SpaceX and all the good space stuff

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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 21,176
    All this because the Chinese landed there.

    Go USA!
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,312
    All this because the Chinese landed there.

    Go USA!
    They have been talking about a manned moon mission for years.  I fail to see why 2024 is unrealistic.  The US went to the Moon in less than 10 years after Kennedy challenged the US to get to the Moon...and with inferior technology.  2024 is doable if the will is there.  From a personal standpoint, space is a huge waste of tax dollars...let the private sector monkey around in space.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    All this because the Chinese landed there.

    Go USA!
    They have been talking about a manned moon mission for years.  I fail to see why 2024 is unrealistic.  The US went to the Moon in less than 10 years after Kennedy challenged the US to get to the Moon...and with inferior technology.  2024 is doable if the will is there.  From a personal standpoint, space is a huge waste of tax dollars...let the private sector monkey around in space.
    As other governments from around the world do it, the US really has no choice if it wants to keep up with the future in a global sense. It would be really stupid not to.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,804
    so we went to the moon several times as long as nearly 50 years ago. why are we going back?
    12/29/19
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    so we went to the moon several times as long as nearly 50 years ago. why are we going back?
    Basically to keep an active claim on it while all the other countries go there, I think. Makes sense. Also, because such things keep NASA advancing in terms of technology. If they don't do this, they'd quickly find themselves sorely lagging behind other nations with technology, and not just the technology directly related to space travel. A shitload of technological advancements used on Earth stem from these kinds of ongoing projects too.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,804
    PJ_Soul said:
    so we went to the moon several times as long as nearly 50 years ago. why are we going back?
    Basically to keep an active claim on it while all the other countries go there, I think. Makes sense. Also, because such things keep NASA advancing in terms of technology. If they don't do this, they'd quickly find themselves sorely lagging behind other nations with technology, and not just the technology directly related to space travel. A shitload of technological advancements used on Earth stem from these kinds of ongoing projects too.
    yeah, all that I get, I just don't understand the excitement in this announcement. I mean, Pence is basically talking like this is some big freaking step, when it's been done many times over. 

    active claim on the moon. awesome. I guess we'll need a Space Force after all. :lol:
    12/29/19
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    edited March 27
    PJ_Soul said:
    so we went to the moon several times as long as nearly 50 years ago. why are we going back?
    Basically to keep an active claim on it while all the other countries go there, I think. Makes sense. Also, because such things keep NASA advancing in terms of technology. If they don't do this, they'd quickly find themselves sorely lagging behind other nations with technology, and not just the technology directly related to space travel. A shitload of technological advancements used on Earth stem from these kinds of ongoing projects too.
    yeah, all that I get, I just don't understand the excitement in this announcement. I mean, Pence is basically talking like this is some big freaking step, when it's been done many times over. 

    active claim on the moon. awesome. I guess we'll need a Space Force after all. :lol:
    I kind of assume that trips to the moon now will be a lot more interesting than they used to be. I presume they will now start working on how to establish actual moon bases and stuff... way more exciting than someone just bouncing around for 45 minutes and then leaving for another 10 years, lol.
    As for Pence's announcement... well he's an idiot, lol.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 21,176
    We got tin foil and WD-40 from the initial space tests.  I'd love a new machine lubricant and another way to cook my corn!
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    Well there's a thought! :)

    Are Aliens Ignoring Us? Maybe We're Already Their Captives in a 'Galactic Zoo'

    https://www.space.com/meti-galactic-zoo-aliens.html?utm_source=sdc-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190327-sdc

    Why hasn't Earth received any messages from extraterrestrials yet? Perhaps because we're already unwitting inhabitants in a so-called galactic zoo.

    This was one of the scenarios a group of international researchers explored on March 18 at a meeting organized by the nonprofit organization Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence (METI). The gathering, which took place at the City of Science and Industry museum in Paris (Cité), brought together about 60 scientists who research the possibility of communication with hypothetical intelligent extraterrestrials.

    There, they debated "The Great Silence" — why aliens haven't contacted us — exploring one possibility known as the "zoo hypothesis." First proposed in the 1970s, it describes Earth as a planet that is already under observation by "galactic zookeepers" who are deliberately concealing themselves from human detection, Forbes reported. [9 Strange, Scientific Excuses for Why Humans Haven't Found Aliens Yet]

    "When we try to better understand the universe, the question of whether we are alone is unavoidable," meeting attendee Florence Raulin-Cerceau, an associate professor at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, told Paris-Match.

