What is your favorite (or call it "greatest") bioregion in the world?

13

Comments

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,480
    RYME said:
    The Grand Canyon
    Between the top and the bottom you go through 7 different climate zones.
    Used to guide the mule rides on the north rim summer 99.  
    On the top 9000 ft elevation it's like fall all summer. The bottom 200 ft is the same temperature as Phoenix pretty much.  100+ during the summer.  Doesn't pay much by best job I ever had. Actually the funnest job I ever had. Got to ride down and up it every day for a whole summer.
    https://images.app.goo.gl/HVSfHFjRVgC8c3Y56
    Beautiful place but scary too.  I camped in the national forest land on the north rim about ten miles west of the visitors center/ camp ground area.  20 feet from where we camped, the thing dropped straight down into the canyon.  Beautiful but rather unsettling!
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • RYMERYME Wisconsin Posts: 1,527
    edited May 6
    I loved every minute of it
    This is what it looks like between the ears of a mule. ;)

    And then at the end of the day you know there's that lodge there.  If the riders had a good time you go to the bar afterwards and they buy you drinks. There's a special shot & you keep the shotglass and it says I survived the Grand Canyon I don't know what's in it amaretto and something else??  But its good times.  And every evening the guests want to go celebrate with the guides they were with. I met a lot of great people from all around the globe
    I know exactly what you're talking about as to where you were camping me and my buddies camped there a few times just for the heck of it yeah it was great.
    Loved seeing those Kaibab squirrels.
    Post edited by RYME on
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 12,230
    Not exactly a bioregion, but I am a deciduous forest kind of man, myself.
    Lowlands for living and farming, highlands for recreation.
    Either way, it's the ecosystem I was born into and I love it.  Deciduous forest regions usually lack the "wow factor" of rainforests, alpine zones, deserts and coasts, but they are rich and abundant in their own way.  
    I live in the most pedestrian paradise on Earth, but it is a paradise and I have a little piece of it all to myself, which is not something most are lucky enough to have.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 12,230
    Hi! said:
    I love my bioregion because my bioregion is all I know.
    Im honestly not very well traveled but feel fortunate in the area of Michigan I live in.
    Some pics to share of my favorite hiking trails. These are all on the dunes of Lake Michigan.
    The pic with the road is just in the city. These are just from last couple of weeks, it’s early so not very green yet. Ill post more pics as I take them over the summer.

    We visited Nordhouse Dunes last summer and we were almost blown away.  More beautiful than ANY Atlantic Beach I've seen northof Ft Lauderdale!
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    brianlux said:
    After Detroit, I choose Beruit...
    You have a strange notion of what is meant by a "bioregion", LOL.

    OK.  I will be serious.

    Some of my favourites are:

    Canadian Rockies (Banff, Jasper and the icefield parkway) does not get better than that
    Grand Canyon
    Sequoia
    Death Valley
    Everglades
    Bruce Peninsula
    Elk Island

    ...and so many more national parks to visit, but not enough time or money

    ...need a lottery win

    I will post pictures of each after I find...lol

     

  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    Point Pelee near me is a birder paradise...people travel here this time of the year from all over Canada and the US just to add the rare bird to their list.  In the fall, they are busy with people who come to see the monarch butterfly as it is migrating to Mexico.

    But the birder's paradise is no exaggeration in early spring...

    It is also Canada's smallest national park...
  • Hi!Hi! Posts: 1,495
    edited May 6
    rgambs said:
    Hi! said:
    I love my bioregion because my bioregion is all I know.
    Im honestly not very well traveled but feel fortunate in the area of Michigan I live in.
    Some pics to share of my favorite hiking trails. These are all on the dunes of Lake Michigan.
    The pic with the road is just in the city. These are just from last couple of weeks, it’s early so not very green yet. Ill post more pics as I take them over the summe
    We visited Nordhouse Dunes last summer and we were almost blown away.  More beautiful than ANY Atlantic Beach I've seen northof Ft Lauderdale!
    That’s about 2 hr. drive north of this particular spot. Dunes and beaches run basically the entire east coast of Lake Michigan. I haven’t been to Nordhouse Dunes, but have been to the beaches just south of the state park, beautiful area. My daughter just went camping there over the  weekend and loved it. I’m going to try and make it up there this year, maybe after tourist season, lol.
    Post edited by Hi! on
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,297
    dankind said:
    Brooklyn


