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  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 27,592
    the gop cannot afford to lose cheney. they are running out of reasonable people in positions in power.
    They don’t care, it’s POOTWH’s party now. Lock, stock and barrel. Faux, OAN, etc. are working.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • static111static111 Posts: 2,508
    mrussel1 said:
    Liz Cheney has more balls than the entire GOP male population  
    Truth.

    Did you all see where Trump is calling Biden's electino the "Big Lie" now?  He's trying to co-opt what everyone has called his lie.  That's deliberate since he knows it's sticking.  
    Kind of like the right coopting Black Lives Matter and turning it into blue lives matter.   The right has a long history of this.
  • static111static111 Posts: 2,508
    the gop cannot afford to lose cheney. they are running out of reasonable people in positions in power.
    They don’t care about reasonable people they just care  about power
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 17,571
    static111 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Liz Cheney has more balls than the entire GOP male population  
    Truth.

    Did you all see where Trump is calling Biden's electino the "Big Lie" now?  He's trying to co-opt what everyone has called his lie.  That's deliberate since he knows it's sticking.  
    Kind of like the right coopting Black Lives Matter and turning it into blue lives matter.   The right has a long history of this.
    Remember when “fake news” meant misinformation campaigns on Twitter, Facebook, etc.?
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 20,855
     
    Whose 'Big Lie'? Trump's proclamation a new GOP litmus test
    By JILL COLVIN and STEVE PEOPLES
    Today

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump and his supporters are intensifying efforts to shame — and potentially remove — members of their party who are seen as disloyal to the former president and his false claims that last year's election was stolen from him.

    On Capitol Hill, Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 Republican in the House, risks losing her leadership post amid her increasingly public dispute with Trump. In Utah, Sen. Mitt Romney, a rare Trump foe in the GOP, faced the indignity over the weekend of reminding a booing crowd that he was once their presidential standard-bearer. And in Texas, the only openly anti-Trump Republican in a crowded special election for a congressional seat finished a lowly 9th.

    Trump left office nearly four months ago with his reputation badly damaged after a mob of his supporters waged a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol to prevent the certification of election results. But the recent developments suggest a revival of his political fortunes in which those who refuse to go along with his falsehoods find themselves on the defensive.

    “It’s scary,” said Michael Wood, the Texas Republican congressional candidate who based his campaign on a vow to push the GOP past the “cult of personality” that is Trump. In the end, he garnered just 3% of the vote in Saturday’s special election, while two Trump supporters, including one he endorsed, will advance to a runoff.

    Trump's grip on the party may only tighten in coming days.

    Adding to his flurries of press releases, his powerful Facebook account could be reinstated this week if a quasi-independent oversight board rules in his favor. Meanwhile, Republicans in Virginia will decide whether to nominate a vocal Trump supporter for governor in one of the few marquee elections on the calendar this year.

    An important signal of the party's direction may come on Capitol Hill, where Cheney's future is in question.

    The Wyoming congresswoman, the most senior Republican to call for Trump's impeachment, has insisted that the party must reject the former president's lie that the election was somehow stolen. There is no evidence to support Trump's allegations of mass voter fraud, and numerous audits, Republican state election officials and Trump's own attorney general have said the election was fair.

    But Trump has stuck to his story and issued a “proclamation” Monday attempting to co-opt the language his foes use to brand his falsehoods.

    “The Fraudulent Presidential Election of 2020 will be, from this day forth, known as THE BIG LIE!” he wrote.

    Cheney, who has not ruled out a 2024 run herself, fired back.

    “The 2020 presidential election was not stolen. Anyone who claims it was is spreading THE BIG LIE, turning their back on the rule of law, and poisoning our democratic system,” she tweeted.

    Clearly she has no intention of scaling back her criticism, even as she faces the possibility of losing her leadership post.

    Cheney survived an earlier attempt to oust her from leadership, but it could be different this time. GOP leader Kevin McCarthy stood by her earlier this year, but he has declined to defend her from the latest round of attacks as he faces conservatives restive for her removal. That's a sign of McCarthy’s own calculations as he works to stay close to Trump while also trying to extend a wider tent to help his party win general elections.

    While the pro-Trump Republican voices on Capitol Hill far outweigh his party critics, the detractors should not be dismissed.

    In all, 10 House Republicans voted to impeach Trump for inspiring the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, and seven Senate Republicans voted to convict. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell voted to acquit Trump, but publicly chastised the former president and has privately encouraged the party to move on.

    It's a different calculation for rank-and-file members of Congress, particularly those representing heavily Republican areas, where roughly 8 in 10 party supporters typically approve of Trump. Among party activists and base voters, that number is thought to be much higher.

    It’s still too early to draw any definite conclusions about Trump’s success so far this year. Some Republican strategists privately suggest there are real signs that the former president’s strength with rank-and-file voters and elected officials has begun to wane.

    “He becomes less relevant with every passing day, but among those who still listen to him he’s more relevant than ever,” said veteran Republican pollster Frank Luntz. “He still matters. He’s going to matter for months and even years, but as time goes on he’ll matter less and less.”

    For now, the former reality TV celebrity seems to be enjoying the ride.

    “So nice to see RINO Mitt Romney booed off the stage at the Utah Republican State Convention,” Trump crowed in a series of celebratory statements Monday lauding the Texas results and criticism of Cheney and Romney. “RINO” means “Republican in Name Only.”

    In Utah over the weekend, a roomful of Republicans had rained boos down on Romney before trying unsuccessfully to censure him for backing Trump’s impeachment.

    “Show respect,” the crowd was reprimanded by the state party chair. Romney reminded them that he was a lifetime conservative and their presidential nominee in 2012 — and told them Republicans would only hurt themselves by attacking each other.

    “If we divide our party, we’re going to be a losing party,” he said.

    In Texas, losing congressional candidate Wood, a 34-year-old former Marine and two-time Purple Heart recipient, has commiserated with a handful of prominent anti-Trump Republicans, including Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., former Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, former Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Cheney, who had donated to Wood’s campaign and offered moral support.