    That Earth would be the lone planet to evolve and host intelligent life among potentially billions of planets in our galaxy alone seems very unlikely. But if there are intelligent extraterrestrials out there, where are they, and why haven't we found them yet? This conundrum, posed in 1950 by Italian physicist Enrico Fermi, is known as Fermi's Paradox, and it still stymies experts today.

    Fermi didn't live to see evidence of the first exoplanets, which were discovered decades after his death. Since 2014, NASA's Kepler space telescope has confirmed the existence of hundreds of distant worlds, and its findings have hinted at potentially 2,300 more. And yet, despite these exciting exoplanet discoveries, contact with extraterrestrials seems no closer now than it did in Fermi's day.

    Under alien observation?

    One explanation that scientists explored at the METI meeting, is that aliens are aware of Earth and are observing us as we would observe animals kept in a zoo, METI President Douglas Vakoch said in a workshop. If this is the case, humans should increase their efforts to create messages capable of reaching our "keepers," to demonstrate our intelligence, Vakoch explained.

    For example, if a captive zebra were to suddenly tap out a pattern of prime numbers, humans would be required to re-evaluate their understanding of zebra cognition, "and we would be compelled to respond," according to EarthSky.

    But what if we're not part of a vast alien zoo — what if, instead, humanity has been evaluated by alien civilizations, and subsequently "quarantined" from our galactic neighbors?

    It's possible that extraterrestrials are actively isolating us from contact for our own good, because interacting with aliens would be "culturally disruptive" for Earth, meeting co-chair Jean-Pierre Rospars, honorary research director at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), said in a workshop.

    Of course, it's also likely that we haven't heard from aliens because they're locked under a layer of ice in subsurface oceans; trapped on massive "super-Earth" worlds by gravity's intense pull; or dead because their advanced civilizations have already destroyed themselves — as humanity might — through runaway consumption of their planet's natural resources.

    Though, maybe if we want to hear from aliens we just need to relax and be patient. After all, Earth has been around for 4.6 billion years, while extraterrestrial research is less than 100 years old, Paris-Match reported.


    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    edited March 27
    Here are the top 15 "space spin offs" - everyday technology that resulted directly from NASA's space exploration endeavors (there is plenty of non-everyday but important technology too obviously - many thousands of them):

    1. CAT scanner: this cancer-detecting technology was first used to find imperfections in space components.

    2. Computer microchip: modern microchips descend from integrated circuits used in the Apollo Guidance Computer.

    3. Cordless tools: power drills and vacuum cleaners use technology designed to drill for moon samples.

    4. Ear thermometer: a camera-like lens that detects infrared energy we feel as heat was originally used to monitor the birth of stars.

    5. Freeze-dried food: this reduces food weight and increases shelf life without sacrificing nutritional value.

    6. Insulation: home insulation uses reflective material that protects spacecraft from radiation.

    7. Invisible braces: teeth-straightening is less embarrassing thanks to transparent ceramic brace brackets made from spacecraft materials.

    8. Joystick: this computer gaming device was first used on the Apollo Lunar Rover.

    9. Memory foam: created for aircraft seats to soften landing, this foam, which returns to its original shape, is found in mattresses and shock absorbing helmets.

    10. Satellite television: technology used to fix errors in spacecraft signals helps reduce scrambled pictures and sound in satellite television signals.

    11. Scratch resistant lenses: astronaut helmet visor coating makes our spectacles ten times more scratch resistant.

    12. Shoe insoles: athletic shoe companies adapted space boot designs to lessen impact by adding spring and ventilation.

    13. Smoke detector: Nasa invented the first adjustable smoke detector with sensitivity levels to prevent false alarms.

    14. Swimsuit: Nasa used the same principles that reduce drag in space to help create the world’s fastest swimsuit for Speedo, rejected by some professionals for giving an unfair advantage.

    15. Water filter: domestic versions borrow a technique Nasa pioneered to kill bacteria in water taken into space.



    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,804
    PJ_Soul said:
    Well there's a thought! :)

    Are Aliens Ignoring Us? Maybe We're Already Their Captives in a 'Galactic Zoo'

    https://www.space.com/meti-galactic-zoo-aliens.html?utm_source=sdc-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190327-sdc

    Why hasn't Earth received any messages from extraterrestrials yet? Perhaps because we're already unwitting inhabitants in a so-called galactic zoo.

