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A sensible, hope filled all-purpose heavy duty Global Warming/ Climate Change thread.

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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    mickeyrat said:
    brianlux said:

    I'm curious about this article as to whom is ripping out their solar panels?  Everyone I know that has them "rented" them from the power companies and signed a lease for 20 years or so.  That big incentive was 5 years ago so there are at least another 15 for them.

    It's a shame that there isn't more recyclable parts on them.  Go figure a "green" source of energy is a mass polluter when it's lifespan is over...

    James Howard Kunstler is an author and commentator who I followed for several years.  I gave up following him when he started going into some rather dubious political directions, but earlier, when his focus was energy, he really went out of his way to gather good information and present it in a clear and logical manner (as in his book, The Long Emergency).  One of the things he explained very clearly  were the obvious short coming of solar energy (and this was before some of the very solid evidence that solar fields are wrecking havoc on fragile desert ecosystems).  His words were not headed and many well-intentioned folks seeking to maintain a comfortable life style in a manner they thought was environmentally friendly dove into solar power with, at least to a degree, some blinders on.  What many do not get, or refuse to accept, is that in a world with 7.9 (give or take) billion people, more and more of us living like royalty and expecting a "green" planet is, as yet at least, not at all feasible.  
    I remember you bringing up the deserts and the solar panels.  I disagree with that a bunch and I wish Kunstler would go and revisit that and see if his theories prove true.

    The desert, Mojave for example has millions and millions of unused acreage where solar takes up a very small area of it.  

    What I do find alarming is that the solar panels have zero recyclable properties.

    I do remember a little snippet in Rolling Stone magazine in their "For us/Against us" page and in the Against us side it talked about George W removing the solar panels from when Carter was president.  It forgot to mention that he replaced them with brand new panels and a solar water heaters.
    its not zero recyclable. its very little is cost effective to recycle. big difference.

    Not really.  If it isn't cost effective to recycle then you're not so in the landfill it goes.
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 23,138
    mickeyrat said:
    brianlux said:

    I'm curious about this article as to whom is ripping out their solar panels?  Everyone I know that has them "rented" them from the power companies and signed a lease for 20 years or so.  That big incentive was 5 years ago so there are at least another 15 for them.

    It's a shame that there isn't more recyclable parts on them.  Go figure a "green" source of energy is a mass polluter when it's lifespan is over...

    James Howard Kunstler is an author and commentator who I followed for several years.  I gave up following him when he started going into some rather dubious political directions, but earlier, when his focus was energy, he really went out of his way to gather good information and present it in a clear and logical manner (as in his book, The Long Emergency).  One of the things he explained very clearly  were the obvious short coming of solar energy (and this was before some of the very solid evidence that solar fields are wrecking havoc on fragile desert ecosystems).  His words were not headed and many well-intentioned folks seeking to maintain a comfortable life style in a manner they thought was environmentally friendly dove into solar power with, at least to a degree, some blinders on.  What many do not get, or refuse to accept, is that in a world with 7.9 (give or take) billion people, more and more of us living like royalty and expecting a "green" planet is, as yet at least, not at all feasible.  
    I remember you bringing up the deserts and the solar panels.  I disagree with that a bunch and I wish Kunstler would go and revisit that and see if his theories prove true.

    The desert, Mojave for example has millions and millions of unused acreage where solar takes up a very small area of it.  

    What I do find alarming is that the solar panels have zero recyclable properties.

    I do remember a little snippet in Rolling Stone magazine in their "For us/Against us" page and in the Against us side it talked about George W removing the solar panels from when Carter was president.  It forgot to mention that he replaced them with brand new panels and a solar water heaters.
    its not zero recyclable. its very little is cost effective to recycle. big difference.

    Not really.  If it isn't cost effective to recycle then you're not so in the landfill it goes.

    which doesnt equate to cant be recycled.

    again, big difference between cant and wont.
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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:
    brianlux said:

    I'm curious about this article as to whom is ripping out their solar panels?  Everyone I know that has them "rented" them from the power companies and signed a lease for 20 years or so.  That big incentive was 5 years ago so there are at least another 15 for them.

    It's a shame that there isn't more recyclable parts on them.  Go figure a "green" source of energy is a mass polluter when it's lifespan is over...

