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Capitol Riots 2

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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,278
    static111 said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    A noose is something I was taught never to make unless you were going to hang someone.  Never saw it as a race baiting tactic.

    Either way it is a knot that I yell at people for making if I see them doing it.
    Really?
    Pretty obvious allusion to the KKK and lynching in the south if you ask me.
    Yeah, not sure where you grew up but that was never ever a thing where I've been.  It had to be taught to me of all places, the news.  Same with the confederate flag.  Now I get how that is linked but not a noose.  

    You know how many westerns I watched as a kid and not lynching's?
    Well it wasn't a thing where I grew up either, it was just a part of US history that was taught in school.
    If that is what I was taught into thinking then everyone hung in a western was a lynching and racially motivated which of course they were not.

    I find it weird how people see a noose and think it's racist.  That's ridiculous.
    Just need to add a little inference, folks don't hang nooses from trees to remind people about John Wayne movies.
    Yes, that is fine.  I agree with that to a point.  There have been angry mobs that wanted to hang Pence though and other prominent white people in power so that is why I say it is silly.

    hedonist said:
    That particular noose hanging there screams racism to me. So does that image anywhere else (ie, it hanging empty). Typically sends “a message “.

    This I learned at a young age, I think from my father. 
    I see a cheap plastic piece of line in a tree, it's not even rope(the difference between rope and line was ingrained in to me by my captain).  It would look like a kid was playing with it.
    Weird that the mob trying to hang pence also supports and wants to uphold white supremacy at all costs including overthrowing democracy.  *im shocked*
    You're not shocked that a group of white supremacist's wanted to hang a supposed white supremacist?
    Speaking for myself, I was about as shocked at that as I was to see the "Blue Lives Matter" crowd beat & kill Capitol Police Officers, which was not shocked at all. 
    So you looked at the whole riot as just matter of fact?
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,345
    static111 said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    A noose is something I was taught never to make unless you were going to hang someone.  Never saw it as a race baiting tactic.

    Either way it is a knot that I yell at people for making if I see them doing it.
    Really?
    Pretty obvious allusion to the KKK and lynching in the south if you ask me.
    Yeah, not sure where you grew up but that was never ever a thing where I've been.  It had to be taught to me of all places, the news.  Same with the confederate flag.  Now I get how that is linked but not a noose.  

    You know how many westerns I watched as a kid and not lynching's?
    Well it wasn't a thing where I grew up either, it was just a part of US history that was taught in school.
    If that is what I was taught into thinking then everyone hung in a western was a lynching and racially motivated which of course they were not.

    I find it weird how people see a noose and think it's racist.  That's ridiculous.
    Just need to add a little inference, folks don't hang nooses from trees to remind people about John Wayne movies.
    Yes, that is fine.  I agree with that to a point.  There have been angry mobs that wanted to hang Pence though and other prominent white people in power so that is why I say it is silly.

    hedonist said:
    That particular noose hanging there screams racism to me. So does that image anywhere else (ie, it hanging empty). Typically sends “a message “.

    This I learned at a young age, I think from my father. 
    I see a cheap plastic piece of line in a tree, it's not even rope(the difference between rope and line was ingrained in to me by my captain).  It would look like a kid was playing with it.
    Weird that the mob trying to hang pence also supports and wants to uphold white supremacy at all costs including overthrowing democracy.  *im shocked*
    You're not shocked that a group of white supremacist's wanted to hang a supposed white supremacist?
    Speaking for myself, I was about as shocked at that as I was to see the "Blue Lives Matter" crowd beat & kill Capitol Police Officers, which was not shocked at all. 
    So you looked at the whole riot as just matter of fact?
    What do you mean? 

  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,278
    static111 said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    A noose is something I was taught never to make unless you were going to hang someone.  Never saw it as a race baiting tactic.

    Either way it is a knot that I yell at people for making if I see them doing it.
    Really?
    Pretty obvious allusion to the KKK and lynching in the south if you ask me.
    Yeah, not sure where you grew up but that was never ever a thing where I've been.  It had to be taught to me of all places, the news.  Same with the confederate flag.  Now I get how that is linked but not a noose.  

    You know how many westerns I watched as a kid and not lynching's?
    Well it wasn't a thing where I grew up either, it was just a part of US history that was taught in school.
    If that is what I was taught into thinking then everyone hung in a western was a lynching and racially motivated which of course they were not.