    This was one of the scenarios a group of international researchers explored on March 18 at a meeting organized by the nonprofit organization Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence (METI). The gathering, which took place at the City of Science and Industry museum in Paris (Cité), brought together about 60 scientists who research the possibility of communication with hypothetical intelligent extraterrestrials.

    There, they debated "The Great Silence" — why aliens haven't contacted us — exploring one possibility known as the "zoo hypothesis." First proposed in the 1970s, it describes Earth as a planet that is already under observation by "galactic zookeepers" who are deliberately concealing themselves from human detection, Forbes reported. [9 Strange, Scientific Excuses for Why Humans Haven't Found Aliens Yet]

    "When we try to better understand the universe, the question of whether we are alone is unavoidable," meeting attendee Florence Raulin-Cerceau, an associate professor at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, told Paris-Match.

    That Earth would be the lone planet to evolve and host intelligent life among potentially billions of planets in our galaxy alone seems very unlikely. But if there are intelligent extraterrestrials out there, where are they, and why haven't we found them yet? This conundrum, posed in 1950 by Italian physicist Enrico Fermi, is known as Fermi's Paradox, and it still stymies experts today.

    Fermi didn't live to see evidence of the first exoplanets, which were discovered decades after his death. Since 2014, NASA's Kepler space telescope has confirmed the existence of hundreds of distant worlds, and its findings have hinted at potentially 2,300 more. And yet, despite these exciting exoplanet discoveries, contact with extraterrestrials seems no closer now than it did in Fermi's day.

    Under alien observation?

    One explanation that scientists explored at the METI meeting, is that aliens are aware of Earth and are observing us as we would observe animals kept in a zoo, METI President Douglas Vakoch said in a workshop. If this is the case, humans should increase their efforts to create messages capable of reaching our "keepers," to demonstrate our intelligence, Vakoch explained.

    For example, if a captive zebra were to suddenly tap out a pattern of prime numbers, humans would be required to re-evaluate their understanding of zebra cognition, "and we would be compelled to respond," according to EarthSky.

    But what if we're not part of a vast alien zoo — what if, instead, humanity has been evaluated by alien civilizations, and subsequently "quarantined" from our galactic neighbors?

    It's possible that extraterrestrials are actively isolating us from contact for our own good, because interacting with aliens would be "culturally disruptive" for Earth, meeting co-chair Jean-Pierre Rospars, honorary research director at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), said in a workshop.

    Of course, it's also likely that we haven't heard from aliens because they're locked under a layer of ice in subsurface oceans; trapped on massive "super-Earth" worlds by gravity's intense pull; or dead because their advanced civilizations have already destroyed themselves — as humanity might — through runaway consumption of their planet's natural resources.

    Though, maybe if we want to hear from aliens we just need to relax and be patient. After all, Earth has been around for 4.6 billion years, while extraterrestrial research is less than 100 years old, Paris-Match reported.


    an Alien Ant Farm, so to speak. 
    12/29/19
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 21,176
    PJ_Soul said:
    Here are the top 15 "space spin offs" - everyday technology that resulted directly from NASA's space exploration endeavors (there is plenty of non-everyday but important technology too obviously - many thousands of them):

    1. CAT scanner: this cancer-detecting technology was first used to find imperfections in space components.

    2. Computer microchip: modern microchips descend from integrated circuits used in the Apollo Guidance Computer.

    3. Cordless tools: power drills and vacuum cleaners use technology designed to drill for moon samples.

    4. Ear thermometer: a camera-like lens that detects infrared energy we feel as heat was originally used to monitor the birth of stars.

    5. Freeze-dried food: this reduces food weight and increases shelf life without sacrificing nutritional value.

    6. Insulation: home insulation uses reflective material that protects spacecraft from radiation.

    7. Invisible braces: teeth-straightening is less embarrassing thanks to transparent ceramic brace brackets made from spacecraft materials.

    8. Joystick: this computer gaming device was first used on the Apollo Lunar Rover.

    9. Memory foam: created for aircraft seats to soften landing, this foam, which returns to its original shape, is found in mattresses and shock absorbing helmets.

