California to ban suspensions for disruptive students

2

Comments

  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 17,040
    edited September 6
    brianlux said:
    rgambs said:
    Did anyone actually read the article, or just the titles?

    Teachers retain the ability to suspend for disruptive behavior and they are encouraging alternate discipline and behavior modification techniques.  When implemented by LA Unified School District suspensions went down and graduation rates went up. 
    Yes, I read the article.  Yes, on paper, teachers retain the right to suspend for up to two days.  But the real issue here is the intent of the bill.  The intent is toward further leniency with disruptive students, further "no child will fail" bullshit., and further cutting slack for parents doing a shitty, irresponsible and inattentive job of raising there little parent-made monsters.  Screwed up kids do fail and the fault is almost always with the parents but some ditzy lawmakers want it to become someone other than the parents problem.  The cascade of problems that follow this line of thinking increases every time some dumbshit clueless administrators and lawmakers come up with this kind of nonsense.  I feel bad as hell for the teachers that have to put up this this nonsense.
    Agree - some of us are/were trying to raise someone else's fucked up kids and having pretty much zero support from the school system made this so much tougher than it had to be.
    Post edited by F Me In The Brain on
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • dignindignin Posts: 7,400
    It's harder to cast kids aside, and they are showing better results with kids graduating. Results driven and it sounds like a win to me.

  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 14,153
    dignin said:
    It's harder to cast kids aside, and they are showing better results with kids graduating. Results driven and it sounds like a win to me.

    According to one of the bill's co-sponsors, so, yeah, I'm just going to go right ahead and take that at face value.

    And even if that's the case, a high school diploma is worth about what I just flushed down the toilet at work. Show me some third-party hard evidence of these kids getting accepted into postsecondary institutions and/or internships/work-study programs, and then I'll consider it a bill worth passing. I'd add that educators should get mandatory recurring training sessions on how to navigate the new system and that the state should pay for it since the state is making the legislation. 
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,011
    dignin said:
    It's harder to cast kids aside, and they are showing better results with kids graduating. Results driven and it sounds like a win to me.

    They pass these kids through the system now.  It's just easier that way and "look at the charts!  It's working!"

    I have many friends in alternative teaching and many a teacher is told to pass them through.

    True story.
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 14,153
    dignin said:
    It's harder to cast kids aside, and they are showing better results with kids graduating. Results driven and it sounds like a win to me.

    They pass these kids through the system now.  It's just easier that way and "look at the charts!  It's working!"

    I have many friends in alternative teaching and many a teacher is told to pass them through.

    True story.
    Haha. And it doesn't stop there.

    I have a buddy who taught at an Ivy League university. He had this real dolt in class, the first (and only) student he ever gave an F to on an assignment. Shortly after that F, my buddy was called to the carpet and had to defend his grading. The student was the grandkid of the billionaire whose name was on the university's library; the student should receive no grade lower than a C minus going forward.

    Things are half-assed all over.
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 17,040
    dankind said:
    dignin said:
    It's harder to cast kids aside, and they are showing better results with kids graduating. Results driven and it sounds like a win to me.

    They pass these kids through the system now.  It's just easier that way and "look at the charts!  It's working!"

    I have many friends in alternative teaching and many a teacher is told to pass them through.

    True story.
    Haha. And it doesn't stop there.

    I have a buddy who taught at an Ivy League university. He had this real dolt in class, the first (and only) student he ever gave an F to on an assignment. Shortly after that F, my buddy was called to the carpet and had to defend his grading. The student was the grandkid of the billionaire whose name was on the university's library; the student should receive no grade lower than a C minus going forward.

    Things are half-assed all over.