    He said Monday there’s real urgency for anti-Trump Republicans to unify against him.

    “This can’t be just individuals pushing back. We’ve got to organize and show the public you can be a good Republican and not buy into all that BS,” Wood said. “This fight won’t be won with podcasts and op-eds.”

    Mike DuHaime, a top Republican strategist, said the party is still grappling with its identity post-Trump, but argued that it will be better positioned going forward if it includes conservatives like Cheney and Romney.

    “There are people who are playing to the base of the electorate, which is very passionate and believes the big lie about the election. And it’s enough to win a primary for Congress or Senate or governor, or even president, it seems." But, he warned, “If we stay focused on only that, it’s not going to be successful enough in the general election to win back the majority.”

    "We have to at some point put this behind us if we want to be successful in a general election.”

    ___

    Peoples reported from New York. Associated Press writer Lisa Mascaro contributed to this report.


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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 20,855
    this goes here too....

    May 3, 2021 (Monday)
     
    Since the January 6 insurrection, Democrats have called the Republican adherence to the idea that Biden did not win the 2020 election “the Big Lie.” This term refers to a propaganda technique associated with Nazi politician Joseph Goebbels (although it did not actually originate with him). It refers to a lie told to garner power, a lie that is so big, so monstrous, and so outrageous that people believe it because they cannot imagine someone lying about something so important.
     
    One of the hallmarks of the former president was his ability to turn any accusations against him into an attack on his opponents. True to form, this morning he set out to appropriate the term “the Big Lie” for his own. Rather than meaning his refusal to admit he lost the election, he wants to use the phrase to mean the opposite: that it refers to “The Fraudulent Presidential Election of 2020.”
     
    Trump’s insistence that he was robbed of the 2020 election is pure fantasy, designed at least in part to enable him to continue to raise money (as I’ve written about before), and certainly designed to whip up supporters to believe the Democrats are illegitimate. It has been the driving force behind voter suppression efforts in a number of Republican-dominated states, efforts that, in Florida, were so extreme they had Republican operatives contemplating carving out exceptions for elderly and military voters to make sure those traditionally Republican constituencies will not be hit by the new rules.
     
    The effort to stoke the Big Lie continues to the present day. The Republican-controlled Arizona senate has authorized a private company with deep ties to Trump and his Big Lie to perform yet another recount of the ballots cast in Maricopa County last year. The firm, Cyber Ninjas, has no experience doing such a recount and is running the process without bipartisan observation. The goal appears to be to “prove” that the 45,000 votes Biden won in the county in 2020 were fraudulent, bringing his win of the state into question to “prove” that Biden’s overall win was fraudulent. One of the people performing the recount is Anthony Kern, a former state representative who was part of the January 6 insurrection.
     
    Today’s incarnation of the Big Lie, though, appears to be an attempt of the former president to solidify his power over the remnants of the Republican Party leadership. According to a recent CNN poll, 70% of Republicans do not believe that Biden actually won the election, but a few leading holdouts, including Representative Liz Cheney (R-WY), refuse to follow the party line. For her troubles, Cheney is facing a move to push her out of her position as the conference chair of the House Republicans, the third most powerful spot in the House for her party.  
     
    As he has consolidated power over the Republican Party after leaving office, the former president has been less and less tolerant of those Republicans who have called out his refusal to recognize the legitimacy of President Joe Biden’s election for what it is: a dangerous attack on our democracy. But Cheney is not giving in. After Trump’s announcement this morning, she tweeted: “The 2020 presidential election was not stolen. Anyone who claims it was is spreading THE BIG LIE, turning their back on the rule of law, and poisoning our democratic system.”
     
    This fight is a proxy fight over whether Trump will win full control over the Republican Party. His loyalists have vowed to get rid of Cheney from her position in party leadership by the end of the month. An ally of House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) told Scott Wong and Mike Lillis of The Hill: “She’s a liability, and McCarthy’s as fed up as the rest of us that she is focused on the past rather than winning back the House.”
     
    But Cheney appears to have some key backing, including that of former president George W. Bush, who has recently said that if the party stands for “White Anglo-Saxon Protestantism, then it’s not going to win anything.” Cheney is speaking out and standing firm. In a speech today at the annual retreat for the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank, in Georgia, she said: "We can't embrace the notion the election is stolen. It's a poison in the bloodstream of our democracy…. We can't whitewash what happened on January 6 or perpetuate Trump's big lie. It is a threat to democracy. What he did on January 6 is a line that cannot be crossed."

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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 20,855

    Opinion: Elected Republicans are lying with open eyes. Their excuses are disgraceful.


    Image without a caption
    Opinion by
    Columnist
    May 3, 2021 at 4:35 p.m. EDT

    “Lord, Lord, how this world is given to lying!”

    — “Henry IV,” Part 1, Act 5

    For the activist base of the Republican Party, affirming that Donald Trump won the 2020 presidential contest has become a qualification for membership in good standing. For the party’s elected leaders, accepting the clear result of a fair election is to be a rogue Republican like the indomitable Rep. Liz Cheney (Wyo.) — a target for Trump’s anger, public censure and primary threats.

    Nothing about this is normal. The GOP is increasingly defined not by its shared beliefs, but by its shared delusions. To be a loyal Republican, one must be either a sucker or a liar. And because this defining falsehood is so obviously and laughably false, we can safely assume that most Republican leaders who embrace it fall into the second category. Knowingly repeating a lie — an act of immorality — is now the evidence of Republican fidelity.

    This kind of determined mendacity requires rolling out the big guns. Said the prophet Isaiah: “Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil.”

    Moral clarity against lying is sometimes made harder by our loose application of the term. When public figures disagree with you in their analyses of tax policy, or welfare spending or Social Security reform, they’re generally not lying. They’re disagreeing. When it’s revealed that someone was previously wrong about an issue — even on a grave matter of national security — it doesn’t mean he or she was lying all along. It means that person was wrong.

    “To preserve the meaning of words,” said Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.), “is the first responsibility of liberalism.” Precisely because principled disagreement is essential in a democracy, we can’t attribute every difference to deception. This form of false witness is a tool of polarization and a method of dehumanization.