    James Howard Kunstler is an author and commentator who I followed for several years.  I gave up following him when he started going into some rather dubious political directions, but earlier, when his focus was energy, he really went out of his way to gather good information and present it in a clear and logical manner (as in his book, The Long Emergency).  One of the things he explained very clearly  were the obvious short coming of solar energy (and this was before some of the very solid evidence that solar fields are wrecking havoc on fragile desert ecosystems).  His words were not headed and many well-intentioned folks seeking to maintain a comfortable life style in a manner they thought was environmentally friendly dove into solar power with, at least to a degree, some blinders on.  What many do not get, or refuse to accept, is that in a world with 7.9 (give or take) billion people, more and more of us living like royalty and expecting a "green" planet is, as yet at least, not at all feasible.  
    I remember you bringing up the deserts and the solar panels.  I disagree with that a bunch and I wish Kunstler would go and revisit that and see if his theories prove true.

    The desert, Mojave for example has millions and millions of unused acreage where solar takes up a very small area of it.  

    What I do find alarming is that the solar panels have zero recyclable properties.

    I do remember a little snippet in Rolling Stone magazine in their "For us/Against us" page and in the Against us side it talked about George W removing the solar panels from when Carter was president.  It forgot to mention that he replaced them with brand new panels and a solar water heaters.
    its not zero recyclable. its very little is cost effective to recycle. big difference.

    Not really.  If it isn't cost effective to recycle then you're not so in the landfill it goes.

    which doesnt equate to cant be recycled.

    again, big difference between cant and wont.
    In that article it says it costs $20-$30 to recycle the panel and you get $1-$2 for a return on that.  That's not good. I'm not taking up that loss if I don't have to as a corporation.

    The article also mentions holding solar companies responsible for their product.  I like that idea.  Make them develop something that has value even after it's intended use. 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:

    I'm curious about this article as to whom is ripping out their solar panels?  Everyone I know that has them "rented" them from the power companies and signed a lease for 20 years or so.  That big incentive was 5 years ago so there are at least another 15 for them.

    It's a shame that there isn't more recyclable parts on them.  Go figure a "green" source of energy is a mass polluter when it's lifespan is over...

    James Howard Kunstler is an author and commentator who I followed for several years.  I gave up following him when he started going into some rather dubious political directions, but earlier, when his focus was energy, he really went out of his way to gather good information and present it in a clear and logical manner (as in his book, The Long Emergency).  One of the things he explained very clearly  were the obvious short coming of solar energy (and this was before some of the very solid evidence that solar fields are wrecking havoc on fragile desert ecosystems).  His words were not headed and many well-intentioned folks seeking to maintain a comfortable life style in a manner they thought was environmentally friendly dove into solar power with, at least to a degree, some blinders on.  What many do not get, or refuse to accept, is that in a world with 7.9 (give or take) billion people, more and more of us living like royalty and expecting a "green" planet is, as yet at least, not at all feasible.  
    I remember you bringing up the deserts and the solar panels.  I disagree with that a bunch and I wish Kunstler would go and revisit that and see if his theories prove true.

    The desert, Mojave for example has millions and millions of unused acreage where solar takes up a very small area of it.  

    What I do find alarming is that the solar panels have zero recyclable properties.

    I do remember a little snippet in Rolling Stone magazine in their "For us/Against us" page and in the Against us side it talked about George W removing the solar panels from when Carter was president.  It forgot to mention that he replaced them with brand new panels and a solar water heaters.

    I wish I were more qualified to explain why desert solar panel fields are harmful.  I have a cousin who is an environmental lawyer who explained it all in detail.  He would be able to give you much better information on that.   One thing I will say is that I'm surprised you talk about "unused acreage".  Wilderness is unused acreage and surely you value wilderness, right?
    There is plenty of information out there on why desert solar panels are environmentally unsound.  I hope you will take some time to look into it.  I'm not going to argue this subject because I feel too strongly about it and don't want to get into it.  Please at least consider checking it out.
    I thought about this more last night and the areas I had in my mind were pretty much uninhabited and very few humans go to these areas so regeneration happens.

    Thinking about the more popular areas like Jaw bone canyon, Boron and Randsburgh, these areas are not rejuvenating as quickly because of the amount of people and mining done in them.

