Living without money.

24

Comments

  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 12,074
    brianlux said:
    What a concept!  If I were younger and not happily attached, I would definitely consider trying this.  My wife read the book, The Man Who Quit Money by Mark Sundeen which she passed on to me.  It tells the story of Daniel Suelo who left his life savings of $30 in a phone booth in 2000 and has live without money since.  It's an amazing story.  There are others who have and are doing the same.  Here are some of those people:
    Daniel Suelo:

    Mark Boyle, also know as "The Moneyless Man", Irish activist and founder of Freeconomy Community, has lived without money since 2008:

    I love this concept.  Oh to me young again!
    Glasses cost something.  That necklace costs something.  His clothes cost something.

    Where does he live?  If he has property there is always a "property tax" unless he is squatting somewhere?

    You could choose to live like this as long as you don't have other people that rely on you.  A wife or kids?  Doing that with them would be a selfish act.

    I like the idea of living off grid but no money?  No thank you.
    If you think further outside the box you might be able to accept it a little more...radical, yes, but selfish?  Probably not.  A strong family is a team, not a squad of cheerleaders that relies on the quarterback alone.

    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    brianlux said:
    What a concept!  If I were younger and not happily attached, I would definitely consider trying this.  My wife read the book, The Man Who Quit Money by Mark Sundeen which she passed on to me.  It tells the story of Daniel Suelo who left his life savings of $30 in a phone booth in 2000 and has live without money since.  It's an amazing story.  There are others who have and are doing the same.  Here are some of those people:
    Daniel Suelo:

    Glasses cost something.  That necklace costs something.  His clothes cost something.

    Where does he live?  If he has property there is always a "property tax" unless he is squatting somewhere?

    You could choose to live like this as long as you don't have other people that rely on you.  A wife or kids?  Doing that with them would be a selfish act.

    I like the idea of living off grid but no money?  No thank you.
    It's late so I'm going to be lazy-- here's a fairly short article that explains of lot about Suelo:


    I'm not about to try to do this myself- not at 68, but Suelo's story as told by Mark Sundeen is one that gives me pause to examine my own ties with money and to think about what is important to me and what is not.  The book is a great read as well.




    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Into the wild
    That book and McCandless' quest for a simpler life was also inspiring.  And another fine read too!
    I have actually read that Alaska Authorities said that book and the story of McCandliss have been more harmful than anything.  McCandliss was ill-prepared and had no real idea of how to live off-grid or off the land.  Every year Alaska has to do some rescue's along that trail and just a couple weeks ago a honeymooning couple from Europe had tragedy strike when the newlywed bride died crossing a fast-moving river and was swept away 1feet  downriver...

    I wish the media would quit with the romance of living off the land.  Not much of society is equipped to live off the land...
    That's because many people don't read carefully.  If they did, they would not go ou into the wild unprepared.  Krakauer knows these things.  He makes it clear.   Some people just don't think critically or plan well.  That's not Krakauer's fault.   As for the romance of living off the land, that is also not Krakauer's invention.  What is made of his book is not his doing.
    You can only gain so much from a book. When it come to living off he land one should probably start off by doing a couple of overnighters while increasing the length until they feel they could survive while being out of touch.  A book can teach you to hunt but it will not harvest your prey for you...you still must do that.
    That's true.  I've not lived like Suelo but I've spent time in the wilderness and I've been close to being homeless having lived in vehicle for a couple of years simply because at the time I had no other choice.  Suelo does what he does on purpose and with a purpose.  His story is fascinating and the book I mentioned is excellent.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    A friend brought this video to my attention.  It summarizes Suelo's story very well:


    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 19,648
    rgambs said:
    brianlux said:
    What a concept!  If I were younger and not happily attached, I would definitely consider trying this.  My wife read the book, The Man Who Quit Money by Mark Sundeen which she passed on to me.  It tells the story of Daniel Suelo who left his life savings of $30 in a phone booth in 2000 and has live without money since.  It's an amazing story.  There are others who have and are doing the same.  Here are some of those people:
    Daniel Suelo:

    Mark Boyle, also know as "The Moneyless Man", Irish activist and founder of Freeconomy Community, has lived without money since 2008:

    I love this concept.  Oh to me young again!
    Glasses cost something.  That necklace costs something.  His clothes cost something.