    I find it weird how people see a noose and think it's racist.  That's ridiculous.
    Just need to add a little inference, folks don't hang nooses from trees to remind people about John Wayne movies.
    Yes, that is fine.  I agree with that to a point.  There have been angry mobs that wanted to hang Pence though and other prominent white people in power so that is why I say it is silly.

    hedonist said:
    That particular noose hanging there screams racism to me. So does that image anywhere else (ie, it hanging empty). Typically sends “a message “.

    This I learned at a young age, I think from my father. 
    I see a cheap plastic piece of line in a tree, it's not even rope(the difference between rope and line was ingrained in to me by my captain).  It would look like a kid was playing with it.
    Weird that the mob trying to hang pence also supports and wants to uphold white supremacy at all costs including overthrowing democracy.  *im shocked*
    You're not shocked that a group of white supremacist's wanted to hang a supposed white supremacist?
    Speaking for myself, I was about as shocked at that as I was to see the "Blue Lives Matter" crowd beat & kill Capitol Police Officers, which was not shocked at all. 
    So you looked at the whole riot as just matter of fact?
    What do you mean? 
    If I read what you said right is that you weren't shocked that the mob wanted to hang pence or shocked that they beat the officers.
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,345
    static111 said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    A noose is something I was taught never to make unless you were going to hang someone.  Never saw it as a race baiting tactic.

    Either way it is a knot that I yell at people for making if I see them doing it.
    Really?
    Pretty obvious allusion to the KKK and lynching in the south if you ask me.
    Yeah, not sure where you grew up but that was never ever a thing where I've been.  It had to be taught to me of all places, the news.  Same with the confederate flag.  Now I get how that is linked but not a noose.  

    You know how many westerns I watched as a kid and not lynching's?
    Well it wasn't a thing where I grew up either, it was just a part of US history that was taught in school.
    If that is what I was taught into thinking then everyone hung in a western was a lynching and racially motivated which of course they were not.

    I find it weird how people see a noose and think it's racist.  That's ridiculous.
    Just need to add a little inference, folks don't hang nooses from trees to remind people about John Wayne movies.
    Yes, that is fine.  I agree with that to a point.  There have been angry mobs that wanted to hang Pence though and other prominent white people in power so that is why I say it is silly.

    hedonist said:
    That particular noose hanging there screams racism to me. So does that image anywhere else (ie, it hanging empty). Typically sends “a message “.

    This I learned at a young age, I think from my father. 
    I see a cheap plastic piece of line in a tree, it's not even rope(the difference between rope and line was ingrained in to me by my captain).  It would look like a kid was playing with it.
    Weird that the mob trying to hang pence also supports and wants to uphold white supremacy at all costs including overthrowing democracy.  *im shocked*
    You're not shocked that a group of white supremacist's wanted to hang a supposed white supremacist?
    Speaking for myself, I was about as shocked at that as I was to see the "Blue Lives Matter" crowd beat & kill Capitol Police Officers, which was not shocked at all. 
    So you looked at the whole riot as just matter of fact?
    What do you mean? 
    If I read what you said right is that you weren't shocked that the mob wanted to hang pence or shocked that they beat the officers.
    I'm not shocked that they wanted to hang Mike Pence. Trump sent his gullible supporters after him and they were more than happy to oblige. 

    I'm also not shocked that those trump supporters beat & killed police officers. 

    I've always believed "Blue Lives Matter" was really just code for "No, Black Lives Don't Matter" and the events of 1/6 did nothing to dispel that notion for me. 

  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 24,647
    static111 said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    A noose is something I was taught never to make unless you were going to hang someone.  Never saw it as a race baiting tactic.

    Either way it is a knot that I yell at people for making if I see them doing it.
    Really?
    Pretty obvious allusion to the KKK and lynching in the south if you ask me.
    Yeah, not sure where you grew up but that was never ever a thing where I've been.  It had to be taught to me of all places, the news.  Same with the confederate flag.  Now I get how that is linked but not a noose.  

    You know how many westerns I watched as a kid and not lynching's?
    Well it wasn't a thing where I grew up either, it was just a part of US history that was taught in school.
    If that is what I was taught into thinking then everyone hung in a western was a lynching and racially motivated which of course they were not.