    I should have been clearer on this.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 9,528
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…
    Give Peas A Chance…
  • ZodZod Posts: 7,924
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    Most miserable heat I've been in wasn't in any desert, it was in Iowa.  110 degrees with humidity.  I would take Iraq's summer any day over that crap.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 9,528
    Arizona in August and 113 degrees…

    get used to the heat…it will become normal soon.

    I live in Southern, Ontario and our summers are hotter and more humid for longer periods…

    in a couple years I’ll be planting a palm tree 🌴 or two.  Lol.

     
    Give Peas A Chance…
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    Arizona in August and 113 degrees…

    get used to the heat…it will become normal soon.

    I live in Southern, Ontario and our summers are hotter and more humid for longer periods…

    in a couple years I’ll be planting a palm tree 🌴 or two.  Lol.

     
    I worked in AZ, worked in the Mojave desert, worked in Iraq, worked in all the south coastal states too.

    Iowa...

    Worked through a heat wave years ago in Cali.  Average was 117 for 2 weeks.  When the water truck came by to keep the dust down we would put our hardhats out to fill them up.  Guy brought in an egg and cooked it on the steel, lol.
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 6,353
    70s and 80s and rainy here in TX all week :). Just got done with a pretty warm couple of weeks, so this is wonderful!
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,557
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    brianlux said:
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    My family are asking about AC units.  One of the buildings my cousin lives in does not have HVAC.  She might have to get a portable or one of those fans you put ice in.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,557
    brianlux said:
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    My family are asking about AC units.  One of the buildings my cousin lives in does not have HVAC.  She might have to get a portable or one of those fans you put ice in.

    Probably not a bad idea for the short term.  I looked into doing that in my enclosed garage but it stays hot too long her to be efficient and they only cool a small space.  But for you cousin's situation, it might help for a while. 
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • GlowGirlGlowGirl New York, NYPosts: 3,879
    brianlux said:
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    My family are asking about AC units.  One of the buildings my cousin lives in does not have HVAC.  She might have to get a portable or one of those fans you put ice in.
    None of the buildings where I have lived in NYC have had central air. I use a portable unit. It is good for cooling down my apartment pretty well. It is on wheels, so I roll it towards the bedroom at night, and the living room during the day. It takes up some floor space, but I would rather not block a window with a window unit.

  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,541
    GlowGirl said:
    brianlux said:
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    My family are asking about AC units.  One of the buildings my cousin lives in does not have HVAC.  She might have to get a portable or one of those fans you put ice in.
    None of the buildings where I have lived in NYC have had central air. I use a portable unit. It is good for cooling down my apartment pretty well. It is on wheels, so I roll it towards the bedroom at night, and the living room during the day. It takes up some floor space, but I would rather not block a window with a window unit.

    i hate it. we live in a house, but we have a boiler system, so can't get central air. I delay it as long as I can every summer. it blocks half our kitchen window looking out to the back yard. but converting to a furnace/forced air is incredibly expensive (and horrible on my skin lol). 
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    GlowGirl said:
    brianlux said:
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    My family are asking about AC units.  One of the buildings my cousin lives in does not have HVAC.  She might have to get a portable or one of those fans you put ice in.
    None of the buildings where I have lived in NYC have had central air. I use a portable unit. It is good for cooling down my apartment pretty well. It is on wheels, so I roll it towards the bedroom at night, and the living room during the day. It takes up some floor space, but I would rather not block a window with a window unit.

    They make these now so you can still have light and not take up the whole window.
    The Over The Sill Low Profile Air Conditioner - Hammacher Schlemmer

    Also your portable unit doesn't need an exhaust?  Usually they have hot ait that needs to disperse somewhere.  I'm curious to what you use?
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    GlowGirl said:
    brianlux said:
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    My family are asking about AC units.  One of the buildings my cousin lives in does not have HVAC.  She might have to get a portable or one of those fans you put ice in.
    None of the buildings where I have lived in NYC have had central air. I use a portable unit. It is good for cooling down my apartment pretty well. It is on wheels, so I roll it towards the bedroom at night, and the living room during the day. It takes up some floor space, but I would rather not block a window with a window unit.