    Stop it...
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,297
    I am partial to anything in the Caribbean.
  • Hi!Hi! Posts: 1,495
    RYME said:
    I loved every minute of it
    This is what it looks like between the ears of a mule. ;)

    And then at the end of the day you know there's that lodge there.  If the riders had a good time you go to the bar afterwards and they buy you drinks. There's a special shot & you keep the shotglass and it says I survived the Grand Canyon I don't know what's in it amaretto and something else??  But its good times.  And every evening the guests want to go celebrate with the guides they were with. I met a lot of great people from all around the globe
    I know exactly what you're talking about as to where you were camping me and my buddies camped there a few times just for the heck of it yeah it was great.
    Loved seeing those Kaibab squirrels.
    Seeing the Grand Canyon is really the only item on my bucket list(I don’t have a bucket list but if I did). My goal is to take Route 66 down there in the next couple of years. No way I’m riding a mule that damn close to the edge though lol. Must of been amazing.
  • RYMERYME Wisconsin Posts: 1,527
    edited May 6
    Hi! said:
    RYME said:
    I loved every minute of it
    This is what it looks like between the ears of a mule. ;)

    And then at the end of the day you know there's that lodge there.  If the riders had a good time you go to the bar afterwards and they buy you drinks. There's a special shot & you keep the shotglass and it says I survived the Grand Canyon I don't know what's in it amaretto and something else??  But its good times.  And every evening the guests want to go celebrate with the guides they were with. I met a lot of great people from all around the globe
    I know exactly what you're talking about as to where you were camping me and my buddies camped there a few times just for the heck of it yeah it was great.
    Loved seeing those Kaibab squirrels.
    Seeing the Grand Canyon is really the only item on my bucket list(I don’t have a bucket list but if I did). My goal is to take Route 66 down there in the next couple of years. No way I’m riding a mule that damn close to the edge though lol. Must of been amazing.
     =) 
    There has not been a mule related fatality in the Grand Canyon  in over a hundred years on either rim. 15 people on average die in the Grand Canyon hiking.  So you would never ride a mule that close to the edge, I would never go without a mule.
    Some people get heat stroke, dehydration heart attacks some people aren't watching where they're going while taking pictures you know,,,,woops..
    You don't have to fall down a whole mile to kick the bucket, 30 feet can do plenty.
    You don't have to be a really good rider either.  Those mules are well-trained and sturdy.
    You'll just be a little sore at the end of the day between your thighs.  But I highly recommend it and don't forget to go to the bar afterwards and get your
    (I MULED GRAND CANYON shot) & keep the glass.... B)
    Post edited by RYME on
  • Hi!Hi! Posts: 1,495
    RYME said:
    Hi! said:
    RYME said:
    I loved every minute of it
    This is what it looks like between the ears of a mule. ;)

    And then at the end of the day you know there's that lodge there.  If the riders had a good time you go to the bar afterwards and they buy you drinks. There's a special shot & you keep the shotglass and it says I survived the Grand Canyon I don't know what's in it amaretto and something else??  But its good times.  And every evening the guests want to go celebrate with the guides they were with. I met a lot of great people from all around the globe
    I know exactly what you're talking about as to where you were camping me and my buddies camped there a few times just for the heck of it yeah it was great.
    Loved seeing those Kaibab squirrels.
    Seeing the Grand Canyon is really the only item on my bucket list(I don’t have a bucket list but if I did). My goal is to take Route 66 down there in the next couple of years. No way I’m riding a mule that damn close to the edge though lol. Must of been amazing.
     =) 
    There has not been a mule related fatality in the Grand Canyon  in over a hundred years on either rim. 15 people on average die in the Grand Canyon hiking.  So you would never ride a mule that close to the edge, I would never go without a mule.
    Some people die of heat stroke, dehydration heart attacks some people aren't watching where they're going. You don't have to fall down a whole mile to die 30 feet can do plenty of damage.
    You don't even have to be a really good rider either.  Those mules are well-trained.
    You'll just be a little sore at the end of the day between your thighs.  But I highly recommend it and don't forget to go to the bar afterwards and get your I MULED GRAND CANYON SHOT B)
    Lol, thanks, that’s good to know. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,480
    brianlux said:
    After Detroit, I choose Beruit...
    You have a strange notion of what is meant by a "bioregion", LOL.

    OK.  I will be serious.