    I find it weird how people see a noose and think it's racist.  That's ridiculous.
    Just need to add a little inference, folks don't hang nooses from trees to remind people about John Wayne movies.
    Yes, that is fine.  I agree with that to a point.  There have been angry mobs that wanted to hang Pence though and other prominent white people in power so that is why I say it is silly.

    hedonist said:
    That particular noose hanging there screams racism to me. So does that image anywhere else (ie, it hanging empty). Typically sends “a message “.

    This I learned at a young age, I think from my father. 
    I see a cheap plastic piece of line in a tree, it's not even rope(the difference between rope and line was ingrained in to me by my captain).  It would look like a kid was playing with it.
    Weird that the mob trying to hang pence also supports and wants to uphold white supremacy at all costs including overthrowing democracy.  *im shocked*
    You're not shocked that a group of white supremacist's wanted to hang a supposed white supremacist?
    Speaking for myself, I was about as shocked at that as I was to see the "Blue Lives Matter" crowd beat & kill Capitol Police Officers, which was not shocked at all. 
    So you looked at the whole riot as just matter of fact?
    What do you mean? 
    If I read what you said right is that you weren't shocked that the mob wanted to hang pence or shocked that they beat the officers.
    I'm not shocked that they wanted to hang Mike Pence. Trump sent his gullible supporters after him and they were more than happy to oblige. 

    I'm also not shocked that those trump supporters beat & killed police officers. 

    I've always believed "Blue Lives Matter" was really just code for "No, Black Lives Don't Matter" and the events of 1/6 did nothing to dispel that notion for me. 

    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 23,470
    static111 said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    A noose is something I was taught never to make unless you were going to hang someone.  Never saw it as a race baiting tactic.

    Either way it is a knot that I yell at people for making if I see them doing it.
    Really?
    Pretty obvious allusion to the KKK and lynching in the south if you ask me.
    Yeah, not sure where you grew up but that was never ever a thing where I've been.  It had to be taught to me of all places, the news.  Same with the confederate flag.  Now I get how that is linked but not a noose.  

    You know how many westerns I watched as a kid and not lynching's?
    Well it wasn't a thing where I grew up either, it was just a part of US history that was taught in school.
    If that is what I was taught into thinking then everyone hung in a western was a lynching and racially motivated which of course they were not.

    I find it weird how people see a noose and think it's racist.  That's ridiculous.
    Just need to add a little inference, folks don't hang nooses from trees to remind people about John Wayne movies.
    Yes, that is fine.  I agree with that to a point.  There have been angry mobs that wanted to hang Pence though and other prominent white people in power so that is why I say it is silly.

    hedonist said:
    That particular noose hanging there screams racism to me. So does that image anywhere else (ie, it hanging empty). Typically sends “a message “.

    This I learned at a young age, I think from my father. 
    I see a cheap plastic piece of line in a tree, it's not even rope(the difference between rope and line was ingrained in to me by my captain).  It would look like a kid was playing with it.
    Weird that the mob trying to hang pence also supports and wants to uphold white supremacy at all costs including overthrowing democracy.  *im shocked*
    You're not shocked that a group of white supremacist's wanted to hang a supposed white supremacist?
    Speaking for myself, I was about as shocked at that as I was to see the "Blue Lives Matter" crowd beat & kill Capitol Police Officers, which was not shocked at all. 
    So you looked at the whole riot as just matter of fact?
    What do you mean? 
    If I read what you said right is that you weren't shocked that the mob wanted to hang pence or shocked that they beat the officers.
    I'm not shocked that they wanted to hang Mike Pence. Trump sent his gullible supporters after him and they were more than happy to oblige. 

    I'm also not shocked that those trump supporters beat & killed police officers. 

    I've always believed "Blue Lives Matter" was really just code for "No, Black Lives Don't Matter" and the events of 1/6 did nothing to dispel that notion for me. 
    This.
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,345
    “Terry Fanone, mother of Capitol police officer Michael Fanone, who was badly injured in the January 6 attack on the Capitol, appeared on CNN Tonight With Don Lemon Monday where she responded to former President Donald Trump defending the insurrectionists in an interview on Fox News last week. Officer Fanone was dragged into the crowd by the violent mob where he was tased multiple times and beaten, suffering a heart attack and a concussion. He is still dealing with a traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress disorder.