    10. Satellite television: technology used to fix errors in spacecraft signals helps reduce scrambled pictures and sound in satellite television signals.

    11. Scratch resistant lenses: astronaut helmet visor coating makes our spectacles ten times more scratch resistant.

    12. Shoe insoles: athletic shoe companies adapted space boot designs to lessen impact by adding spring and ventilation.

    13. Smoke detector: Nasa invented the first adjustable smoke detector with sensitivity levels to prevent false alarms.

    14. Swimsuit: Nasa used the same principles that reduce drag in space to help create the world’s fastest swimsuit for Speedo, rejected by some professionals for giving an unfair advantage.

    15. Water filter: domestic versions borrow a technique Nasa pioneered to kill bacteria in water taken into space.



    WD-40 and Tin foil didn't make that list?
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    PJ_Soul said:
    Here are the top 15 "space spin offs" - everyday technology that resulted directly from NASA's space exploration endeavors (there is plenty of non-everyday but important technology too obviously - many thousands of them):

    1. CAT scanner: this cancer-detecting technology was first used to find imperfections in space components.

    2. Computer microchip: modern microchips descend from integrated circuits used in the Apollo Guidance Computer.

    3. Cordless tools: power drills and vacuum cleaners use technology designed to drill for moon samples.

    4. Ear thermometer: a camera-like lens that detects infrared energy we feel as heat was originally used to monitor the birth of stars.

    5. Freeze-dried food: this reduces food weight and increases shelf life without sacrificing nutritional value.

    6. Insulation: home insulation uses reflective material that protects spacecraft from radiation.

    7. Invisible braces: teeth-straightening is less embarrassing thanks to transparent ceramic brace brackets made from spacecraft materials.

    8. Joystick: this computer gaming device was first used on the Apollo Lunar Rover.

    9. Memory foam: created for aircraft seats to soften landing, this foam, which returns to its original shape, is found in mattresses and shock absorbing helmets.

    10. Satellite television: technology used to fix errors in spacecraft signals helps reduce scrambled pictures and sound in satellite television signals.

    11. Scratch resistant lenses: astronaut helmet visor coating makes our spectacles ten times more scratch resistant.

    12. Shoe insoles: athletic shoe companies adapted space boot designs to lessen impact by adding spring and ventilation.

    13. Smoke detector: Nasa invented the first adjustable smoke detector with sensitivity levels to prevent false alarms.

    14. Swimsuit: Nasa used the same principles that reduce drag in space to help create the world’s fastest swimsuit for Speedo, rejected by some professionals for giving an unfair advantage.

    15. Water filter: domestic versions borrow a technique Nasa pioneered to kill bacteria in water taken into space.



    WD-40 and Tin foil didn't make that list?
    Shocking, I know! (Seriously... both are so useful, I love them, lol)
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,505
    PJ_Soul said:
    Here are the top 15 "space spin offs" - everyday technology that resulted directly from NASA's space exploration endeavors (there is plenty of non-everyday but important technology too obviously - many thousands of them):

    1. CAT scanner: this cancer-detecting technology was first used to find imperfections in space components.

    2. Computer microchip: modern microchips descend from integrated circuits used in the Apollo Guidance Computer.

    3. Cordless tools: power drills and vacuum cleaners use technology designed to drill for moon samples.

    4. Ear thermometer: a camera-like lens that detects infrared energy we feel as heat was originally used to monitor the birth of stars.

    5. Freeze-dried food: this reduces food weight and increases shelf life without sacrificing nutritional value.

    6. Insulation: home insulation uses reflective material that protects spacecraft from radiation.

    7. Invisible braces: teeth-straightening is less embarrassing thanks to transparent ceramic brace brackets made from spacecraft materials.

    8. Joystick: this computer gaming device was first used on the Apollo Lunar Rover.

    9. Memory foam: created for aircraft seats to soften landing, this foam, which returns to its original shape, is found in mattresses and shock absorbing helmets.

    10. Satellite television: technology used to fix errors in spacecraft signals helps reduce scrambled pictures and sound in satellite television signals.

    11. Scratch resistant lenses: astronaut helmet visor coating makes our spectacles ten times more scratch resistant.

    12. Shoe insoles: athletic shoe companies adapted space boot designs to lessen impact by adding spring and ventilation.

    13. Smoke detector: Nasa invented the first adjustable smoke detector with sensitivity levels to prevent false alarms.

    14. Swimsuit: Nasa used the same principles that reduce drag in space to help create the world’s fastest swimsuit for Speedo, rejected by some professionals for giving an unfair advantage.