    Where does he live?  If he has property there is always a "property tax" unless he is squatting somewhere?

    You could choose to live like this as long as you don't have other people that rely on you.  A wife or kids?  Doing that with them would be a selfish act.

    I like the idea of living off grid but no money?  No thank you.
    If you think further outside the box you might be able to accept it a little more...radical, yes, but selfish?  Probably not.  A strong family is a team, not a squad of cheerleaders that relies on the quarterback alone.

    Here is where you and I will see things very different.

    If you decide to bring kids into this lifestyle they will never have any real knowledge of "the world".  This can be said about certain religions or class structures.  If they can't live outside the box they are currently in and see what else is there to offer you are selfish and holding them back for this is all they know.

    Best thing I ever did was get out of NY and try new things, see new places.  I had opportunity to do and see other things, food, countries, lifestyles. Doing this lack of money lifestyle doesn't give you that opportunity.

    Relying on each other would make codependency a common factor too.  The team needs each other so wanting to go off and do your own thing would in turn look selfish.

    Not for me.

    So I have thought further outside the box and I see it as putting you in a box more than anything.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 19,648
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    What a concept!  If I were younger and not happily attached, I would definitely consider trying this.  My wife read the book, The Man Who Quit Money by Mark Sundeen which she passed on to me.  It tells the story of Daniel Suelo who left his life savings of $30 in a phone booth in 2000 and has live without money since.  It's an amazing story.  There are others who have and are doing the same.  Here are some of those people:
    Daniel Suelo:

    Glasses cost something.  That necklace costs something.  His clothes cost something.

    Where does he live?  If he has property there is always a "property tax" unless he is squatting somewhere?

    You could choose to live like this as long as you don't have other people that rely on you.  A wife or kids?  Doing that with them would be a selfish act.

    I like the idea of living off grid but no money?  No thank you.
    It's late so I'm going to be lazy-- here's a fairly short article that explains of lot about Suelo:


    I'm not about to try to do this myself- not at 68, but Suelo's story as told by Mark Sundeen is one that gives me pause to examine my own ties with money and to think about what is important to me and what is not.  The book is a great read as well.




    I'm sure the book would be a good read but again, lifestyle without money is not for me.

    I did find this quote from him interesting.
    “When I lived with money, I was always lacking. Money represents lack. Money represents things in the past (debt) and things in the future (credit), but money never represents what is present.” 

    It would seem that he was always lacking considering his life savings was a mere $30 when he decided to quit money, lol.
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 5,213
    I can get living without debt, but I am with Tempo when it comes to completely trying to live without any money at all.  
    "At least I'm housebroken"
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    What a concept!  If I were younger and not happily attached, I would definitely consider trying this.  My wife read the book, The Man Who Quit Money by Mark Sundeen which she passed on to me.  It tells the story of Daniel Suelo who left his life savings of $30 in a phone booth in 2000 and has live without money since.  It's an amazing story.  There are others who have and are doing the same.  Here are some of those people:
    Daniel Suelo:

    Glasses cost something.  That necklace costs something.  His clothes cost something.

    Where does he live?  If he has property there is always a "property tax" unless he is squatting somewhere?

    You could choose to live like this as long as you don't have other people that rely on you.  A wife or kids?  Doing that with them would be a selfish act.

    I like the idea of living off grid but no money?  No thank you.
    It's late so I'm going to be lazy-- here's a fairly short article that explains of lot about Suelo:


    I'm not about to try to do this myself- not at 68, but Suelo's story as told by Mark Sundeen is one that gives me pause to examine my own ties with money and to think about what is important to me and what is not.  The book is a great read as well.




    I'm sure the book would be a good read but again, lifestyle without money is not for me.

    I did find this quote from him interesting.
    “When I lived with money, I was always lacking. Money represents lack. Money represents things in the past (debt) and things in the future (credit), but money never represents what is present.” 

    It would seem that he was always lacking considering his life savings was a mere $30 when he decided to quit money, lol.
    I would find this very difficult to do at this point in my life, but if I were a young man now and had read this book and learned more about this way of living, I'm not sure how well or how long I could do it, but I think I might give it a try at least. 