    It’s important to keep perspective about the stakes of any given lie. There is reason the English language has so many words to describe the shades of culpability in a deception. You can equivocate, or dissemble, or palter, or mislead, or prevaricate, or fib, or perjure. There are mortal lies and venial lies, cruel lies and merciful lies. Context matters.

    Speaking of perjury, almost any GOP response to charges of deception will eventually include the words “Bill Clinton.” In a time of rampant whataboutism, Republicans often point out that Clinton was a spectacular liar defended by his party. What they fail to acknowledge is that many elected Democrats criticized his lying under oath, even as they opposed his impeachment. Clinton was not insisting his supporters share in his immorality to show their loyalty (though that might have had some appeal when it came to other human failures).

    The context for Trump’s lies has been particularly damning. When Trump falsely asserted that Barack Obama was born in Africa and thus illegitimate as president, it was permission for racism. When he claimed he saw Muslims in New Jersey celebrating on Sept. 11, 2001, it was a vicious lie to feed a prejudice.

    But the lie of a stolen election is the foundational falsehood of a political worldview. Believing it requires Trump’s followers to affirm the existence of a nationwide plot against him and his supporters — a plot led by ruthless Democrats and traitorous Republicans, and ignored or endorsed by useless courts and a complicit media. The claim’s plausibility is not the point. Does it really make sense that Attorney General William P. Barr, who found no evidence of election fraud that could have changed the result, was in on the plot? Were the conservative judges Trump appointed who dismissed his rubbish lawsuits really out to get him?

    Such considerations don’t seem to matter. In the 1930s and ’40s, was it plausible that the democratic leaders of Weimar Germany had stabbed their own country in the back and betrayed its people? Or that an international conspiracy of powerful Jews was controlling world events?

    Trump’s lie is not the moral equivalent of fascist propaganda. But it serves the same political function. A founding lie is intended to remove followers from the messy world of facts and evidence. It is designed to replace critical judgment with personal loyalty. It is supposed to encourage distrust of every source of social authority opposed to the leader’s shifting will.

    The people who accepted this political mythology and stormed the Capitol were not lying about their views. They seemed quite sincere. And who knows what Trump really thinks? When a congenital liar surrounds himself with sycophantic liars, he can easily lose radio contact with reality.

    No, it is the elected Republicans who are lying with open eyes, out of fear or cynicism, who have the most to atone for. With the health of U.S. democracy at stake, their excuses are disgraceful.

    Read more:


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 27,592
    mickeyrat said:

    Opinion: Elected Republicans are lying with open eyes. Their excuses are disgraceful.


    Image without a caption
    Opinion by
    Columnist
    May 3, 2021 at 4:35 p.m. EDT

    “Lord, Lord, how this world is given to lying!”

    — “Henry IV,” Part 1, Act 5

    For the activist base of the Republican Party, affirming that Donald Trump won the 2020 presidential contest has become a qualification for membership in good standing. For the party’s elected leaders, accepting the clear result of a fair election is to be a rogue Republican like the indomitable Rep. Liz Cheney (Wyo.) — a target for Trump’s anger, public censure and primary threats.

    Nothing about this is normal. The GOP is increasingly defined not by its shared beliefs, but by its shared delusions. To be a loyal Republican, one must be either a sucker or a liar. And because this defining falsehood is so obviously and laughably false, we can safely assume that most Republican leaders who embrace it fall into the second category. Knowingly repeating a lie — an act of immorality — is now the evidence of Republican fidelity.

    This kind of determined mendacity requires rolling out the big guns. Said the prophet Isaiah: “Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil.”

    Moral clarity against lying is sometimes made harder by our loose application of the term. When public figures disagree with you in their analyses of tax policy, or welfare spending or Social Security reform, they’re generally not lying. They’re disagreeing. When it’s revealed that someone was previously wrong about an issue — even on a grave matter of national security — it doesn’t mean he or she was lying all along. It means that person was wrong.

    “To preserve the meaning of words,” said Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.), “is the first responsibility of liberalism.” Precisely because principled disagreement is essential in a democracy, we can’t attribute every difference to deception. This form of false witness is a tool of polarization and a method of dehumanization.

    It’s important to keep perspective about the stakes of any given lie. There is reason the English language has so many words to describe the shades of culpability in a deception. You can equivocate, or dissemble, or palter, or mislead, or prevaricate, or fib, or perjure. There are mortal lies and venial lies, cruel lies and merciful lies. Context matters.

    Speaking of perjury, almost any GOP response to charges of deception will eventually include the words “Bill Clinton.” In a time of rampant whataboutism, Republicans often point out that Clinton was a spectacular liar defended by his party. What they fail to acknowledge is that many elected Democrats criticized his lying under oath, even as they opposed his impeachment. Clinton was not insisting his supporters share in his immorality to show their loyalty (though that might have had some appeal when it came to other human failures).

    The context for Trump’s lies has been particularly damning. When Trump falsely asserted that Barack Obama was born in Africa and thus illegitimate as president, it was permission for racism. When he claimed he saw Muslims in New Jersey celebrating on Sept. 11, 2001, it was a vicious lie to feed a prejudice.

    But the lie of a stolen election is the foundational falsehood of a political worldview. Believing it requires Trump’s followers to affirm the existence of a nationwide plot against him and his supporters — a plot led by ruthless Democrats and traitorous Republicans, and ignored or endorsed by useless courts and a complicit media. The claim’s plausibility is not the point. Does it really make sense that Attorney General William P. Barr, who found no evidence of election fraud that could have changed the result, was in on the plot? Were the conservative judges Trump appointed who dismissed his rubbish lawsuits really out to get him?

    Such considerations don’t seem to matter. In the 1930s and ’40s, was it plausible that the democratic leaders of Weimar Germany had stabbed their own country in the back and betrayed its people? Or that an international conspiracy of powerful Jews was controlling world events?

    Trump’s lie is not the moral equivalent of fascist propaganda. But it serves the same political function. A founding lie is intended to remove followers from the messy world of facts and evidence. It is designed to replace critical judgment with personal loyalty. It is supposed to encourage distrust of every source of social authority opposed to the leader’s shifting will.