    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 3,592
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,011
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 18,897
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    Headstones Fan Boy
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 14,153
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    A kindergartner in my son's class last year threatened to bring in his dad's gun and shoot the teacher. He got a very stern "well, that's not very nice" from the principal. :weary:
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 19,890
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    A kindergartner in my son's class last year threatened to bring in his dad's gun and shoot the teacher. He got a very stern "well, that's not very nice" from the principal. :weary:
    Move to new jersey!  we just passed Massachusetts to become the countries best public school system.  
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 17,040
    mcgruff10 said:
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    A kindergartner in my son's class last year threatened to bring in his dad's gun and shoot the teacher. He got a very stern "well, that's not very nice" from the principal. :weary:
    Move to new jersey!  we just passed Massachusetts to become the countries best public school system.  
    Was the error in jest?
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 18,897
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    A kindergartner in my son's class last year threatened to bring in his dad's gun and shoot the teacher. He got a very stern "well, that's not very nice" from the principal. :weary:
    and that should honestly be treated as a potential threat. kindergartner or not, I don't care. those parents need a visit from a social worker or the cops. 
    Headstones Fan Boy
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 14,153
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    A kindergartner in my son's class last year threatened to bring in his dad's gun and shoot the teacher. He got a very stern "well, that's not very nice" from the principal. :weary:
    and that should honestly be treated as a potential threat. kindergartner or not, I don't care. those parents need a visit from a social worker or the cops. 
    The dad has the Hitler haircut that all the Proud Boy types wear these days, and the mom is perpetually pregnant with other little angels.
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 18,897
    dankind said:
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    A kindergartner in my son's class last year threatened to bring in his dad's gun and shoot the teacher. He got a very stern "well, that's not very nice" from the principal. :weary:
    and that should honestly be treated as a potential threat. kindergartner or not, I don't care. those parents need a visit from a social worker or the cops. 
    The dad has the Hitler haircut that all the Proud Boy types wear these days, and the mom is perpetually pregnant with other little angels.
    ugh
    Headstones Fan Boy
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 19,890
    mcgruff10 said:
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    A kindergartner in my son's class last year threatened to bring in his dad's gun and shoot the teacher. He got a very stern "well, that's not very nice" from the principal. :weary:
    Move to new jersey!  we just passed Massachusetts to become the countries best public school system.  
    Was the error in jest?
    Nope.  Typing on my damn iPhone while waiting for the kids at the bus stop.  
    Are you happy with the public school in Cherry Hill?
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 17,040
    edited September 6
    mcgruff10 said:
    mcgruff10 said:
    dankind said:
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    I think crimes/potential crimes against a person would be held in a different regard than just some kid yelling/carrying on in class. 
    A kindergartner in my son's class last year threatened to bring in his dad's gun and shoot the teacher. He got a very stern "well, that's not very nice" from the principal. :weary:
    Move to new jersey!  we just passed Massachusetts to become the countries best public school system.  
    Was the error in jest?
    Nope.  Typing on my damn iPhone while waiting for the kids at the bus stop.  
    Are you happy with the public school in Cherry Hill?
    Not especially.  I think the schools in this city are better than many, worse than others.
    12 elementary schools, then 3 middle schools, then 2 high schools.

    When we first moved back here to help with our nephew the 2nd month of working with the district saw us start to bring lawyers to the meetings.
    Funny how we got what they originally agreed to provide for services all along, very promptly.

    The parents on the East side are a bunch of "my kid is perfect" dumb-dumbs.  Rich, but out of touch.  The school administration lives in fear of the parents crying foul if little Johnny gets a C, or so it seems.  Spoiled brats.  We fully supported discipline and truth.  I would guess every parent says that -- but the ones we speak to are very unrealistic about kids, and especially their little angels.  Pfffhhhttt.

    That stated, if you are lucky enough to have a bright and motivated kid, there are a zillion ways for them to excel.
    The ones who are typical teens?  Think that may be a different story.

    I feel badly for the teachers, although they make pretty amazing salaries, for teachers.  Always hear how poorly that teachers are paid?  Not in this town!
    (Hope it is the same where you are.)
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 19,890
    I see in-school suspension as basically classroom with all involved.  So not isolated per se.  But a place to go, to work quietly and independently. 
    I am a big fan of in school suspension over out of school suspension (depending on the violation).  Saturday detentions in our district seem to be very effective.  Four hours of sitting in silence, 8-12, no cell phones, no computer, just a book.  There aren't too many repeat offenders.  
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 18,897
    mcgruff10 said:
    I see in-school suspension as basically classroom with all involved.  So not isolated per se.  But a place to go, to work quietly and independently. 
    I am a big fan of in school suspension over out of school suspension (depending on the violation).  Saturday detentions in our district seem to be very effective.  Four hours of sitting in silence, 8-12, no cell phones, no computer, just a book.  There aren't too many repeat offenders.  
    BREAKFAST CLUB!!!
    Headstones Fan Boy
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 14,153
    mcgruff10 said:
    I see in-school suspension as basically classroom with all involved.  So not isolated per se.  But a place to go, to work quietly and independently. 
    I am a big fan of in school suspension over out of school suspension (depending on the violation).  Saturday detentions in our district seem to be very effective.  Four hours of sitting in silence, 8-12, no cell phones, no computer, just a book.  There aren't too many repeat offenders.  
    The first time I read the Bible was one of my stints in ISS. The teacher in charge of ISS was always reading it, so I decided to give it a go.