    15. Water filter: domestic versions borrow a technique Nasa pioneered to kill bacteria in water taken into space.



    OH COME ON - NASA DID NOT INVENT FREEZE DRYING!

    People have been freeze drying food for centuries, for storage and travel. 

    That makes me suspicious about some of the other claims ;) 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    PJ_Soul said:
    Here are the top 15 "space spin offs" - everyday technology that resulted directly from NASA's space exploration endeavors (there is plenty of non-everyday but important technology too obviously - many thousands of them):

    1. CAT scanner: this cancer-detecting technology was first used to find imperfections in space components.

    2. Computer microchip: modern microchips descend from integrated circuits used in the Apollo Guidance Computer.

    3. Cordless tools: power drills and vacuum cleaners use technology designed to drill for moon samples.

    4. Ear thermometer: a camera-like lens that detects infrared energy we feel as heat was originally used to monitor the birth of stars.

    5. Freeze-dried food: this reduces food weight and increases shelf life without sacrificing nutritional value.

    6. Insulation: home insulation uses reflective material that protects spacecraft from radiation.

    7. Invisible braces: teeth-straightening is less embarrassing thanks to transparent ceramic brace brackets made from spacecraft materials.

    8. Joystick: this computer gaming device was first used on the Apollo Lunar Rover.

    9. Memory foam: created for aircraft seats to soften landing, this foam, which returns to its original shape, is found in mattresses and shock absorbing helmets.

    10. Satellite television: technology used to fix errors in spacecraft signals helps reduce scrambled pictures and sound in satellite television signals.

    11. Scratch resistant lenses: astronaut helmet visor coating makes our spectacles ten times more scratch resistant.

    12. Shoe insoles: athletic shoe companies adapted space boot designs to lessen impact by adding spring and ventilation.

    13. Smoke detector: Nasa invented the first adjustable smoke detector with sensitivity levels to prevent false alarms.

    14. Swimsuit: Nasa used the same principles that reduce drag in space to help create the world’s fastest swimsuit for Speedo, rejected by some professionals for giving an unfair advantage.

    15. Water filter: domestic versions borrow a technique Nasa pioneered to kill bacteria in water taken into space.



    OH COME ON - NASA DID NOT INVENT FREEZE DRYING!

    People have been freeze drying food for centuries, for storage and travel. 

    That makes me suspicious about some of the other claims ;) 
    Lol! That's true. I assume they meant the modern process, and/or the commercially viable stuff.

    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,312
    Going to the moon to stake a claim is the most human thing we could do, LMFAO...then that's the reason to stay away.  Humans are destroying this planet, and people want to go and destroy other planets...LOL

    Hell, we do not even completely understand the oceans, but let's spend oodles of money on a program that in 60 years has not gotten us any farther than the moon.
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 15,312
    Going to the moon to stake a claim is the most human thing we could do, LMFAO...then that's the reason to stay away.  Humans are destroying this planet, and people want to go and destroy other planets...LOL

    Hell, we do not even completely understand the oceans, but let's spend oodles of money on a program that in 60 years has not gotten us any farther than the moon.
    There have been plenty of unmanned flights that have gone way farther. Both Voyagers have reached interstellar space. There is nothing wrong with trying to understand where we came from.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 21,176
    Going to the moon to stake a claim is the most human thing we could do, LMFAO...then that's the reason to stay away.  Humans are destroying this planet, and people want to go and destroy other planets...LOL

    Hell, we do not even completely understand the oceans, but let's spend oodles of money on a program that in 60 years has not gotten us any farther than the moon.
    I'll have to google it but I could have sworn that all the countries got together and agreed that space was not open for any one country's claim?
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,804
    Going to the moon to stake a claim is the most human thing we could do, LMFAO...then that's the reason to stay away.  Humans are destroying this planet, and people want to go and destroy other planets...LOL

    Hell, we do not even completely understand the oceans, but let's spend oodles of money on a program that in 60 years has not gotten us any farther than the moon.
    I'll have to google it but I could have sworn that all the countries got together and agreed that space was not open for any one country's claim?
    correct:

    Who Owns The Moon? "According to the United Nations Outer Space Treaty, signed by every space-faring country, no nation can claim sovereignty over Earth's lunar satellite. 102 countries have entered into to the 1967 accord; China joined in 1983.
    12/29/19
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,804
    but leave it to the trump admin to realize such an agreement exists and decide they no longer want to be a part of it. 
    12/29/19
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,312
    Going to the moon to stake a claim is the most human thing we could do, LMFAO...then that's the reason to stay away.  Humans are destroying this planet, and people want to go and destroy other planets...LOL

    Hell, we do not even completely understand the oceans, but let's spend oodles of money on a program that in 60 years has not gotten us any farther than the moon.
    There have been plenty of unmanned flights that have gone way farther. Both Voyagers have reached interstellar space. There is nothing wrong with trying to understand where we came from.
    You claiming we came from space?  I'm talking manned missions.  A manned mission is a waste of money, space exploration is a huge waste of $$$ when planet earth needs some TLC.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,505
    Going to the moon to stake a claim is the most human thing we could do, LMFAO...then that's the reason to stay away.  Humans are destroying this planet, and people want to go and destroy other planets...LOL

    Hell, we do not even completely understand the oceans, but let's spend oodles of money on a program that in 60 years has not gotten us any farther than the moon.
    There have been plenty of unmanned flights that have gone way farther. Both Voyagers have reached interstellar space. There is nothing wrong with trying to understand where we came from.
    You claiming we came from space?  I'm talking manned missions.  A manned mission is a waste of money, space exploration is a huge waste of $$$ when planet earth needs some TLC.

    The whole planet "came from space", so in that sense we did too. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 15,312
    edited March 29
    Going to the moon to stake a claim is the most human thing we could do, LMFAO...then that's the reason to stay away.  Humans are destroying this planet, and people want to go and destroy other planets...LOL

    Hell, we do not even completely understand the oceans, but let's spend oodles of money on a program that in 60 years has not gotten us any farther than the moon.
    There have been plenty of unmanned flights that have gone way farther. Both Voyagers have reached interstellar space. There is nothing wrong with trying to understand where we came from.
    You claiming we came from space?  I'm talking manned missions.  A manned mission is a waste of money, space exploration is a huge waste of $$$ when planet earth needs some TLC.
    The origin of everything is space.  Is space exploration a waste of money vs say hundreds of billions on defense & weapons?  If planet earth needs some TLC, maybe focus your frustrations on all the money spent trying to destroy it.  Space exploration causes no harm.
  • jerparker20jerparker20 St. Paul, MNPosts: 1,653
    I’ve been reading a wonderful book on robotic planetary exploration, Interplanetary Robots by Ron Pyle. Easy read too. All the technical/physics info is very digestible, even for someone like myself who failed out of most of my math and science classes.

    another recommendation is Interstellar Age by Jim Bell. The book is all about the Voyager 1 and 2 missions. So far it has been the best book on the subject I have read. Also easy to read.
  • WobbieWobbie Posts: 25,542
    i would no more set foot in an Elon Musk rocket than I would set my hair on fire.
    If I had known then what I know now...

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  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    Going to the moon to stake a claim is the most human thing we could do, LMFAO...then that's the reason to stay away.  Humans are destroying this planet, and people want to go and destroy other planets...LOL

    Hell, we do not even completely understand the oceans, but let's spend oodles of money on a program that in 60 years has not gotten us any farther than the moon.
    There have been plenty of unmanned flights that have gone way farther. Both Voyagers have reached interstellar space. There is nothing wrong with trying to understand where we came from.
    You claiming we came from space?  I'm talking manned missions.  A manned mission is a waste of money, space exploration is a huge waste of $$$ when planet earth needs some TLC.
    The origin of everything is space.  Is space exploration a waste of money vs say hundreds of billions on defense & weapons?  If planet earth needs some TLC, maybe focus your frustrations on all the money spent trying to destroy it.  Space exploration causes no harm.
    Exactly, thank you for saying that!
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926

    The Event Horizon Telescope Is Trying to Take the First-Ever Photo of a Black Hole



    I am looking forward to this photo.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926
    edited April 8

    SpaceX's Starhopper Prototype for Starship Reaches End of Its Rope In Test Hop



    All went well. :)
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,926

    Can Robots Build a Moon Base for Astronauts? Japan Hopes to Find Out.



    If anyone can do it, the Japanese can.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
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