    Some of my favourites are:

    Canadian Rockies (Banff, Jasper and the icefield parkway) does not get better than that
    Grand Canyon
    Sequoia
    Death Valley
    Everglades
    Bruce Peninsula
    Elk Island

    ...and so many more national parks to visit, but not enough time or money

    ...need a lottery win

    I will post pictures of each after I find...lol

     

    :plus_one:
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,480
    RYME said:
    Hi! said:
    RYME said:
    I loved every minute of it
    This is what it looks like between the ears of a mule. ;)

    And then at the end of the day you know there's that lodge there.  If the riders had a good time you go to the bar afterwards and they buy you drinks. There's a special shot & you keep the shotglass and it says I survived the Grand Canyon I don't know what's in it amaretto and something else??  But its good times.  And every evening the guests want to go celebrate with the guides they were with. I met a lot of great people from all around the globe
    I know exactly what you're talking about as to where you were camping me and my buddies camped there a few times just for the heck of it yeah it was great.
    Loved seeing those Kaibab squirrels.
    Seeing the Grand Canyon is really the only item on my bucket list(I don’t have a bucket list but if I did). My goal is to take Route 66 down there in the next couple of years. No way I’m riding a mule that damn close to the edge though lol. Must of been amazing.
     =) 
    There has not been a mule related fatality in the Grand Canyon  in over a hundred years on either rim. 15 people on average die in the Grand Canyon hiking.  So you would never ride a mule that close to the edge, I would never go without a mule.
    Some people get heat stroke, dehydration heart attacks some people aren't watching where they're going while taking pictures you know,,,,woops..
    You don't have to fall down a whole mile to kick the bucket, 30 feet can do plenty.
    You don't have to be a really good rider either.  Those mules are well-trained and sturdy.
    You'll just be a little sore at the end of the day between your thighs.  But I highly recommend it and don't forget to go to the bar afterwards and get your
    (I MULED GRAND CANYON shot) & keep the glass.... B)
    Imagine...

    ...the sound of a ticking clock.  One Brian Lux enters the screen and climbs aboard a mule.  Cut to the next scene and said mule is ambling along, heading downward into the Grand Canyon, it's rider is sweating bullets.  Cut to next scene and suddenly a sidewinder rattler shimmies past said mule which bucks sending its rider flying into the void.  The sound of screaming fades out as the screen fades to black.

    Over one hundred years, eh?  With my luck... :lol: 
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    brianlux said:
    RYME said:
    Hi! said:
    RYME said:
    I loved every minute of it
    This is what it looks like between the ears of a mule. ;)

    And then at the end of the day you know there's that lodge there.  If the riders had a good time you go to the bar afterwards and they buy you drinks. There's a special shot & you keep the shotglass and it says I survived the Grand Canyon I don't know what's in it amaretto and something else??  But its good times.  And every evening the guests want to go celebrate with the guides they were with. I met a lot of great people from all around the globe
    I know exactly what you're talking about as to where you were camping me and my buddies camped there a few times just for the heck of it yeah it was great.
    Loved seeing those Kaibab squirrels.
    Seeing the Grand Canyon is really the only item on my bucket list(I don’t have a bucket list but if I did). My goal is to take Route 66 down there in the next couple of years. No way I’m riding a mule that damn close to the edge though lol. Must of been amazing.
     =) 
    There has not been a mule related fatality in the Grand Canyon  in over a hundred years on either rim. 15 people on average die in the Grand Canyon hiking.  So you would never ride a mule that close to the edge, I would never go without a mule.
    Some people get heat stroke, dehydration heart attacks some people aren't watching where they're going while taking pictures you know,,,,woops..
    You don't have to fall down a whole mile to kick the bucket, 30 feet can do plenty.
    You don't have to be a really good rider either.  Those mules are well-trained and sturdy.
    You'll just be a little sore at the end of the day between your thighs.  But I highly recommend it and don't forget to go to the bar afterwards and get your
    (I MULED GRAND CANYON shot) & keep the glass.... B)
    Imagine...

    ...the sound of a ticking clock.  One Brian Lux enters the screen and climbs aboard a mule.  Cut to the next scene and said mule is ambling along, heading downward into the Grand Canyon, it's rider is sweating bullets.  Cut to next scene and suddenly a sidewinder rattler shimmies past said mule which bucks sending its rider flying into the void.  The sound of screaming fades out as the screen fades to black.