    Neat book. Narrative is all over the fucking place, though. Eziekel was a fucking character, man, eating scrolls and shit. Esther was also pretty cool; Vashti got a bum rush.

    Also, if my memory serves me well, only one dude claimed Jesus was resurrected, yet that’s the story everyone has chosen to believe in for a couple thousand years? Strange. 
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 19,890
    dankind said:
    mcgruff10 said:
    I see in-school suspension as basically classroom with all involved.  So not isolated per se.  But a place to go, to work quietly and independently. 
    I am a big fan of in school suspension over out of school suspension (depending on the violation).  Saturday detentions in our district seem to be very effective.  Four hours of sitting in silence, 8-12, no cell phones, no computer, just a book.  There aren't too many repeat offenders.  
    The first time I read the Bible was one of my stints in ISS. The teacher in charge of ISS was always reading it, so I decided to give it a go.

    Neat book. Narrative is all over the fucking place, though. Eziekel was a fucking character, man, eating scrolls and shit. Esther was also pretty cool; Vashti got a bum rush.

    Also, if my memory serves me well, only one dude claimed Jesus was resurrected, yet that’s the story everyone has chosen to believe in for a couple thousand years? Strange. 
    Damn you were a derelict.  
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 3,592
    mace1229 said:
    dignin said:
    mace1229 said:
    You think this is fake outrage? Why?
    Have you stepped into an inner-city school? Do you know what goes on there?
    Maybe this could have been in the California thread, but in my opinion most of the country is heading this way. And is a sign of how bad our education system is. To me that is very important, who would fake outrage over what is being tolerated in schools today?
    La, Chicago, Denver, Baltimore and many more cities are suffering from the same problem. And instead of dealing with it, they just turn away.
    Teachers can still suspend students. 
    I can tell you from experience that it will become very difficult for that teacher to suspend that student for 2 class periods. Most schools will not support that teacher's right.
    I have seen behavior that would warrant a full suspension, and when the kid gets sent to the office he gets escorted by back by a counselor who apologizes on the student's behalf and says he's ready to be back in the classroom. Kid never said a word, never changed behavior, and was gone maybe 10 minutes. Lesson learned from the kid and everyone else who witnessed it is I can do whatever I want and the office doesn't care. And they are right. When you send the message you don't want to suspend students, that is how they handle behavior in the classroom. I've seen it with many other teachers and I've seen it in my own classroom.
    This is a drastic change from the bullying outcry from 10 years ago.  You got in a fight or bullied and you were suspended immediately.  Does it hold different for violent acts or do they not get punished either?  Does the kid plotting to shoot up his school get a stern talking to and let back in to class or does he/she actually have consequences for doing these things?
    This is only for defiance/disruptive behavior. As easy as schools are on disruptive behavior, any hint of violence they are suspended pretty easily. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,299
    I just had a great idea.  Let's tell the parents this:

    "OK, here's the deal- you don't want us to suspend your kids when they disrupt the class and make the teacher's job miserable.  So here's what we'll do- instead of suspending the kids for x number of days, we'll keep them and send you a prisoner for x number of days.  That way, you get to see what might become of your kids if you keep fucking up your parenting.  Deal?  Deal."

    What do think?  Too much?
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • jeffbrjeffbr SeattlePosts: 6,643
    Great idea, Brian! I like it!
    But seriously, kids need to learn and understand boundaries. Kids also need to understand that every action has a consequence (good or bad). Removing accountability and consequence will leave these kids ill prepared for real life. I'm not looking for for corporal punishment, or crazy nuns smacking kids with rulers, but there needs to be an expectation of behavior while at school, and well defined and followed consequences for not behaving. Ain't life a bitch?
    "I'll use the magic word - let's just shut the fuck up, please." EV, 04/13/08
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,299
    jeffbr said:
    Great idea, Brian! I like it!
    But seriously, kids need to learn and understand boundaries. Kids also need to understand that every action has a consequence (good or bad). Removing accountability and consequence will leave these kids ill prepared for real life. I'm not looking for for corporal punishment, or crazy nuns smacking kids with rulers, but there needs to be an expectation of behavior while at school, and well defined and followed consequences for not behaving. Ain't life a bitch?
    Right on, Jeff and yes, it is!