    Beyond the fact the book is very well written and engaging, it also led me to re-evaluate by ties with money and to consider what matters to me and doesn't matter.  I may not change my way of living greatly but I very much appreciate something that challenges my thinking and affects my outlook on life in ways that are meaningful. 

    The only times I really bought into the trappings of consumer were the years when I moved back to the Bay Area from about 1979 though 1989 and tried to live like a consuming little silicon valley man, trying to blend with the crowd my then wife had fallen in with.  I hated it.  I hated the quest for more money, more stuff, more status.  She left me and I left that god-awful lifestyle but then later ended up in a bad situation when my hearing was damaged such that I could no longer teach and ended up living in my van for a few years.  Those were bad times but having little money and few possessions was the least of my problems. 

    I do pretty well these day but kind of miss the simplicity of my semi-homeless days.  But after getting back on my feet, I did, for awhile begin pursuing the desire to have more things once again.  There is no freedom or joy in that.  I'm scaling back again and getting ready for soon to be living on a fixed income.  I think Suelo's influences will help me a lot through this last phase of my life.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 19,791
    It's not about money; money itself isn't evil - no more than anyone else of wealth, average or not, who's earned it.

    It's what we choose to do with it, how we acquire it, save it (wanderlust is wonderful but reality is a hard-hitter), even - gasp! - treat ourselves to some things.  Help out a fellow man if able.

    I get the sense some feel this guy is noble in his quest, and maybe he is.  Regardless, it's great that it seems to work for him.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    hedonist said:
    It's not about money; money itself isn't evil - no more than anyone else of wealth, average or not, who's earned it.

    It's what we choose to do with it, how we acquire it, save it (wanderlust is wonderful but reality is a hard-hitter), even - gasp! - treat ourselves to some things.  Help out a fellow man if able.

    I get the sense some feel this guy is noble in his quest, and maybe he is.  Regardless, it's great that it seems to work for him.
    That's about how I see it.  I try to keep a positive perspective on money, generally use it as wisely as possible, give a percentage of what I have, and be thankful for how much I have rather than get in a knot about how much I don't have.

    I do see Suelo  as being a noble and good person in the way he sets a fine example by staying true to his convictions and showing us that there are ways to live well (that being a relative term) beyond simply being well-off.  But I try to avoid hero worship and focus more on seeing what I can learn from someone's good example.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • eddieceddiec Posts: 3,003
    This has probably been posted on these boards but is apt for this thread. Takes one minute to read.

    There was once a businessman who was sitting by the beach in a small Brazilian village.
    As he sat, he saw a Brazilian fisherman rowing a small boat towards the shore having caught quite few big fish.
    The businessman was impressed and asked the fisherman, “How long does it take you to catch so many fish?”
    The fisherman replied, “Oh, just a short while.”
    “Then why don’t you stay longer at sea and catch even more?” The businessman was astonished.
    “This is enough to feed my whole family,” the fisherman said.
    The businessman then asked, “So, what do you do for the rest of the day?”
    The fisherman replied, “Well, I usually wake up early in the morning, go out to sea and catch a few fish, then go back and play with my kids. In the afternoon, I take a nap with my wife, and evening comes, I join my buddies in the village for a drink — we play guitar, sing and dance throughout the night.”

    The businessman offered a suggestion to the fisherman.
    “I am a PhD in business management. I could help you to become a more successful person. From now on, you should spend more time at sea and try to catch as many fish as possible. When you have saved enough money, you could buy a bigger boat and catch even more fish. Soon you will be able to afford to buy more boats, set up your own company, your own production plant for canned food and distribution network. By then, you will have moved out of this village and to Sao Paulo, where you can set up HQ to manage your other branches.”

    The fisherman continues, “And after that?”
    The businessman laughs heartily, “After that, you can live like a king in your own house, and when the time is right, you can go public and float your shares in the Stock Exchange, and you will be rich.”
    The fisherman asks, “And after that?”
    The businessman says, “After that, you can finally retire, you can move to a house by the fishing village, wake up early in the morning, catch a few fish, then return home to play with kids, have a nice afternoon nap with your wife, and when evening comes, you can join your buddies for a drink, play the guitar, sing and dance throughout the night!”
    The fisherman was puzzled, “Isn’t that what I am doing now?”