    The people who accepted this political mythology and stormed the Capitol were not lying about their views. They seemed quite sincere. And who knows what Trump really thinks? When a congenital liar surrounds himself with sycophantic liars, he can easily lose radio contact with reality.

    No, it is the elected Republicans who are lying with open eyes, out of fear or cynicism, who have the most to atone for. With the health of U.S. democracy at stake, their excuses are disgraceful.

    Read more:


    And some think it can't happen here, that the Nazi references were foolish and misguided. Faux with Inshannity and Fucker Carlson, along with OANN, Newsmax, Sinclair, et. al. are driving the minions to have no basis in reality (Fairness Doctrine needs to be re-implemented). If you don't think a concentrated media effort doesn't have consequences, read up on Serbia and Rwanda. You're seeing the effects in 'Murica in the one off, isolated incidents of Asian hate crimes, Proud Boys, etc. etc. Just wait until the circus in Arizona starts to move around the country. Good fucking luck, you're going to need it. Oh, and another 2.5-3 million guns were sold in 'Murica PER MONTH. Shouldn't everyone have about at least 3 each by now?
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  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 21,138
    Tucker is the worst.  Now he's actively sewing distrust into the vaccine process.  But to what end?  Why?  It doesn't make sense.  Is it just pandering to an audience that is inclined to believe such a thing?
  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 27,592
    mrussel1 said:
    Tucker is the worst.  Now he's actively sewing distrust into the vaccine process.  But to what end?  Why?  It doesn't make sense.  Is it just pandering to an audience that is inclined to believe such a thing?
    Destabilizing the status quo, setting something up for failure to blame the "powers that be." Rile the masses, only one man can save you. Think about what Liz Cheney and Mitten's are saying versus the POOTWH adherents, afraid of being primaried. They've boxed themselves into a corner and its not going to end well. They sold their souls in 2016 and are reaping the blowback.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,504
    mrussel1 said:
    Tucker is the worst.  Now he's actively sewing distrust into the vaccine process.  But to what end?  Why?  It doesn't make sense.  Is it just pandering to an audience that is inclined to believe such a thing?
    The pandemic issues are great for the culture war which is great for ratings. 

  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 21,138
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,547
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,504
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 

  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,547
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 
    That makes sense. TY.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 21,138
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 
    Yes, which generates eyeballs on tv which generates revenue.  Take a look at this chart.  People that are happy and hopeful don't watch the damn news with the same intensity.  Check out this chart.  https://thehill.com/homenews/media/551210-tv-news-ratings-online-readership-plunge-during-bidens-first-100-days
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,547
    edited May 4
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 
    Yes, which generates eyeballs on tv which generates revenue.  Take a look at this chart.  People that are happy and hopeful don't watch the damn news with the same intensity.  Check out this chart.  https://thehill.com/homenews/media/551210-tv-news-ratings-online-readership-plunge-during-bidens-first-100-days
    I watch my local news and then 60 minutes on Sunday.  When in the car it's NPR or sports talk...

    EDIT:  We don't have FOX or msnbc nor CNN.  More and more people are dropping cable now too.  Would that have anything to do with dropping viewers?
    Post edited by tempo_n_groove on
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,504
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 
    Yes, which generates eyeballs on tv which generates revenue.  Take a look at this chart.  People that are happy and hopeful don't watch the damn news with the same intensity.  Check out this chart.  https://thehill.com/homenews/media/551210-tv-news-ratings-online-readership-plunge-during-bidens-first-100-days
    I watch my local news and then 60 minutes on Sunday.  When in the car it's NPR or sports talk...

    EDIT:  We don't have FOX or msnbc nor CNN.  More and more people are dropping cable now too.  Would that have anything to do with dropping viewers?
    Man... Boston sports talk radio is as bad as fox news.... I had to stop listening 5 or 6 years ago. 

  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,547
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 
    Yes, which generates eyeballs on tv which generates revenue.  Take a look at this chart.  People that are happy and hopeful don't watch the damn news with the same intensity.  Check out this chart.  https://thehill.com/homenews/media/551210-tv-news-ratings-online-readership-plunge-during-bidens-first-100-days
    I watch my local news and then 60 minutes on Sunday.  When in the car it's NPR or sports talk...

    EDIT:  We don't have FOX or msnbc nor CNN.  More and more people are dropping cable now too.  Would that have anything to do with dropping viewers?
    Man... Boston sports talk radio is as bad as fox news.... I had to stop listening 5 or 6 years ago. 
    NY isn't insufferable, I would prefer more all around sports talk but I do get some nuggets from it.

    I'm very happy that Mike Lupica is not on ESPN any more.  HE was insufferable...

    I do think that article is missing on viewership dropping for a bunch of other reasons too.  Biden isn't going to rock the boat either.  It won't ever be a case of "what did he say now?!?"
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 5,504
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 
    Yes, which generates eyeballs on tv which generates revenue.  Take a look at this chart.  People that are happy and hopeful don't watch the damn news with the same intensity.  Check out this chart.  https://thehill.com/homenews/media/551210-tv-news-ratings-online-readership-plunge-during-bidens-first-100-days
    I watch my local news and then 60 minutes on Sunday.  When in the car it's NPR or sports talk...

    EDIT:  We don't have FOX or msnbc nor CNN.  More and more people are dropping cable now too.  Would that have anything to do with dropping viewers?
    Man... Boston sports talk radio is as bad as fox news.... I had to stop listening 5 or 6 years ago. 
    I do think that article is missing on viewership dropping for a bunch of other reasons too.  Biden isn't going to rock the boat either.  It won't ever be a case of "what did he say now?!?"
    Agreed 100%.  

    People are already happier that they don't have to wake up every morning and wonder what stupid things were said by the president on twitter last night. 