    My wife liked the idea but thought it was a bit much.  She suggested that if kids can't be suspended, then the parent must come in and sit with the kid in the corner of the room and make sure he or she stays there.  Also not a bad idea.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 3,592
    brianlux said:
    I just had a great idea.  Let's tell the parents this:

    "OK, here's the deal- you don't want us to suspend your kids when they disrupt the class and make the teacher's job miserable.  So here's what we'll do- instead of suspending the kids for x number of days, we'll keep them and send you a prisoner for x number of days.  That way, you get to see what might become of your kids if you keep fucking up your parenting.  Deal?  Deal."

    What do think?  Too much?
    To be fair I don’t hear parents complain about it hardly at all. It’s the politicians, school board and civil rights organizations that cause all the fuss.
    i have a handful of really challenging kids right now, the parents are either uninvolved or don’t care, or totally support consequences. But the school is afraid to enforce anything because of big organizations.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,299
    mace1229 said:
    brianlux said:
    I just had a great idea.  Let's tell the parents this:

    "OK, here's the deal- you don't want us to suspend your kids when they disrupt the class and make the teacher's job miserable.  So here's what we'll do- instead of suspending the kids for x number of days, we'll keep them and send you a prisoner for x number of days.  That way, you get to see what might become of your kids if you keep fucking up your parenting.  Deal?  Deal."

    What do think?  Too much?
    To be fair I don’t hear parents complain about it hardly at all. It’s the politicians, school board and civil rights organizations that cause all the fuss.
    i have a handful of really challenging kids right now, the parents are either uninvolved or don’t care, or totally support consequences. But the school is afraid to enforce anything because of big organizations.
    "Parents uninvolved or don't care", as you  say, is a big part of it.  But how the hell do we get parents to care?  It's a vicious cycle.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 3,592
    brianlux said:
    mace1229 said:
    brianlux said:
    I just had a great idea.  Let's tell the parents this:

    "OK, here's the deal- you don't want us to suspend your kids when they disrupt the class and make the teacher's job miserable.  So here's what we'll do- instead of suspending the kids for x number of days, we'll keep them and send you a prisoner for x number of days.  That way, you get to see what might become of your kids if you keep fucking up your parenting.  Deal?  Deal."

    What do think?  Too much?
    To be fair I don’t hear parents complain about it hardly at all. It’s the politicians, school board and civil rights organizations that cause all the fuss.
    i have a handful of really challenging kids right now, the parents are either uninvolved or don’t care, or totally support consequences. But the school is afraid to enforce anything because of big organizations.
    "Parents uninvolved or don't care", as you  say, is a big part of it.  But how the hell do we get parents to care?  It's a vicious cycle.
    I agree it’s a big part of the problem. Was just pointing out it doesn’t seem to be that parents are behind banning suspensions though.
    I’ve heard parents say “my daughter doesn’t need to graduate, her only job is to give me grand babies” or “when he’s at school he’s your problem, stop calling me about his behavior.” It’s really sad. I don’t know how to get parents like that to care.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,299
    mace1229 said:
    brianlux said:
    mace1229 said:
    brianlux said:
    I just had a great idea.  Let's tell the parents this:

    "OK, here's the deal- you don't want us to suspend your kids when they disrupt the class and make the teacher's job miserable.  So here's what we'll do- instead of suspending the kids for x number of days, we'll keep them and send you a prisoner for x number of days.  That way, you get to see what might become of your kids if you keep fucking up your parenting.  Deal?  Deal."

    What do think?  Too much?
    To be fair I don’t hear parents complain about it hardly at all. It’s the politicians, school board and civil rights organizations that cause all the fuss.
    i have a handful of really challenging kids right now, the parents are either uninvolved or don’t care, or totally support consequences. But the school is afraid to enforce anything because of big organizations.
    "Parents uninvolved or don't care", as you  say, is a big part of it.  But how the hell do we get parents to care?  It's a vicious cycle.
    I agree it’s a big part of the problem. Was just pointing out it doesn’t seem to be that parents are behind banning suspensions though.
    I’ve heard parents say “my daughter doesn’t need to graduate, her only job is to give me grand babies” or “when he’s at school he’s your problem, stop calling me about his behavior.” It’s really sad. I don’t know how to get parents like that to care.
    That is sad, for sure.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • SmellymanSmellyman AsiaPosts: 3,775
    I think most of these kids have shit parents.  Sending them to shit parents will make it worse.

    Just saying parents need to be better or have face consequences  will never work until government sponsored spay and neuters take place.
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