    Over one hundred years, eh?  With my luck... :lol: 
    Not a fan of Mules...lol
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,480
    brianlux said:
    RYME said:
    Hi! said:
    RYME said:
    I loved every minute of it
    This is what it looks like between the ears of a mule. ;)

    And then at the end of the day you know there's that lodge there.  If the riders had a good time you go to the bar afterwards and they buy you drinks. There's a special shot & you keep the shotglass and it says I survived the Grand Canyon I don't know what's in it amaretto and something else??  But its good times.  And every evening the guests want to go celebrate with the guides they were with. I met a lot of great people from all around the globe
    I know exactly what you're talking about as to where you were camping me and my buddies camped there a few times just for the heck of it yeah it was great.
    Loved seeing those Kaibab squirrels.
    Seeing the Grand Canyon is really the only item on my bucket list(I don’t have a bucket list but if I did). My goal is to take Route 66 down there in the next couple of years. No way I’m riding a mule that damn close to the edge though lol. Must of been amazing.
     =) 
    There has not been a mule related fatality in the Grand Canyon  in over a hundred years on either rim. 15 people on average die in the Grand Canyon hiking.  So you would never ride a mule that close to the edge, I would never go without a mule.
    Some people get heat stroke, dehydration heart attacks some people aren't watching where they're going while taking pictures you know,,,,woops..
    You don't have to fall down a whole mile to kick the bucket, 30 feet can do plenty.
    You don't have to be a really good rider either.  Those mules are well-trained and sturdy.
    You'll just be a little sore at the end of the day between your thighs.  But I highly recommend it and don't forget to go to the bar afterwards and get your
    (I MULED GRAND CANYON shot) & keep the glass.... B)
    Imagine...

    ...the sound of a ticking clock.  One Brian Lux enters the screen and climbs aboard a mule.  Cut to the next scene and said mule is ambling along, heading downward into the Grand Canyon, it's rider is sweating bullets.  Cut to next scene and suddenly a sidewinder rattler shimmies past said mule which bucks sending its rider flying into the void.  The sound of screaming fades out as the screen fades to black.

    Over one hundred years, eh?  With my luck... :lol: 
    Not a fan of Mules...lol
    LOL, actually I love the mules but have an intense fear of falling.  I think it's called acrophobia! 
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • RYMERYME Wisconsin Posts: 1,527
    There are only 8 emojis to choose from. Where do you find the Laughing one??
    This has baffles me. ;)


  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    RYME said:
    There are only 8 emojis to choose from. Where do you find the Laughing one??
    This has baffles me. ;)


    The emoji’s on this website look like they were done by kindergarten class. 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,297
    RYME said:
    There are only 8 emojis to choose from. Where do you find the Laughing one??
    This has baffles me. ;)


    https://blog.vanillaforums.com/product/the-complete-list-vanilla-emoji
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,480
    RYME said:
    There are only 8 emojis to choose from. Where do you find the Laughing one??
    This has baffles me. ;)


    https://blog.vanillaforums.com/product/the-complete-list-vanilla-emoji
    I've also found you can copy and past them from other sites.
     pineapple

    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    Sequoia NP

    Grand Canyon


    Everglades NP



    Costa Rica


    Nicaragua


    Bruce Peninsula

    Cabo


     Point Pelee NP


    Pinery PP


    Death Valley NP






  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,480
    Sequoia NP

    Grand Canyon


    Everglades NP



    Costa Rica


    Nicaragua


    Bruce Peninsula

    Cabo


     Point Pelee NP


    Pinery PP


    Death Valley NP






    Marvelous photos, great places all.

    So what is your favorite bioregion?  For example:
    Bioregion, noun, a region defined by characteristics of the natural environment rather than by man-made divisions.


    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    brianlux said:
    Sequoia NP

    Grand Canyon


    Everglades NP



    Costa Rica


    Nicaragua


    Bruce Peninsula

    Cabo


     Point Pelee NP


    Pinery PP


    Death Valley NP






    Marvelous photos, great places all.

    So what is your favorite bioregion?  For example:
    Bioregion, noun, a region defined by characteristics of the natural environment rather than by man-made divisions.