    (I won't get any further into sports radio because you'll never shut me up... it's all but turned me off sports completely)

  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 21,138
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 
    Yes, which generates eyeballs on tv which generates revenue.  Take a look at this chart.  People that are happy and hopeful don't watch the damn news with the same intensity.  Check out this chart.  https://thehill.com/homenews/media/551210-tv-news-ratings-online-readership-plunge-during-bidens-first-100-days
    I watch my local news and then 60 minutes on Sunday.  When in the car it's NPR or sports talk...

    EDIT:  We don't have FOX or msnbc nor CNN.  More and more people are dropping cable now too.  Would that have anything to do with dropping viewers?
    No, not at that drop from January to now.  Cutting the cord is much less dramatic.  What you are seeing there are democrats no longer focusing on the news with Trump being gone.  Fox viewers are still outraged and will continue to be regardless of who controls gov't. 
  • Gern BlanstenGern Blansten Your Mom'sPosts: 11,582
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Agree with both of you.  The statement that they don't want the pandemic to end is dead on.  
    This boggles my mind and it isn't the first time I heard it but I have to ask, What does the right benefit if we don't go back to normal?  Is it a conflict that they want?  
    Continuing the culture war issues brought about from the pandemic is a great way to keep people outraged and thinking they're victimized by liberals, which IMO were 2 of the least complicated aspect of trump's success: conservative outrage and perceived victimhood. 
    Yes, which generates eyeballs on tv which generates revenue.  Take a look at this chart.  People that are happy and hopeful don't watch the damn news with the same intensity.  Check out this chart.  https://thehill.com/homenews/media/551210-tv-news-ratings-online-readership-plunge-during-bidens-first-100-days
    I watch my local news and then 60 minutes on Sunday.  When in the car it's NPR or sports talk...

    EDIT:  We don't have FOX or msnbc nor CNN.  More and more people are dropping cable now too.  Would that have anything to do with dropping viewers?
    No, not at that drop from January to now.  Cutting the cord is much less dramatic.  What you are seeing there are democrats no longer focusing on the news with Trump being gone.  Fox viewers are still outraged and will continue to be regardless of who controls gov't. 
    Agreed....I basically ignored Howard Stern for four years.  It's nice to listen without wondering what is going on in the White House.
    Remember the Thomas Nine!! (10/02/2018)

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    2020: Oakland1, Oakland2
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 20,855
    all about his own power....

    House GOP leader amps up pressure on Cheney over Trump barbs
    By ALAN FRAM and LISA MASCARO
    Today

    WASHINGTON (AP) — House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy stepped up pressure on No. 3 House Republican Liz Cheney on Tuesday, claiming rank-and-file concerns about “her ability to carry out her job” as she trades insults with former President Donald Trump.

    McCarthy's comments on the Fox News Channel underscored the continued, if not growing, grip that the former president has on the House GOP. They also spotlighted an increasingly open split between McCarthy and Cheney.

    Rather than standing by Cheney — as he did during a failed effort to oust her in February — McCarthy essentially planted himself in the camp of her pro-Trump critics. His positioning with her detractors and their increasingly outspoken attacks suggest her hold on her leadership job is in renewed peril.

    “I have heard from members concerned about her ability to carry out her job as conference chair, to carry out the message," said McCarthy, R-Calif. “We all need to be working as one if we’re able to win the majority. Remember, majorities are not given. They are earned.”

    McCarthy's remarks come with Republicans optimistic about their chances of winning back control of the House in the 2022 elections. The GOP believes it has a trove of issues to use against Democrats and wants the focus there, not on internal party rifts.

    But between now and next year’s elections, the GOP must resolve the power struggle between the party’s pro-Trump loyalists and those who believe he has damaged the party and country by repeatedly — and falsely — claiming that last November’s presidential election was stolen from him.

    The fight between Cheney and her critics stands as a microcosm of that battle. It also puts the GOP in the awkward position of seeking to oust its highest-ranking woman from her post at a time when the party is trying to erode Democrats’ decisive advantage among female voters.

    Asked about McCarthy's comments, Cheney spokesperson Jeremy Adler said in a written statement, "This is about whether the Republican Party is going to perpetuate lies about the 2020 election and attempt to whitewash what happened on Jan 6. Liz will not do that. That is the issue.”

    Further demonstrating the schism between the two GOP leaders, one top Republican congressional aide said McCarthy had weeks ago urged Cheney to stop talking about Trump, and her failure to do that has boosted frustration with her. McCarthy, who delivered a speech supporting her when House Republicans privately voted to keep her in February, will not do that this time, said the aide, who spoke on condition of anonymity to describe internal conversations.

    A vote on whether to remove Cheney could occur as early as next Wednesday, when House Republicans are next scheduled to meet. The House is not in session this week.

    Potential contenders to replace Cheney include Reps. Elise Stefanik of New York and Jackie Walorski of Indiana, the aide said.

    McCarthy was interviewed a day after Trump mounted a fresh offensive on his assertions. Numerous state and federal courts and local election officials have unearthed no evidence of widespread fraud in the 2020 voting,

    Trump critics have labeled his claims “The Big Lie,” and he issued a statement trying to claim that moniker himself.

    “The Fraudulent Presidential Election of 2020 will be, from this day forth, known as THE BIG LIE!” he wrote.

    But Cheney, R-Wyo., quickly fired back. She was among 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump for his role in encouraging the Jan. 6 attack by his supporters on the U.S. Capitol, and she used Twitter on Monday to respond to Trump.

    Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., the House Republican Conference chair, speaks with reporters following a GOP strategy session on Capitol Hill in Washington in April. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    “The 2020 presidential election was not stolen. Anyone who claims it was is spreading THE BIG LIE, turning their back on the rule of law, and poisoning our democratic system,” she wrote.

    In response to Cheney, Trump issued a fresh statement reiterating his desire to see her defeated by another Republican in next year’s Wyoming GOP primary and claiming that people in her state “never liked her much.”

    Underscoring the Republican rift, Cheney criticized Trump anew at a a donor event she attended over the weekend with the conservative American Enterprise Institute at Sea Island, Georgia, according to a person familiar with the situation and granted anonymity to discuss it.