    But Trump’s characterization of the crowd was in stark contrast to what Officer Fanone experienced. In an interview with Laura Ingraham, Trump claimed the rioters posed “zero threat,” and that they were “hugging and kissing the police.”

    https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/mother-injured-capitol-officer-calls-out-republicans-downplay-capitol-riot-how-dare-you-080347336.html



    lofuckinl @ “blue lives matter”. 


  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 20,765
    static111 said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    Poncier said:
    A noose is something I was taught never to make unless you were going to hang someone.  Never saw it as a race baiting tactic.

    Either way it is a knot that I yell at people for making if I see them doing it.
    Really?
    Pretty obvious allusion to the KKK and lynching in the south if you ask me.
    Yeah, not sure where you grew up but that was never ever a thing where I've been.  It had to be taught to me of all places, the news.  Same with the confederate flag.  Now I get how that is linked but not a noose.  

    You know how many westerns I watched as a kid and not lynching's?
    Well it wasn't a thing where I grew up either, it was just a part of US history that was taught in school.
    If that is what I was taught into thinking then everyone hung in a western was a lynching and racially motivated which of course they were not.

    I find it weird how people see a noose and think it's racist.  That's ridiculous.
    Just need to add a little inference, folks don't hang nooses from trees to remind people about John Wayne movies.
    Yes, that is fine.  I agree with that to a point.  There have been angry mobs that wanted to hang Pence though and other prominent white people in power so that is why I say it is silly.

    hedonist said:
    That particular noose hanging there screams racism to me. So does that image anywhere else (ie, it hanging empty). Typically sends “a message “.

    This I learned at a young age, I think from my father. 
    I see a cheap plastic piece of line in a tree, it's not even rope(the difference between rope and line was ingrained in to me by my captain).  It would look like a kid was playing with it.
    Weird that the mob trying to hang pence also supports and wants to uphold white supremacy at all costs including overthrowing democracy.  *im shocked*
    You're not shocked that a group of white supremacist's wanted to hang a supposed white supremacist?
    Speaking for myself, I was about as shocked at that as I was to see the "Blue Lives Matter" crowd beat & kill Capitol Police Officers, which was not shocked at all. 
    So you looked at the whole riot as just matter of fact?
    What do you mean? 
    If I read what you said right is that you weren't shocked that the mob wanted to hang pence or shocked that they beat the officers.
    Many of these idiots truly believed that they were saving the Republic and that people protecting Congress were traitors.  Nothing shocks me about mob behavior or the herd mentality of people.  Years ago I read a book called Hitler's Willing Executioners, which is about the ordinary Germans complicity in the war crimes, and how society arrived at that heinous point in history.  America is no immune to the same. 
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 17,396
    edited April 2
    Bump (no pun intended)
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,345
    https://www.boston.com/news/national-news/2021/04/02/capitol-police-say-driver-rammed-vehicle-into-2-officers


    Capitol's on lockdown at the moment. Someone drove a car into a couple of officers at a checkpoint. 


  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 20,765
    https://www.boston.com/news/national-news/2021/04/02/capitol-police-say-driver-rammed-vehicle-into-2-officers


    Capitol's on lockdown at the moment. Someone drove a car into a couple of officers at a checkpoint. 

    And he's dead.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 20,765
    Jesus, now one of the cops died.  WTF.
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,345
    Wtf 

  • tbergstbergs Posts: 7,777
    If it's not mass shootings it's carnage in other ways. Just lovely.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,345


  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 6,118
    edited April 3
    Why is this in the Capitol Hill Riots thread?  Just curious...The two do not appear to be related in the least.
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 24,647
    PJPOWER said:
    Why is this in the Capitol Hill Riots thread?  Just curious...The two do not appear to be related in the least.
    Capitol policeman dead I’d say it belongs. 
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 6,118
    edited April 3
    PJPOWER said:
    Why is this in the Capitol Hill Riots thread?  Just curious...The two do not appear to be related in the least.
    Capitol policeman dead I’d say it belongs. 
    It is not tied to the riots in the least, but whatever floats your boat and makes you feel “validated” I guess...

    “WASHINGTON — The man who police say rammed his car into a security barrier at the U.S. Capitol on Friday and was fatally shot by police after emerging from the vehicle with a knife was a lifelong athlete who in recent months had shown growing support on social media for Louis Farrakhan and the extremist Nation of Islam group.”
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/04/02/noah-green-went-from-football-player-posting-extremist-groups/7068100002/
    Post edited by PJPOWER on
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 20,765
    PJPOWER said:
    PJPOWER said:
    Why is this in the Capitol Hill Riots thread?  Just curious...The two do not appear to be related in the least.
    Capitol policeman dead I’d say it belongs. 
    It is not tied to the riots in the least, but whatever floats your boat and makes you feel “validated” I guess...