    Cascadia and Boreal.  Even though I have visited many southern destinations, I absolutely prefer the ruggedness, the remoteness, the beauty, the wildlife, low population growth of Canada's north...
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    Jasper NP





  • Hi!Hi! Posts: 1,495
    I would love to travel to Canada’s boreal forest and or travel through the Canadian Rockies. I watched a documentary awhile ago about a young couple that traveled through Canada in an RV, the scenery looked magical. Unfortunately the 7 or 8 misdemeanors I have on my record would most likely make getting a passport to travel through Canada impossible. My family took a vacation when I was younger through Ontario to the Niagara Falls, that was awesome. I remember the rural, and farm land on the way there to be amazing. Even at a young age I recognized how beautiful it was.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    Hi! said:
    I would love to travel to Canada’s boreal forest and or travel through the Canadian Rockies. I watched a documentary awhile ago about a young couple that traveled through Canada in an RV, the scenery looked magical. Unfortunately the 7 or 8 misdemeanors I have on my record would most likely make getting a passport to travel through Canada impossible. My family took a vacation when I was younger through Ontario to the Niagara Falls, that was awesome. I remember the rural, and farm land on the way there to be amazing. Even at a young age I recognized how beautiful it was.
    The US government issue the passport you need.  Canada does not require Americans to produce anymore that a passport to cross.  As for your misdemeanours, I'm not sure if that would stop you.  Plenty of Canadians travel to the US with felonies...until they are caught, of course.

    The Canadian Rockies are worth the visit...just so majestic.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,480
    brianlux said:
    Sequoia NPSo what is your favorite bioregion?  For example:
    Bioregion, noun, a region defined by characteristics of the natural environment rather than by man-made divisions.


    Cascadia and Boreal.  Even though I have visited many southern destinations, I absolutely prefer the ruggedness, the remoteness, the beauty, the wildlife, low population growth of Canada's north...
    I've only been as far north as Prince George.  Hope to venture further north some day.
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Sequoia NPSo what is your favorite bioregion?  For example:
    Bioregion, noun, a region defined by characteristics of the natural environment rather than by man-made divisions.


    Cascadia and Boreal.  Even though I have visited many southern destinations, I absolutely prefer the ruggedness, the remoteness, the beauty, the wildlife, low population growth of Canada's north...
    I've only been as far north as Prince George.  Hope to venture further north some day.
    Definitely, do. Canada's North is special...I love it...even the cold.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,480
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    Sequoia NPSo what is your favorite bioregion?  For example:
    Bioregion, noun, a region defined by characteristics of the natural environment rather than by man-made divisions.


    Cascadia and Boreal.  Even though I have visited many southern destinations, I absolutely prefer the ruggedness, the remoteness, the beauty, the wildlife, low population growth of Canada's north...
    I've only been as far north as Prince George.  Hope to venture further north some day.
    Definitely, do. Canada's North is special...I love it...even the cold.
    Sounds good!  I do better with cold than hot hot hot hot!
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,260
    brianlux said:
    RYME said:
    Hi! said:
    RYME said:
    I loved every minute of it
    This is what it looks like between the ears of a mule. ;)

    And then at the end of the day you know there's that lodge there.  If the riders had a good time you go to the bar afterwards and they buy you drinks. There's a special shot & you keep the shotglass and it says I survived the Grand Canyon I don't know what's in it amaretto and something else??  But its good times.  And every evening the guests want to go celebrate with the guides they were with. I met a lot of great people from all around the globe
    I know exactly what you're talking about as to where you were camping me and my buddies camped there a few times just for the heck of it yeah it was great.
    Loved seeing those Kaibab squirrels.
    Seeing the Grand Canyon is really the only item on my bucket list(I don’t have a bucket list but if I did). My goal is to take Route 66 down there in the next couple of years. No way I’m riding a mule that damn close to the edge though lol. Must of been amazing.
     =) 
    There has not been a mule related fatality in the Grand Canyon  in over a hundred years on either rim. 15 people on average die in the Grand Canyon hiking.  So you would never ride a mule that close to the edge, I would never go without a mule.
    Some people get heat stroke, dehydration heart attacks some people aren't watching where they're going while taking pictures you know,,,,woops..
    You don't have to fall down a whole mile to kick the bucket, 30 feet can do plenty.
    You don't have to be a really good rider either.  Those mules are well-trained and sturdy.
    You'll just be a little sore at the end of the day between your thighs.  But I highly recommend it and don't forget to go to the bar afterwards and get your
    (I MULED GRAND CANYON shot) & keep the glass.... B)
    Imagine...

    ...the sound of a ticking clock.  One Brian Lux enters the screen and climbs aboard a mule.  Cut to the next scene and said mule is ambling along, heading downward into the Grand Canyon, it's rider is sweating bullets.  Cut to next scene and suddenly a sidewinder rattler shimmies past said mule which bucks sending its rider flying into the void.  The sound of screaming fades out as the screen fades to black.

    Over one hundred years, eh?  With my luck... :lol: 
    @brianlux

    If you have a mule accident they have a crack medical rescue team that will get up the canyon gently. 


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