    “We can’t embrace the notion the election is stolen. It’s a poison in the bloodstream of our democracy,” Cheney said, in comments first reported by CNN. “We can’t whitewash what happened on Jan. 6 or perpetuate Trump’s big lie. It is a threat to democracy. What he did on Jan. 6 is a line that cannot be crossed.”

    In another illustration of internal GOP tensions, Cheney and McCarthy have not appeared together at House Republican leadership news conferences for weeks.

    Republicans believe Democrats will be vulnerable over President Joe Biden’s handling of the huge numbers of migrants trying to cross the Southwest border and for not prompting pandemic-shuttered schools and businesses to reopen faster.

    In February, conservatives unhappy over Cheney's confrontations with Trump overwhelmingly lost a secret ballot vote of House Republicans aimed at ousting her from her leadership job, 145-61.

    But in recent weeks, Cheney's continued willingness to speak out against Trump has prompted fresh criticism of her. She is a daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney and like him is viewed as part of the GOP establishment, making her a natural target for the party's pro-Trump conservatives.

    McCarthy has told reporters that during the House GOP's closed-door February meeting that resulted in Cheney keeping her job, he had defended her.

    “People can have differences of opinion. That’s what you can have a discussion about. Liz has a right to vote her conscience,” McCarthy said then.

    However, McCarthy struck a completely different tone on Tuesday. He said GOP lawmakers are concerned about the party's messaging, which is part of the No. 3 leader's job.

    “What’s our best step forward, that we could all work together instead of attacking one another,” McCarthy said.


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • KatKat There's a lot to be said for nowhere.Posts: 4,480
    Kat said:
    And I'm not supposed to believe my own eyes and ears, just believe what I'm told. Is that Animal Farm-ish or some other book? It's so bizarre.
    1984.

    it is also gaslighting.
    It's been a reallllly long time since I've read those books and it felt like I wasn't remembering correctly. Thank you, Gimme. I need to read them again.
    Falling down,...not staying down
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,547
    Kat said:
    Kat said:
    And I'm not supposed to believe my own eyes and ears, just believe what I'm told. Is that Animal Farm-ish or some other book? It's so bizarre.
    1984.

    it is also gaslighting.
    It's been a reallllly long time since I've read those books and it felt like I wasn't remembering correctly. Thank you, Gimme. I need to read them again.
    My GF teaches them regularly and she tells me this all the time.
  • KatKat There's a lot to be said for nowhere.Posts: 4,480
    Kat said:
    Kat said:
    And I'm not supposed to believe my own eyes and ears, just believe what I'm told. Is that Animal Farm-ish or some other book? It's so bizarre.
    1984.

    it is also gaslighting.
    It's been a reallllly long time since I've read those books and it felt like I wasn't remembering correctly. Thank you, Gimme. I need to read them again.
    My GF teaches them regularly and she tells me this all the time.
    I remember at the time that it all sounded so impossible and crazy. I don't think that's true now. 
    Falling down,...not staying down
  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 27,592
    The party of “family values” folks. Remind me to skip Idaho.

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/05/us/idaho-legislator-accuser-identity-revealed/index.html
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

    "If you're looking down on someone, it better be to extend them a hand to lift them up."

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  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 27,592
    What little respect I had for Darth Cheney's daughter, I've lost. If any of them, Liz, Mittens, Susan, etc. had any spine, they'd switch parties and shove it up the WWF POOTWH's ass. Actions speak louder that words when it comes to "principles." Just wait until they start referring to liberals as "woke thugs."

    Damn those President Biden supporters for storming the Capitol, damn them.

    Because those ideals that your party believes in have worked out really well for the vast majority of 'Muricans by any basis of metric?

    Gee Liz, what solutions might your party bring to the table in the absence of POOTWH? Oh yea, none. Got it. Fuck her.

    Opinion: Liz Cheney: The GOP is at a turning point. History is watching us.

    Opinion by Liz Cheney
    May 5, 2021 at 5:05 p.m. EDT
    Add to list

    Liz Cheney, a Republican, represents Wyoming’s at-large congressional district in the U.S. House.

    In public statements again this week, former president Donald Trump has repeated his claims that the 2020 election was a fraud and was stolen. His message: I am still the rightful president, and President Biden is illegitimate. Trump repeats these words now with full knowledge that exactly this type of language provoked violence on Jan. 6. And, as the Justice Department and multiple federal judges have suggested, there is good reason to believe that Trump’s language can provoke violence again. Trump is seeking to unravel critical elements of our constitutional structure that make democracy work — confidence in the result of elections and the rule of law. No other American president has ever done this.

    The Republican Party is at a turning point, and Republicans must decide whether we are going to choose truth and fidelity to the Constitution. In the immediate wake of the violence of Jan. 6, almost all of us knew the gravity and the cause of what had just happened — we had witnessed it firsthand.

    House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy (Calif.) left no doubt in his public remarks. On the floor of the House on Jan. 13, McCarthy said: “The president bears responsibility for Wednesday’s attack on Congress by mob rioters. He should have immediately denounced the mob when he saw what was unfolding.” Now, McCarthy has changed his story.

    I am a conservative Republican, and the most conservative of conservative values is reverence for the rule of law. Each of us swears an oath before God to uphold our Constitution. The electoral college has spoken. More than 60 state and federal courts, including multiple Trump-appointed judges, have rejected the former president’s arguments, and refused to overturn election results. That is the rule of law; that is our constitutional system for resolving claims of election fraud.

    The question before us now is whether we will join Trump’s crusade to delegitimize and undo the legal outcome of the 2020 election, with all the consequences that might have. I have worked overseas in nations where changes in leadership come only with violence, where democracy takes hold only until the next violent upheaval. America is exceptional because our constitutional system guards against that. At the heart of our republic is a commitment to the peaceful transfer of power among political rivals in accordance with law. President Ronald Reagan described this as our American “miracle.”

    While embracing or ignoring Trump’s statements might seem attractive to some for fundraising and political purposes, that approach will do profound long-term damage to our party and our country. Trump has never expressed remorse or regret for the attack of Jan. 6 and now suggests that our elections, and our legal and constitutional system, cannot be trusted to do the will of the people. This is immensely harmful, especially as we now compete on the world stage against Communist China and its claims that democracy is a failed system.