    “WASHINGTON — The man who police say rammed his car into a security barrier at the U.S. Capitol on Friday and was fatally shot by police after emerging from the vehicle with a knife was a lifelong athlete who in recent months had shown growing support on social media for Louis Farrakhan and the extremist Nation of Islam group.”
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/04/02/noah-green-went-from-football-player-posting-extremist-groups/7068100002/
    When it was posted here by Merkinballer, no one knew the details.  It was simply that there was an incident at the Capitol.  
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 24,647
    PJPOWER said:
    PJPOWER said:
    Why is this in the Capitol Hill Riots thread?  Just curious...The two do not appear to be related in the least.
    Capitol policeman dead I’d say it belongs. 
    It is not tied to the riots in the least, but whatever floats your boat and makes you feel “validated” I guess...

    “WASHINGTON — The man who police say rammed his car into a security barrier at the U.S. Capitol on Friday and was fatally shot by police after emerging from the vehicle with a knife was a lifelong athlete who in recent months had shown growing support on social media for Louis Farrakhan and the extremist Nation of Islam group.”
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/04/02/noah-green-went-from-football-player-posting-extremist-groups/7068100002/
    So go ahead and start a thread about policeman getting run over by crazed people! Where do you supposed this story should of been put on I’m sorry but a cop got run over at barricades that were put in place because of 1/6 insurrection 
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 24,647
    Or maybe that post can be moved over to Breaking news thread would that be ok with you..
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 6,118
    Or maybe that post can be moved over to Breaking news thread would that be ok with you..
    That would be a more appropriate place in my opinion.  I already posted it there...
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 24,647
    PJPOWER said:
    Or maybe that post can be moved over to Breaking news thread would that be ok with you..
    That would be a more appropriate place in my opinion.  I already posted it there...
    Yeah if fits better there!
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,345
    Paul Gosar’s own siblings want him held responsible for his role in the big lie & 1/6. 

    Why doesn’t the rest of America want him held accountable too? 


  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 8,599
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 20,576
     
    Protesters climb the US Capitol walls in Washington on Jan 6 2021 as hundreds of people in a pro-Trump mob breached the building Jason AndrewThe New York Times
    Protesters climb the U.S. Capitol walls in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021, as hundreds of people in a pro-Trump mob breached the building. (Jason Andrew/The New York Times)
    More

    When political scientist Robert Pape began studying the issues that motivated the estimated 380 people arrested in connection with the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, he expected to find that the rioters were driven to violence by the lingering effects of the 2008 Great Recession.

    Instead, he found something very different: Most of the people who took part in the assault, his polling and demographic data showed, came from places that were awash in fears that the rights of minorities and immigrants were crowding out the rights of white people in American politics and culture.

    If Pape’s initial conclusions — published Tuesday in The Washington Post — hold true, they would suggest that the Capitol attack has historical echoes reaching back to before the Civil War, he said in an interview over the weekend. In the shorter term, he said, the study would appear to connect Jan. 6 not only to the once-fringe right-wing theory called the Great Replacement, which holds that minorities and immigrants are seeking to take over the country, but also to events such as the 2017 far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, where crowds of white men marched with torches chanting, “Jews will not replace us!”

    Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York Times

    “If you look back in history, there has always been a series of far-right extremist movements responding to new waves of immigration to the United States or to movements for civil rights by minority groups,” Pape said. “You see a common pattern in the Capitol insurrectionists. They are mainly middle-class to upper-middle-class whites who are worried that, as social changes occur around them, they will see a decline in their status in the future.”

    One fact stood out in Pape’s study, conducted with the help of researchers at the Chicago Project on Security and Threats, a think tank that he runs at the University of Chicago. Counties with the most-significant declines in the non-Hispanic white population are the most likely to produce insurrectionists. This finding held true, Pape determined, even when controlling for population size, distance to Washington, unemployment rate, and urban or rural location.

    Law enforcement officials have said 800 to 1,000 people entered the Capitol on Jan. 6, and prosecutors have spent the past three months tracking down many of them in what they have described as one of the largest criminal investigations in American history. In recent court filings, the government has hinted that more than 400 people may ultimately face charges, including illegal entry, assault of police officers and the obstruction of the official business of Congress.

