in response to concerns that the tool disproportionately keeps poor defendants and racial minorities imprisoned before trial.

    Many of those jurisdictions now use risk assessments to decide whether to detain defendants or release them without a monetary requirement. Those tools, which consider previous offenses and the defendant’s likelihood of being a flight risk, are themselves controversial: Some advocates have expressed concern that racial and socioeconomic biases are baked into them.

    Bail-change advocates argue that court systems should err on the side of releasing defendants, who are presumed innocent. Van Brunt said pretrial detention increases a person’s likelihood of committing another crime by stripping them of jobs, educational opportunities or custody of their children. Defendants who are held are more likely to plead guilty, even if they did not commit the offense, Van Brunt said, because they want to get out of jail.

    How may Brooks’s situation affect the bail debate?


    The conversation about bail in Wisconsin has centered on limiting cash bail, rather than eliminating it, said Nate Gilliam, director of organizing and policy analysis at the Milwaukee Freedom Fund, which advocates for ending pretrial detention and cash bail. Gilliam said he had not seen politicians using Brooks to argue against releasing more defendants before trial, but he said he expected the parade deaths to become a talking point in that debate.

    Other advocates said they also expect the incident, which they framed as an outlier, to slow or stop efforts to reduce detention.

    “Pointing to one incident is not reflective of what is happening on a systemic level,” Van Brunt said. “At a systemic level, when you get away from cash bond and do more evidence-based pretrial release, public safety is actually protected by that because people go back to their communities, they go back to their jobs, they go back to supporting their families.”

    Alice Crites and Kim Bellware contributed to this report.


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 18,800
    mace1229 said:
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dankind said:
    If the media is rarely mentioning on what a racist piece of shit this "alleged driver" guy is, how do you two (and a shload of other folks) seem to know all about it?

    Also, any journalist who wrote or spoke the words "white nationalist murderer" in relation to Kyle Rittenhouse should not have a job. Or at least would not have a job in any of the newsrooms I've been a part of (and I've worked in some real shitty ones :lol: ). I have a hard time believing that an actual journalist (and not just some dipshit talking head) wrote or said such a thing. 
    You seriously haven’t heard the media refer to Kyle as a white supremacist and a murderer? Even after the trial I still hear that.
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.mediaite.com/tv/msnbcs-cross-mystal-blast-white-supremacists-in-congress-celebrating-little-murderous-white-supremacist-rittenhouse-its-gross/amp/
    That's an opinion/talking heads show, not a news report.
    So is Tucker, Hannity and just about everyone else in the evenings but they’re taken as news sources.
    By imbeciles. 
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • nicknyr15nicknyr15 Posts: 4,975
    Wow. Someone actually set up a GoFundMe for this piece of shit? 
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 8,235
    Keeping lookig for both sides here. Anyone supporting what this guy did or trying to call it self defense? You guys are trying to make it sound like just because the non-news douche bags aren't berating this guy non-stop that the left is covering this up or hiding it. The difference is idiots on the right who aren't news sources are taken as the news so when non-news sources on the left are just as dumb, the right tries to claim samesies, only it isn't supported by the masses of liberals who actually have half a brain. It's not even comparable.

    The truth of the matter is a common sense liberal thinks both of them are pieces of shit while the conservative consensus is that Kyle should be rewarded with millions in defamation lawsuits, given a job in government and be celebrated for defending himself. It's gross. But yeah, all the same.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 8,235
    nicknyr15 said:
    Wow. Someone actually set up a GoFundMe for this piece of shit? 
    Wow, you're really going down some rabbit holes about this ass clown.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • nicknyr15nicknyr15 Posts: 4,975
    tbergs said:
    nicknyr15 said:
    Wow. Someone actually set up a GoFundMe for this piece of shit? 
    Wow, you're really going down some rabbit holes about this ass clown.
    Rabbit hole? It was news. 
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 6,434
    nicknyr15 said:
    tbergs said:
    nicknyr15 said:
    Wow. Someone actually set up a GoFundMe for this piece of shit? 
    Wow, you're really going down some rabbit holes about this ass clown.
    Rabbit hole? It was news. 
    It doesn’t surprise me, there’s enough creeps out there to support anyone. A mom in my kid’s class works in the correctional facility and told me James Holmes (Aurora movie shooter) gets tons of fan mail, mostly women.
    They took the GoFundMe page down before any donations were made. I wish they left it up they gave the money to the families, but that’s probably illegal.
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