  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 12,074
    The American way, to work work work for a retirement so you can sit back and regret all the things you didn't do when you were young enough to do them.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 5,213
    rgambs said:
    The American way, to work work work for a retirement so you can sit back and regret all the things you didn't do when you were young enough to do them.
    I don’t know about that.  Working has helped me tremendously in being able to afford to do the thing I’ve done while young...I guess it is all relative to your individuality.
    "At least I'm housebroken"
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    rgambs said:
    The American way, to work work work for a retirement so you can sit back and regret all the things you didn't do when you were young enough to do them.
    Sad, isn't it?  But that's what our schooling is all about- turning people into worker bees so they can make money to buy a lot of stuff that's poorly made and constantly needs to be replaced and most of which does not hold one's attention for very long or is unneeded in the first place.  Consumer worker bees, the American Way.  To anyone who strives to live outside those constricting parameters, I say "good for you!" 
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • The JugglerThe Juggler Behind that bush over there.Posts: 34,320
    I don't know, man. I kind of like money. 
    chinese-happy.jpg
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    I don't know, man. I kind of like money. 
    I like cool looking old coins and colorful money from other countries.  :smiley:
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • pearljammr78pearljammr78 Posts: 536
    I like good food and vinyl. I love being outdoors but that takes gas to get too. All things mentioned take money. 
    Peace,Love and Pearl Jam.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    I like good food and vinyl. I love being outdoors but that takes gas to get too. All things mentioned take money. 
    This is true.  But the best things in life have no relation to money.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • pearljammr78pearljammr78 Posts: 536
    brianlux said:
    I like good food and vinyl. I love being outdoors but that takes gas to get too. All things mentioned take money. 
    This is true.  But the best things in life have no relation to money.
    You are so correct. Love is free. And according to The Beatles, “Love is all you need” 
    Peace,Love and Pearl Jam.
  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 19,791
    It brings peace of mind as well.  Mortgage payments, food, electricity...the basics.  Unless one fully embraces the OP's way of living, it's simply neither feasible nor realistic for most to actually do it.

    Love is wonderful, and needed too, but it's not a cure-all nor does it pay the bills.
  • pearljammr78pearljammr78 Posts: 536
     Love is the most important thing a person can obtain in their life. Health, safety, piece of mind, shelter, I could go on and on forever but those all take money. 
    Peace,Love and Pearl Jam.
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 12,074
    edited August 15
    I'm pretty surprised (though I guess I shouldn't be) at how hard it is for Pearl Jam fans to countenance a lifestyle outside of Western Civilization norms.

    Post edited by rgambs on
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • pearljammr78pearljammr78 Posts: 536
    rgambs said:
    I'm pretty surprised (though I guess I shouldn't be) at how hard it is for Pearl Jam fans to countenance a lifestyle outside of Western Civilization norms.

    How is money and what comes with achieving it a Western Civilization norm? All facets of human society have had some form of currency. And the few that do “survive” without money need many things to work in their favor to even survive. Money brings a lot of evil with it, greed being the main factor in that. To each his own. Whatever anyone wants to do to make their lives complete to them all the power to them. It’s just not for me. 
    Peace,Love and Pearl Jam.
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 12,074
    rgambs said:
    I'm pretty surprised (though I guess I shouldn't be) at how hard it is for Pearl Jam fans to countenance a lifestyle outside of Western Civilization norms.

    How is money and what comes with achieving it a Western Civilization norm? All facets of human society have had some form of currency. And the few that do “survive” without money need many things to work in their favor to even survive. Money brings a lot of evil with it, greed being the main factor in that. To each his own. Whatever anyone wants to do to make their lives complete to them all the power to them. It’s just not for me. 
    Quite a few things have been listed that people seem to think require money and they don't.  Also, a few things have been listed that aren't necessary to a happy or fulfilled life at all.
    Now, I'm not saying this is the right lifestyle, or even a better one, but when people can't even conceive or accept the idea of something different, it shows a high level of inurement within Western norms.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    rgambs said:
    rgambs said:
    I'm pretty surprised (though I guess I shouldn't be) at how hard it is for Pearl Jam fans to countenance a lifestyle outside of Western Civilization norms.