    In his study, Pape determined that only about 10% of those charged were members of established far-right organizations such as the Oath Keepers militia or the Proud Boys, a nationalist extremist group. But unlike other analysts who have made similar findings, Pape has argued that the remaining 90% of the “ordinary” rioters are part of a still-congealing mass movement on the right that has shown itself willing to put “violence at its core.”

    Other mass movements have emerged, he said, in response to large-scale cultural change. In the 1840s and ’50s, for example, the Know Nothing Party, a group of nativist Protestants, was formed in response to huge waves of largely Irish Catholic immigration to the country. After World War I, he said, the Ku Klux Klan experienced a revival prompted in part by the arrival of Italians and the first stirrings of the so-called Great Migration of Black Americans from the rural South to the industrialized North.

    In an effort to determine why the mob that formed Jan. 6 turned violent, Pape compared events that day with two previous pro-President Donald Trump rallies in Washington, on Nov. 14 and Dec. 12. While police records show some indications of street fighting after the first two gatherings, Pape said, the number of arrests were fewer and the charges less serious than on Jan. 6. The records also show that those arrested in November and December largely lived within an hour of Washington while most of those arrested in January came from considerably farther away.

    The difference at the rallies was Trump, Pape said. Trump promoted the Jan. 6 rally in advance, saying it would be “wild” and driving up attendance, Pape said. He then encouraged the mob to march on the Capitol in an effort to “show strength.”

    Pape said he worried that a similar mob could be summoned again by a leader like Trump. After all, he suggested, as the country continues moving toward becoming a majority-minority nation and right-wing media outlets continue to stoke fear about the Great Replacement, the racial and cultural anxieties that lay beneath the riot at the Capitol are not going away.

    “If all of this is really rooted in the politics of social change, then we have to realize that it’s not going to be solved — or solved alone — by law enforcement agencies,” Pape said. “This is political violence, not just ordinary criminal violence, and it is going to require both additional information and a strategic approach.”

    Pape, whose career had mostly been focused on international terrorism, used that approach after the 9/11 attacks when he created a database of suicide bombers from around the world. His research led to a remarkable discovery: Most of the bombers were secular, not religious, and had killed themselves not out of zealotry, but rather in response to military occupations.

    U.S. officials eventually used the findings to persuade some Sunnis in Iraq to break with their religious allies and join the United States in a nationalist movement known as the Anbar Awakening.

    Recalling his early work with suicide bombers, Pape suggested that the country’s understanding of what happened Jan. 6 was only starting to take shape, much like its understanding of international terrorism slowly grew after 9/11.

    “We really still are at the beginning stages,” he said.

    This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

    © 2021 The New York Times Company


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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,278
    Interesting article.

  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 24,647
    mickeyrat said:
     
    Protesters climb the US Capitol walls in Washington on Jan 6 2021 as hundreds of people in a pro-Trump mob breached the building Jason AndrewThe New York Times
    Protesters climb the U.S. Capitol walls in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021, as hundreds of people in a pro-Trump mob breached the building. (Jason Andrew/The New York Times)
    More

    When political scientist Robert Pape began studying the issues that motivated the estimated 380 people arrested in connection with the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, he expected to find that the rioters were driven to violence by the lingering effects of the 2008 Great Recession.

    Instead, he found something very different: Most of the people who took part in the assault, his polling and demographic data showed, came from places that were awash in fears that the rights of minorities and immigrants were crowding out the rights of white people in American politics and culture.

    If Pape’s initial conclusions — published Tuesday in The Washington Post — hold true, they would suggest that the Capitol attack has historical echoes reaching back to before the Civil War, he said in an interview over the weekend. In the shorter term, he said, the study would appear to connect Jan. 6 not only to the once-fringe right-wing theory called the Great Replacement, which holds that minorities and immigrants are seeking to take over the country, but also to events such as the 2017 far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, where crowds of white men marched with torches chanting, “Jews will not replace us!”

    Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York Times

    “If you look back in history, there has always been a series of far-right extremist movements responding to new waves of immigration to the United States or to movements for civil rights by minority groups,” Pape said. “You see a common pattern in the Capitol insurrectionists. They are mainly middle-class to upper-middle-class whites who are worried that, as social changes occur around them, they will see a decline in their status in the future.”