    i hate it. we live in a house, but we have a boiler system, so can't get central air. I delay it as long as I can every summer. it blocks half our kitchen window looking out to the back yard. but converting to a furnace/forced air is incredibly expensive (and horrible on my skin lol). 
    Cut holes in the walls to insert an AC unit or check out what I posted above.  If you own the house I would definitely cut the hole in it.
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,541
    GlowGirl said:
    brianlux said:
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    My family are asking about AC units.  One of the buildings my cousin lives in does not have HVAC.  She might have to get a portable or one of those fans you put ice in.
    None of the buildings where I have lived in NYC have had central air. I use a portable unit. It is good for cooling down my apartment pretty well. It is on wheels, so I roll it towards the bedroom at night, and the living room during the day. It takes up some floor space, but I would rather not block a window with a window unit.

    i hate it. we live in a house, but we have a boiler system, so can't get central air. I delay it as long as I can every summer. it blocks half our kitchen window looking out to the back yard. but converting to a furnace/forced air is incredibly expensive (and horrible on my skin lol). 
    Cut holes in the walls to insert an AC unit or check out what I posted above.  If you own the house I would definitely cut the hole in it.
    I've been trying to convince my wife we need to do a permanent wall fixture like you say, for YEARS. she doesn't want to do it. yet she hates the kitchen window being half blocked for half the year as much as I do. 

    I'm going to check into that other unit pictured above. that looks awesome. 
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,541
    can I ask where you found that picture?
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    can I ask where you found that picture?
    It's called a "saddle AC Unit".  Game changer.

    https://www.amazon.com/Soleus-Air-Exclusive-Conditioner-Putting/dp/B085P28D2S/ref=asc_df_B085P28D2S/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=416635897840&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=15590866704248267986&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9004451&hvtargid=pla-902231872245&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=94717455060&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=416635897840&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=15590866704248267986&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9004451&hvtargid=pla-902231872245

    They also make a U shaped one that the window closes in the middle of it but that won't solve your window problem.

    Hole in the house is the way to go though.  It's out of the way of everything and should have no bearing on the look.  Hang a picture over it during the winter, lol.


  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 9,528
    Hot in southern Ontario today...love central air.  Better get used to the heatwaves...
    Give Peas A Chance…
  • GlowGirlGlowGirl New York, NYPosts: 3,879
    GlowGirl said:
    brianlux said:
    Lytton, BC set a Canadian Record at 114 degrees on Sunday…wow…that is hot 🥵.  BC is having a heatwave…

    Zod said:
    This is pretty crazy,

    We had a run of longer/hotter summers, then the last two years were more of a return to normal (more mild).   We didn't even have campfire bans the last 2 years.  Now summer is back with a vengeance.

    This is rough.   I've never seen it this hot on Vancouver Island ever.   The only places I've been too this hot are Vegas in the summer and The Gorge in the summer.

    This is crazy, guys.  And very concerning.  I know many of you, like my brother and some of my nephews and their families who live in the north west, do not have air conditioning and are not used to this kind of heat.  I lived on Washington's Olympic Peninsula for four years quite some time ago and this kind of heat never happened.  No one had air conditioning nor needed it. 

    Stay safe and stay hydrated!
    My family are asking about AC units.  One of the buildings my cousin lives in does not have HVAC.  She might have to get a portable or one of those fans you put ice in.
    None of the buildings where I have lived in NYC have had central air. I use a portable unit. It is good for cooling down my apartment pretty well. It is on wheels, so I roll it towards the bedroom at night, and the living room during the day. It takes up some floor space, but I would rather not block a window with a window unit.

    They make these now so you can still have light and not take up the whole window.
    The Over The Sill Low Profile Air Conditioner - Hammacher Schlemmer

    Also your portable unit doesn't need an exhaust?  Usually they have hot ait that needs to disperse somewhere.  I'm curious to what you use?


    Yes. It needs a hose out the window. But only blocks a small strip of window. My bedroom door is on the other side of the TV so at night I pull the TV a bit into my bedroom and turn the AC so it faces my bedroom. It’s not the best system but it works for now. The photo you posted would be a good option for my bedroom except that I have a radiator right under that window so it wouldn’t work. 
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 7,959
    Pretty damn hot over there.  Stay safe everyone. Especially the homeless but also pets who people usually keep outside. 

  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 29,139
    Pitcher got heat exhaustion the other day here in the Bronx.

    Stay hydrated my friends.
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 23,138
     

    By JANET McCONNAUGHEY
    Yesterday

    MIKE ISLAND, La. (AP) — Erosion, sinking land and sea rise from climate change have killed the Louisiana woods where a 41-year-old Native American chief played as a child. Not far away in the Mississippi River delta system, middle-school students can stand on islands that emerged the year they were born.