    How is money and what comes with achieving it a Western Civilization norm? All facets of human society have had some form of currency. And the few that do “survive” without money need many things to work in their favor to even survive. Money brings a lot of evil with it, greed being the main factor in that. To each his own. Whatever anyone wants to do to make their lives complete to them all the power to them. It’s just not for me. 
    Quite a few things have been listed that people seem to think require money and they don't.  Also, a few things have been listed that aren't necessary to a happy or fulfilled life at all.
    Now, I'm not saying this is the right lifestyle, or even a better one, but when people can't even conceive or accept the idea of something different, it shows a high level of inurement within Western norms.
    Well said.

    Another thing worth considering is this:  Does having money really provide peace of mind?  I think it does the opposite.  I think it increases worry.  People who have lived (and a few who still do) in hunter gather societies worry much less than those of us who live in the civilized world.  And other than a few rare exceptions like squirrels and beavers, most animals do not prepare for the future.  They live in the here and now.  They eat plants and the bodies of other animals, but do not store up "wealth for the future".  And when they die, their bodies become part of the cycle.  I think that's a beautiful thing.

    As I've said, at my age and at this point in my life, a money free way of living is just not going to happen.  But I can imagine it and may have tried it when I was younger.  And if nothing else, looking at this alternative to western modern culture provides the opportunity to re-evaluate one's ties to money, to think about what is really important and what is not so important.  And for someone like me who is very prone to worrying, it helps me to see life in a different way that gives me the perspective to see how useless that worrying is.  And it's helped me to be more generous.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 19,648
    rgambs said:
    rgambs said:
    I'm pretty surprised (though I guess I shouldn't be) at how hard it is for Pearl Jam fans to countenance a lifestyle outside of Western Civilization norms.

    How is money and what comes with achieving it a Western Civilization norm? All facets of human society have had some form of currency. And the few that do “survive” without money need many things to work in their favor to even survive. Money brings a lot of evil with it, greed being the main factor in that. To each his own. Whatever anyone wants to do to make their lives complete to them all the power to them. It’s just not for me. 
    Quite a few things have been listed that people seem to think require money and they don't.  Also, a few things have been listed that aren't necessary to a happy or fulfilled life at all.
    Now, I'm not saying this is the right lifestyle, or even a better one, but when people can't even conceive or accept the idea of something different, it shows a high level of inurement within Western norms.
    We actually debated why it isn't something for us. I looked at the idea and find it to not be very rewarding in an older age or if you have family to rely on. I've accepted that it isn't for me.

    Next time you go hunting use a bow and arrow that you made yourself.  I wouldn't want you to have any inruement with those modern western hunting ways.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 6,951
    rgambs said:
    brianlux said:
    Into the wild
    That book and McCandless' quest for a simpler life was also inspiring.  And another fine read too!
    I have actually read that Alaska Authorities said that book and the story of McCandliss have been more harmful than anything.  McCandliss was ill-prepared and had no real idea of how to live off-grid or off the land.  Every year Alaska has to do some rescue's along that trail and just a couple weeks ago a honeymooning couple from Europe had tragedy strike when the newlywed bride died crossing a fast-moving river and was swept away 1feet  downriver...

    I wish the media would quit with the romance of living off the land.  Not much of society is equipped to live off the land...
    That is not an accurate summary of the McCandless story.  He was pretty well prepared and he was living quite successfully until he got sick, most likely from a fungal infection.

    Yes, his story has inspired idiots to exercise their idiocy, but a cursory glance at the SAR records of any major National Park will show that idiots love to exercise their idiocy at every opportunity.
    Into the Wild
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Into_the_Wild_(film)

    Noting McCandless' unpreparedness, the stranger who drops him off lends him a pair of boots.  

    Four months later, at the abandoned bus, life for McCandless becomes harder, and he begins to make poor decisions. As his supplies begin to run out, he realizes that nature is also harsh and uncaring. 

    Dude.  The guy did not even have the most basic equipment...good hiking boots.  That sounds like some who was prepared.  He did not even make it summer.

    If he was prepared he would have known about the runoff that causes that particular river hard to cross.  