    First, support the ongoing Justice Department criminal investigations of the Jan. 6 attack. Those investigations must be comprehensive and objective; neither the White House nor any member of Congress should interfere.

    Second, we must support a parallel bipartisan review by a commission with subpoena power to seek and find facts; it will describe for all Americans what happened. This is critical to defeat the misinformation and nonsense circulating in the press and on social media. No currently serving member of Congress — with an eye to the upcoming election cycle — should participate. We should appoint former officials, members of the judiciary and other prominent Americans who can be objective, just as we did after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The commission should be focused on the Jan. 6 attacks. The Black Lives Matter and antifa violence of last summer was illegal and reprehensible, but it is a different problem with a different solution.

    Finally, we Republicans need to stand for genuinely conservative principles, and steer away from the dangerous and anti-democratic Trump cult of personality. In our hearts, we are devoted to the American miracle. We believe in the rule of law, in limited government, in a strong national defense, and in prosperity and opportunity brought by low taxes and fiscally conservative policies.

    There is much at stake now, including the ridiculous wokeness of our political rivals, the irrational policies at the border and runaway spending that threatens a return to the catastrophic inflation of the 1970s. Reagan formed a broad coalition from across the political spectrum to return America to sanity, and we need to do the same now. We know how. But this will not happen if Republicans choose to abandon the rule of law and join Trump’s crusade to undermine the foundation of our democracy and reverse the legal outcome of the last election.

    History is watching. Our children are watching. We must be brave enough to defend the basic principles that underpin and protect our freedom and our democratic process. I am committed to doing that, no matter what the short-term political consequences might be.

    Opinion | Liz Cheney op-ed: The GOP is at a turning point. History is watching us. - The Washington Post


    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

    "If you're looking down on someone, it better be to extend them a hand to lift them up."

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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 20,855
    as with most everyything this party does. this shit needs called out and loudly

    Republicans promote pandemic relief they voted against
    By STEVE PEOPLES
    Today

    NEW YORK (AP) — Rep. Nicole Malliotakis, R-N.Y., said it pained her to vote against the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan.

    But in the weeks that followed, the first-term Republican issued a news release celebrating more than $3.7 million from the package that went to community health centers in her district as one of her “achievements.” She said she prided herself on “bringing federal funding to the district and back into the pockets of taxpayers.”

    Malliotakis is far from alone.

    Every Republican in Congress voted against the sweeping pandemic relief bill that President Joe Biden signed into law three months ago. But since the early spring votes, Republicans from New York and Indiana to Texas and Washington state have promoted elements of the legislation they fought to defeat.

    The Republicans' favorite provisions represent a tiny sliver of the massive law, which sent $1,400 checks to millions of Americans, extended unemployment benefits until September, increased the child tax credit, offered housing assistance for millions of low-income Americans and expanded health care coverage. Republicans tried to negotiate a smaller package, arguing that Biden's plan was too expensive and not focused enough on the nation’s health and economic crises.

    Democrats are promising to make the pandemic relief vote — and the Republican resistance to it — a central element in their political strategy moving into next year's midterm elections as they defend delicate House and Senate majorities. And there are early signs that Republicans may struggle to defend their opposition to the popular legislative package, which was designed to protect the nation's fragile economic recovery following the worst public health threat in a century.

    GOP lawmakers have been especially bullish about promoting the rescue plan's Restaurant Revitalization Fund, which devoted $28.6 billion to the struggling industry. Applications for the program opened this week.

    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., topped a group of at least eight Republicans who have encouraged constituents to apply in recent days. The others included Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Reps. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y.; Greg Pence, R-Ind.; Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash.; Beth Van Duyne, R-Texas; Troy Balderson, R-Ohio; and Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio.

    Full Coverage:
     

    “The Congresswoman is using her platform to inform her constituents of federal funds and resources available to them,” Stefanik spokesperson Karoline Leavitt said. “She did not claim to support the bill in the tweet, and her constituents deserve to know about federal programs they can apply for regardless of how she votes.”

    Wicker's office noted that he voted against the full package, but led efforts to ensure the restaurant relief was included.

    “Sen. Wicker co-authored the amendment that successfully added the Restaurant provision to the reconciliation bill. Why wouldn’t he want to encourage participation?” Wicker spokesman Phillip Waller said.

    The Independent Restaurant Coalition acknowledged the Republican's awkward position, but offered its thanks anyway.

    “Senator Wicker did not vote for the package (we wish all members did!), but his work on the RESTAURANTS Act from the beginning made the relief fund possible,” the industry group tweeted. “We are grateful for that work.”

    And White House spokesman Andrew Bates sarcastically expressed appreciation for the Republicans who have begun to tout elements of Biden’s stimulus.

    “The American people — majorities of Democrats, independents, and Republicans — have long been firmly unified behind the American Rescue Plan,” Bates said. “So it’s heartening to see Republicans in Congress reaching across the aisle to endorse it — even retroactively.”

    The politics of the Republican position are complicated.

    The GOP ultimately benefited politically after uniting against the massive economic stimulus package signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2009. Republicans scored massive gains in the House and Senate the following year. While the GOP is optimistic it will retake the House majority in 2022, it's far from clear whether the stimulus vote will help it get there.

    Polling suggests the Biden stimulus is overwhelmingly popular. Two in 3 voters have consistently supported the $1.9 trillion package in recent polling, while individual elements such as the $1,400 direct payments to individuals are even more popular.

    And just three months after the bill was signed into law, the Republican opposition has only begun to be tested.

    The Democratic National Committee has already launched “digital takeovers” of local news websites in Arizona, Georgia, Wisconsin, Nevada, New Hampshire, Florida, North Carolina and Pennsylvania to thank Democrats and highlight the Republican obstruction. The White House's political arm has also put up billboards in 20 states calling out Republicans and focused on the Republican opposition in training for Democratic officials.