    NASA is using high-tech airborne systems along with boats and mud-slogging work on islands for a $15 million, five-year study of these adjacent areas of Louisiana. One is hitched to a river and growing; the other is disconnected and dying.

    Scientists from NASA and a half-dozen universities from Boston to California aim to create computer models that can be used with satellite data to let countries around the world learn which parts of their dwindling deltas can be shored up and which are past hope.

    “If you have to choose between saving an area and losing another instead of losing everything, you want to know where to put your resources to work to save the livelihood of all the people who live there,” said lead scientist Marc Simard of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Bulltongue arrowhead grows wild along the banks of Hog Bayou, part of the Wax Lake Delta system, inside the Atchafalaya Basin, in St. Mary Parish, La., May 1, 2021. (AP Video/Gerald Herbert)

    While oceans rise because of climate change, the world's river deltas — home to seafood nurseries and more than 300 million people -- are sinking and shrinking.

    To figure out where to shore up dying deltas, NASA is studying water flowing in and out of Louisiana's Atchafalaya and Terrebonne basins, sediment carried by it, and plants that can slow the flow, trap sediment and pull carbon from the air.

    Louisiana holds 40% of the nation’s wetlands, but they’re disappearing fast -- about 2,000 square miles (5,180 square kilometers) of the state have been lost since the 1930s. That’s about 80% of the nation’s wetland losses, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Using two kinds of radar and a spectrometer that measures more colors than the human eye can distinguish, high-altitude NASA airplanes have been collecting information such as water height, slope, sediment, and the types and density of plants. Some measurements are as precise as a couple of centimeters (less than an inch).

    Jack Bush, electrical engineer and radar operator for the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, checks the antennas of a K-band phenomenology airborne radar (Air SWOT), underneath a King Air twin engine airplane, before one of many flights over the Atchafalaya River delta to measure surface water velocity, at New Orleans Lakefront Airport, in New Orleans on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
    Robert Twilley, an LSU scientist and co-lead investigator of the Delta X research project, examines a quick-frozen sample of earth to learn how much sediment has been added to the ground at Mike Island part of the Wax Lake Delta in the Atchafalaya Basin, in St. Mary Parish, La., Friday, April 2, 2021. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
    Mike Lamb, co-investigator, from the California Institute of Technology, and Gen Li, post doctoral scholar, left, capture water samples to measure sediment in the water, on Mike Island, part of the Wax Lake Delta in the Atchafalaya Basin, in St. Mary Parish, La., Friday, April 2, 2021. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
    Andre Rabay, research scientist for the LSU Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science, prepares a canister of liquid nitrogen that he will use to freeze samples of the ground on Mike Island, part of the Wax Lake Delta in the Atchafalaya Basin, in St. Mary Parish, La., Friday, April 2, 2021. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    On boats and islands, scientists and students from across the country take samples and measure everything from currents to diameters of trees. Their findings will be used to calibrate the airborne instruments.

    “I’ve been working here 15 years, and one of the toughest parts about working in a delta is you can only touch one little piece of it at any one time and understand one little piece of it at one time," said Robert Twilley, a professor of oceanography and coastal sciences at Louisiana State University. “Now we have the capability of working with NASA to understand the entire delta.”

    The Mississippi River drains 41% of the continental United States, collecting 150 million tons (130 million metric tons) of sediment per year. But, largely because of flood-prevention levees, most sediment shoots into the Gulf of Mexico rather than settling in wetlands.

    “Deltas are the babies of the geological timescale. They are very young and fragile, in a delicate balance of sinking and growing,” NASA states on the Delta-X project website.

    The Wax Lake Delta in the Atchafalaya Basin is seen from 8,500 feet in St. Mary Parish, La., Tuesday, May 25, 2021. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    In geological time, young means thousands of years. On that scale, Louisiana's Wax Lake Delta is taking its first breaths. It dates to 1942, when the Army Corps of Engineers dug an outlet from the lake to reduce flood threats to Morgan City, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) away. Sediment from the Atchafalaya River filled the lake, then began creating islands in the Gulf.

    The new islands are thick with black willows and, in spring, thigh-high butterweed topped with small yellow flowers.