    One fact stood out in Pape’s study, conducted with the help of researchers at the Chicago Project on Security and Threats, a think tank that he runs at the University of Chicago. Counties with the most-significant declines in the non-Hispanic white population are the most likely to produce insurrectionists. This finding held true, Pape determined, even when controlling for population size, distance to Washington, unemployment rate, and urban or rural location.

    Law enforcement officials have said 800 to 1,000 people entered the Capitol on Jan. 6, and prosecutors have spent the past three months tracking down many of them in what they have described as one of the largest criminal investigations in American history. In recent court filings, the government has hinted that more than 400 people may ultimately face charges, including illegal entry, assault of police officers and the obstruction of the official business of Congress.

    In his study, Pape determined that only about 10% of those charged were members of established far-right organizations such as the Oath Keepers militia or the Proud Boys, a nationalist extremist group. But unlike other analysts who have made similar findings, Pape has argued that the remaining 90% of the “ordinary” rioters are part of a still-congealing mass movement on the right that has shown itself willing to put “violence at its core.”

    Other mass movements have emerged, he said, in response to large-scale cultural change. In the 1840s and ’50s, for example, the Know Nothing Party, a group of nativist Protestants, was formed in response to huge waves of largely Irish Catholic immigration to the country. After World War I, he said, the Ku Klux Klan experienced a revival prompted in part by the arrival of Italians and the first stirrings of the so-called Great Migration of Black Americans from the rural South to the industrialized North.

    In an effort to determine why the mob that formed Jan. 6 turned violent, Pape compared events that day with two previous pro-President Donald Trump rallies in Washington, on Nov. 14 and Dec. 12. While police records show some indications of street fighting after the first two gatherings, Pape said, the number of arrests were fewer and the charges less serious than on Jan. 6. The records also show that those arrested in November and December largely lived within an hour of Washington while most of those arrested in January came from considerably farther away.

    The difference at the rallies was Trump, Pape said. Trump promoted the Jan. 6 rally in advance, saying it would be “wild” and driving up attendance, Pape said. He then encouraged the mob to march on the Capitol in an effort to “show strength.”

    Pape said he worried that a similar mob could be summoned again by a leader like Trump. After all, he suggested, as the country continues moving toward becoming a majority-minority nation and right-wing media outlets continue to stoke fear about the Great Replacement, the racial and cultural anxieties that lay beneath the riot at the Capitol are not going away.

    “If all of this is really rooted in the politics of social change, then we have to realize that it’s not going to be solved — or solved alone — by law enforcement agencies,” Pape said. “This is political violence, not just ordinary criminal violence, and it is going to require both additional information and a strategic approach.”

    Pape, whose career had mostly been focused on international terrorism, used that approach after the 9/11 attacks when he created a database of suicide bombers from around the world. His research led to a remarkable discovery: Most of the bombers were secular, not religious, and had killed themselves not out of zealotry, but rather in response to military occupations.

    U.S. officials eventually used the findings to persuade some Sunnis in Iraq to break with their religious allies and join the United States in a nationalist movement known as the Anbar Awakening.

    Recalling his early work with suicide bombers, Pape suggested that the country’s understanding of what happened Jan. 6 was only starting to take shape, much like its understanding of international terrorism slowly grew after 9/11.

    “We really still are at the beginning stages,” he said.

    This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

    © 2021 The New York Times Company


    So these middle to upper middle class don’t want black or brown folks moving into their neighborhoods but are ok if they serve & clean and cook for them at their local restaurants or cut their lawns. Just don’t move next them 
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • nicknyr15nicknyr15 Posts: 4,300
    mickeyrat said:
     
    Protesters climb the US Capitol walls in Washington on Jan 6 2021 as hundreds of people in a pro-Trump mob breached the building Jason AndrewThe New York Times
    Protesters climb the U.S. Capitol walls in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021, as hundreds of people in a pro-Trump mob breached the building. (Jason Andrew/The New York Times)
    More

    When political scientist Robert Pape began studying the issues that motivated the estimated 380 people arrested in connection with the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, he expected to find that the rioters were driven to violence by the lingering effects of the 2008 Great Recession.

    Instead, he found something very different: Most of the people who took part in the assault, his polling and demographic data showed, came from places that were awash in fears that the rights of minorities and immigrants were crowding out the rights of white people in American politics and culture.