    “Between now and next year’s midterm elections, we’re going to make sure every voter remembers how Republicans tried to stand in the way of this economic boom and our return to normalcy," said DNC spokesman Ammar Moussa. "And you can count on Democrats to call Republicans out for their hypocrisy when they try to tout the same programs they voted against.”

    Beyond funding for restaurants, Republicans have also touted millions of dollars in health care grants allocated to their districts in the latest stimulus plan.

    Rep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C., in late March pointed to millions of dollars in such grants on social media, saying he was “proud” to see the taxpayer dollars returning to his district. A spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.

    Rep. Alex Mooney, R-W.Va., issued a news release at roughly the same time to promote more than $41 million spread across 12 health care centers in his district.

    “I am glad that this funding has been secured," he said, neglecting to mention how it was secured.

    The four-term Republican congressman defended his decision to highlight the grants this week in a statement.

    “Despite what anyone claims, all money that is appropriated by Congress is derived from the taxpayer, not President Biden," Mooney said. “Taxpayers deserve to know how their money is being spent, especially as it affects their towns and communities.”

    Malliotakis, who took office in January, promoted more than $3.7 million in health care grants from the Biden stimulus among her achievements in a self-issued “First 100 Days Report Card.”

    "These grants were among the 9% of funds dedicated to COVID-19 relief that I was always in support of," Malliotakis said in a statement. “Regardless of any particular vote, I’m going to help individuals, small businesses and nonprofit organizations get funding they are entitled to."


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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 20,855
     
    Florida gov signs GOP voting law critics call 'un-American'
    By BOBBY CAINA CALVAN
    42 mins ago

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a major rewrite of Florida's elections law on Thursday, tightening rules around drop boxes and mail-in voting in the presidential battleground. Critics say the changes will make it harder for voters, particularly the elderly and people of color, to cast ballots.

    It's the latest victory in the nationwide push by Republicans to restrict access to the polls, which party leaders say is necessary to deter fraud. The campaign has been fueled by former President Donald Trump’s false claim that his reelection was stolen from him, an assertion widely repeated across the GOP. Florida's Republican legislators passed this law — without a single Democratic vote — even though they acknowledged there were no signs of fraud in the state, which Trump won handily in November.

    DeSantis, widely viewed as a potential presidential candidate, clearly saw the political advantage in fighting for what his party describes as “election integrity.” In an extraordinary move, he staged his bill-signing live on the Fox & Friends show, with no other media outlets allowed.

    The morning’s event apparently came as a surprise to FOX News Channel. The network said Thursday that it had booked DeSantis’ appearance on its program “as an interview and not as a live bill signing. Neither the network, nor the show, requested or mandated the event be exclusive to Fox News Media entities.”

    A spokesperson for the governor, Taryn Fenske, said later that the actual bill signing took place elsewhere, and that the event televised by FOX News was purely ceremonial, even if it was advertised as a bill signing.

    This new law restricts when ballot drop boxes can be used, and who can collect ballots — and how many. It mandates that drop boxes must be guarded, and available only when elections offices and early voting sites are open. To protect against “ballot harvesting,” an electoral Good Samaritan can only collect and return the ballots of immediate family, and no more than two from unrelated people.

    “Right now I have what we think is the strongest election integrity measures in the country,” the governor said as he signed it. “We're not going to let political operatives go and get satchels of votes and dump them in some drop box.”

    Elections supervisors across the state did not ask for the changes, warning that some of the new rules may prove cumbersome and expensive to implement. Voter advocates assailed the law as a blatant attempt to impede access to the polls so Republicans might retain an advantage.

    “The legislation has a deliberate and disproportionate impact on elderly voters, voters with disabilities, students and communities of color. It’s a despicable attempt by a one party ruled legislature to choose who can vote in our state and who cannot. It’s undemocratic, unconstitutional, and un-American,” said Patricia Brigham, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida.

    The league joined the Black Voters Matter Fund, the Florida Alliance for Retired Americans and others in assailing the new law in a federal lawsuit filed minutes after the signing. A separate federal suit filed in Tallahassee by the NAACP and Common Cause also says the law targets people who are Black, Latino or disabled.

    “For far too long, Florida’s lawmakers and elected officials have created a vast array of hurdles that have made it more difficult for these and other voters to make their voices heard,” these groups said.

    Democratic Rep. Charlie Crist, a former Florida governor who announced his challenge of DeSantis this week, tweeted, “This is the difference between @GovRonDeSantis and me. He locks out the public and caters to FOX News. When I was Governor, everyone was invited in — Democrats, Republicans, and Independents. And when I’m Governor again, this will be a Florida for all.”

    Democrats acknowledge that the Florida law doesn't appear to be as draconian as one one recently approved in Georgia, a flashpoint in this national debate. But both laws contain some similar provisions.

    In addition to similar drop box rules, the Florida law also extends a no-influence zone to 150 feet (50 meters) from 100 feet around polling places, which could prevent people from supplying food and water to people waiting in line. And elections officials would have to let candidates and other observers witness some key election night moments in the ballot-handling process. Any violations could prompt hefty fines of up to $25,000.

    The Florida law also requires that a voter changing registration data provide an identifying number, possibly a driver’s license number or a partial Social Security Number, which advocates say could add a layer of inconvenience and keep people from being able to vote.

    The new law also requires voters who want an absentee ballot to apply for one every election cycle. Republicans had initially proposed making this retroactive, which would have immediately erased the Democratic advantage, but they backed off that move in the final version.

    Other more severe provisions put forward by some Republicans — such as banning drop boxes outright and preventing the use of the U.S. Postal Service for returning completed ballots — also didn't make it into the law.

    Over the years, Democrats and other voter rights groups have sought to simplify the ritual of voting, including automatic voter registration when applying for a driver's license. More recently, they have advocated for automatic access to voting by mail. Concerned that the pandemic would keep people from voting, Democrats urged people to vote early and through the mail last year, even as Trump questioned mail-in balloting.

    The result: a record 4.9 million Floridians voted by mail in 2020, and Democrats outvoted Republicans by mail for the first time in years, marking a 680,000-ballot advantage. The new law seeks to erase that.


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