    Older wetlands in areas surveyed by Delta-X aircraft are more diverse, their soil rich with humus from generations of plants. Along nearby Hog Bayou, blue buntings and scarlet tanagers dart through magnolia branches and skinks skitter up trees. In swamps, ospreys nest atop bald cypresses and alligators float in the water below.

    In addition to working at LSU, Twilley has spent about nine years as executive director of Louisiana Sea Grant College Program, which uses the Wax Lake Delta as a classroom for middle- and high-school students.

    “We take kids and make them stand on land that was formed the year they were born.” Twilley said.

    In contrast, the adjacent Terrebonne Basin is shrinking so rapidly that the government is paying to move the Isle de Jean Charles band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Indians from a vanishing island to higher ground.

    That band isn't the only Native American group losing ground.

    “The wooded areas we used to run through as children -- they’re dead,” said Chief Shirell Parfait-Dardar of the Grand Caillou/Dulac Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha Indians, based less than 50 miles (80 kilometers) from the Wax Lake Delta.

    Cedric Fichot, Boston University assistant professor Department of Earth and Environment drops a compact optical profiling system, measuring light and particle density, into the Wax Lake Delta in the Atchafalaya Basin, in St. Mary Parish, La., Friday, April 2, 2021. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    “Ghost forests” are common in degrading deltas where salt water intrudes as land sinks and erodes, LSU's Twilley said.

    Louisiana is considering two projects that would divert Atchafalaya River sediment to build land in the Terrebonne Basin, but a decision is more than a year away, according to the state Coastal Restoration and Preservation Authority.

    Delta-X's study gets downright granular. A California Institute of Technology team that studies how sediment moves and is deposited on Earth and other planets will analyze the amounts of sediment in high- and low-tide water samples, breaking the particles down into about 100 sizes.

    One way LSU researchers measure how much land has been formed by sediment involves sprinkling white feldspar dust on the ground.

    They return to see how deeply it's buried by new sediment. They do that by injecting liquid nitrogen into hollow tubes to freeze the dirt and muck around them. When the tubes are pulled up, the frozen “popsicles” show a white ring. They measure from there to the top.

    Andre Rabay, research scientist for the LSU Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science, takes core samples on Mike Island, part of the Wax Lake Delta in the Atchafalaya Basin, in St. Mary Parish, La., April 2, 2021.

    In the Terrebonne Basin, such sedimentation can't keep up with subsidence and sea level rise. “Thus the wetlands basically drown,” Twilley said.

    Planes and boats went out in March and April and will go out again in fall for a second set of measurements. And two international satellites are scheduled for launch next year, each carrying one of the two kinds of radar used over Louisiana.

    To gauge how plants affect water movement, long-wavelengths of L-band radar can measure water level changes in open and vegetated channels, NASA's Simard said. And high-frequency Ka-band radar can measure surface height of open water, showing how it slopes -- and where it’s moving.

    “All of the tools they’re bringing to bear is really impressive,” said Indiana University sedimentary geologist Douglas Edmonds, who is not part of the project but has worked with many of the researchers.

    “The project itself is putting a finger on a really essential question for a lot of deltas around the world -- how this deltaic land is formed and what processes take it away," he said.

    ___

    Follow Janet McConnaughey on Twitter: @JanetMcCinNO


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    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
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  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 9,528
    Nearly 500 people in BC have died in the last 5 days, believe to be caused by the heatwave…


    Give Peas A Chance…
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,557
    Nearly 500 people in BC have died in the last 5 days, believe to be caused by the heatwave…



    Looking at various news sources, it's hard to say exactly how many deaths there have been in BC (the numbers I have read from today's news so far include "dozens", 100, 233, 486), but what ever the number, I'm guessing it will rise. 
    First COVID, now this. 
    And that's just BC.   There are lots of other places in western Canada and the North-Western portion of the U.S., and other parts of the US west and southwest where extreme heat has been going on (it's only 101 here so far today).  It feels like the world is coming apart at the seems.  Maybe it is.  I've been thinking for a long time that something like this would happen.  It's unsettling as hell and there's little that can be done except to hang on as best as possible. 
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 23,138
    its just the end of june. summer has just begun.....
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    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 35,557
    mickeyrat said:
    its just the end of june. summer has just begun.....

    Yup!  And after 25 years here in El Dorado County, I've never seen a June this hot.  Three, maybe four more months of dry and warm to hot to go.  Scary times. 
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











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