    If Pape’s initial conclusions — published Tuesday in The Washington Post — hold true, they would suggest that the Capitol attack has historical echoes reaching back to before the Civil War, he said in an interview over the weekend. In the shorter term, he said, the study would appear to connect Jan. 6 not only to the once-fringe right-wing theory called the Great Replacement, which holds that minorities and immigrants are seeking to take over the country, but also to events such as the 2017 far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, where crowds of white men marched with torches chanting, “Jews will not replace us!”

    Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York Times

    “If you look back in history, there has always been a series of far-right extremist movements responding to new waves of immigration to the United States or to movements for civil rights by minority groups,” Pape said. “You see a common pattern in the Capitol insurrectionists. They are mainly middle-class to upper-middle-class whites who are worried that, as social changes occur around them, they will see a decline in their status in the future.”

    One fact stood out in Pape’s study, conducted with the help of researchers at the Chicago Project on Security and Threats, a think tank that he runs at the University of Chicago. Counties with the most-significant declines in the non-Hispanic white population are the most likely to produce insurrectionists. This finding held true, Pape determined, even when controlling for population size, distance to Washington, unemployment rate, and urban or rural location.

    Law enforcement officials have said 800 to 1,000 people entered the Capitol on Jan. 6, and prosecutors have spent the past three months tracking down many of them in what they have described as one of the largest criminal investigations in American history. In recent court filings, the government has hinted that more than 400 people may ultimately face charges, including illegal entry, assault of police officers and the obstruction of the official business of Congress.

    In his study, Pape determined that only about 10% of those charged were members of established far-right organizations such as the Oath Keepers militia or the Proud Boys, a nationalist extremist group. But unlike other analysts who have made similar findings, Pape has argued that the remaining 90% of the “ordinary” rioters are part of a still-congealing mass movement on the right that has shown itself willing to put “violence at its core.”

    Other mass movements have emerged, he said, in response to large-scale cultural change. In the 1840s and ’50s, for example, the Know Nothing Party, a group of nativist Protestants, was formed in response to huge waves of largely Irish Catholic immigration to the country. After World War I, he said, the Ku Klux Klan experienced a revival prompted in part by the arrival of Italians and the first stirrings of the so-called Great Migration of Black Americans from the rural South to the industrialized North.

    In an effort to determine why the mob that formed Jan. 6 turned violent, Pape compared events that day with two previous pro-President Donald Trump rallies in Washington, on Nov. 14 and Dec. 12. While police records show some indications of street fighting after the first two gatherings, Pape said, the number of arrests were fewer and the charges less serious than on Jan. 6. The records also show that those arrested in November and December largely lived within an hour of Washington while most of those arrested in January came from considerably farther away.

    The difference at the rallies was Trump, Pape said. Trump promoted the Jan. 6 rally in advance, saying it would be “wild” and driving up attendance, Pape said. He then encouraged the mob to march on the Capitol in an effort to “show strength.”

    Pape said he worried that a similar mob could be summoned again by a leader like Trump. After all, he suggested, as the country continues moving toward becoming a majority-minority nation and right-wing media outlets continue to stoke fear about the Great Replacement, the racial and cultural anxieties that lay beneath the riot at the Capitol are not going away.

    “If all of this is really rooted in the politics of social change, then we have to realize that it’s not going to be solved — or solved alone — by law enforcement agencies,” Pape said. “This is political violence, not just ordinary criminal violence, and it is going to require both additional information and a strategic approach.”

    Pape, whose career had mostly been focused on international terrorism, used that approach after the 9/11 attacks when he created a database of suicide bombers from around the world. His research led to a remarkable discovery: Most of the bombers were secular, not religious, and had killed themselves not out of zealotry, but rather in response to military occupations.

    U.S. officials eventually used the findings to persuade some Sunnis in Iraq to break with their religious allies and join the United States in a nationalist movement known as the Anbar Awakening.

    Recalling his early work with suicide bombers, Pape suggested that the country’s understanding of what happened Jan. 6 was only starting to take shape, much like its understanding of international terrorism slowly grew after 9/11.

    “We really still are at the beginning stages,” he said.

    This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

    © 2021 The New York Times Company


    So these middle to upper middle class don’t want black or brown folks moving into their neighborhoods but are ok if they serve & clean and cook for them at their local restaurants or cut their lawns. Just don’t move next them 
    Exactly Jose! What’s so hard to understand about this? Losers. 
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