  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 12,074
    rgambs said:
    brianlux said:
    Into the wild
    That book and McCandless' quest for a simpler life was also inspiring.  And another fine read too!
    I have actually read that Alaska Authorities said that book and the story of McCandliss have been more harmful than anything.  McCandliss was ill-prepared and had no real idea of how to live off-grid or off the land.  Every year Alaska has to do some rescue's along that trail and just a couple weeks ago a honeymooning couple from Europe had tragedy strike when the newlywed bride died crossing a fast-moving river and was swept away 1feet  downriver...

    I wish the media would quit with the romance of living off the land.  Not much of society is equipped to live off the land...
    That is not an accurate summary of the McCandless story.  He was pretty well prepared and he was living quite successfully until he got sick, most likely from a fungal infection.

    Yes, his story has inspired idiots to exercise their idiocy, but a cursory glance at the SAR records of any major National Park will show that idiots love to exercise their idiocy at every opportunity.
    Into the Wild
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Into_the_Wild_(film)

    Noting McCandless' unpreparedness, the stranger who drops him off lends him a pair of boots.  

    Four months later, at the abandoned bus, life for McCandless becomes harder, and he begins to make poor decisions. As his supplies begin to run out, he realizes that nature is also harsh and uncaring. 

    Dude.  The guy did not even have the most basic equipment...good hiking boots.  That sounds like some who was prepared.  He did not even make it summer.

    If he was prepared he would have known about the runoff that causes that particular river hard to cross.  

    Did you really just quote a Wikipedia article about a Hollywood film based on a book as a source? lol
    Try again.  Read the book and Krakauer's interviews and notes.
    Quoting the movie summary lol
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,094
    Suelo is not the first person (or last) to consider living without money.  In fact, there are movements that envision societies without money.  Here's one I came across called The Freed World Charter. (I don't know a lot about it yet but am interested.)  There website makes a good point:

    "Everything we need for survival: water, food, air, energy, biodiversity, compassion, have become jeopardized through our prioritisation of profit over nature."


    Ernest Callenbach who wrote the well known book, Ecotopia, stated, “It is so hard to imagine anything fundamentally different from what we have now. But without these alternate visions, we get stuck on dead center. And we’d better get ready. We need to know where we’d like to go.”

    Our economic system with its estrangement from nature is destructive at its core.  If we don't widen our vision and seek new ways to live, we will have no future as a species.  None of this will happen over night, but if we don't start thinking outside the box, we carry on toward our own peril.



    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 6,951
    edited August 15
    rgambs said:
    rgambs said:
    brianlux said:
    Into the wild
    That book and McCandless' quest for a simpler life was also inspiring.  And another fine read too!
    I have actually read that Alaska Authorities said that book and the story of McCandliss have been more harmful than anything.  McCandliss was ill-prepared and had no real idea of how to live off-grid or off the land.  Every year Alaska has to do some rescue's along that trail and just a couple weeks ago a honeymooning couple from Europe had tragedy strike when the newlywed bride died crossing a fast-moving river and was swept away 1feet  downriver...

    I wish the media would quit with the romance of living off the land.  Not much of society is equipped to live off the land...
    That is not an accurate summary of the McCandless story.  He was pretty well prepared and he was living quite successfully until he got sick, most likely from a fungal infection.

    Yes, his story has inspired idiots to exercise their idiocy, but a cursory glance at the SAR records of any major National Park will show that idiots love to exercise their idiocy at every opportunity.
    Into the Wild
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Into_the_Wild_(film)

    Noting McCandless' unpreparedness, the stranger who drops him off lends him a pair of boots.  

    Four months later, at the abandoned bus, life for McCandless becomes harder, and he begins to make poor decisions. As his supplies begin to run out, he realizes that nature is also harsh and uncaring. 

    Dude.  The guy did not even have the most basic equipment...good hiking boots.  That sounds like some who was prepared.  He did not even make it summer.

    If he was prepared he would have known about the runoff that causes that particular river hard to cross.  

    Did you really just quote a Wikipedia article about a Hollywood film based on a book as a source? lol
    Try again.  Read the book and Krakauer's interviews and notes.
    Quoting the movie summary lol
    Dude...all you do is flap your gums about how right you are and how wrong everyone else...you are a baffle them with bullshit kind of guy...not dazzle them with brilliance.  You should learn to ignore my post because I think very little of you...and some of your ridiculous post...


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