MLB 2019 Season

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Comments

  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,014
    Acuña is 7 homers and 12 stolen bases away from the 5th 40-40 season in MLB history. If he could maintain his pace after the all-star break, he would be a couple of stolen bases away from a 50-50 season.
    If he does the 50-50 thing he will forever be remembered.

    40-40 is nothing to slouch at too.  I thought Tatis might have a shot at that.

    Canseco, A-rod, Bonds and Soriano.All 4 should be in the HOF.  That is pretty good company right there.
  • markymark550markymark550 Columbia, SCPosts: 4,453
    Yeah, very good company. I hope he gets the 40-40, but as the season winds down I suspect he will see fewer and fewer pitches that he can drive. With the tear he's been on this month, I really don't see why pitchers would give him anything good at all. Granted, Albies and Freeman are hot as well, so I guess it's pick your poison until they cool off.
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 17,042
    Somehow Davis didn't get to 40-40.  My second all time favorite (not that I think he was the best, just loved to watch him do his thing in the 80s)
    https://www.mlb.com/news/eric-davis-put-up-video-game-stats-for-reds-c279109048

    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 5,972
    edited August 12
    Acuña is 7 homers and 12 stolen bases away from the 5th 40-40 season in MLB history. If he could maintain his pace after the all-star break, he would be a couple of stolen bases away from a 50-50 season.
    If he does the 50-50 thing he will forever be remembered.

    40-40 is nothing to slouch at too.  I thought Tatis might have a shot at that.

    Canseco, A-rod, Bonds and Soriano.All 4 should be in the HOF.  That is pretty good company right there.
    Good list of baseball athletes, terrible list of human beings. Also, is the only one on the list not linked to steroids Soriano or was he a usual suspect as well? Seems he became quite injury prone.
    Post edited by tbergs on
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • markymark550markymark550 Columbia, SCPosts: 4,453
    I don't think Soriano was linked to steroids. He wasn't listed in the Mitchell Report and never failed a drug test. I know that doesn't prove he was clean, just that there's no evidence that he did use steroids. Personally, I don't think he used them.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,014
    Somehow Davis didn't get to 40-40.  My second all time favorite (not that I think he was the best, just loved to watch him do his thing in the 80s)
    https://www.mlb.com/news/eric-davis-put-up-video-game-stats-for-reds-c279109048

    I never cared for Davis.  I do remember when this happened though.  Ray Knight and those Mets were some bad dudes!

  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 13,773
    Tribe... 
    Tribe 
    Tribe

    Carlos 2 nights in a row with a game winning dinger.
  • MayDay10MayDay10 Posts: 10,062
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 13,773
    MayDay10 said:
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
    He's our guy.  I hope he's with the club in some capacity forever.  Hell,  let him take Sandy's job at first when he's ready to retire.  It feels like it's been a 25 year string of Sandy to Carlos. 
  • pjhawkspjhawks Posts: 9,695
    MayDay10 said:
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
    he absolutely sucked for our Phillies last year.  kind of hard to believe the year he is having.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,014
    mrussel1 said:
    MayDay10 said:
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
    He's our guy.  I hope he's with the club in some capacity forever.  Hell,  let him take Sandy's job at first when he's ready to retire.  It feels like it's been a 25 year string of Sandy to Carlos. 
    He wasn't great on my fantasy team so I was curious to how his numbers are.

    His OPS is 100 points higher than anything he's done in the last 6 years.

    Impressive.
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 14,929
    Somehow Davis didn't get to 40-40.  My second all time favorite (not that I think he was the best, just loved to watch him do his thing in the 80s)
    https://www.mlb.com/news/eric-davis-put-up-video-game-stats-for-reds-c279109048

    Even more impressive I think is his comeback season in 96.  After all the injuries over the years, and battling cancer they year prior, to come back and put up the numbers he did, after basically 2 full seasons off, is nothing short of ridiculous.  As kids, we were fans of Davis for sure! A buddy of mine actually had his jersey.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 13,773
    pjhawks said:
    MayDay10 said:
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
    he absolutely sucked for our Phillies last year.  kind of hard to believe the year he is having.
    Yeah I don't think he was comfortable there.  Where you play makes a real difference for some players.  He's a perfect fit for this team and has been for years 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,014
    mrussel1 said:
    pjhawks said:
    MayDay10 said:
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
    he absolutely sucked for our Phillies last year.  kind of hard to believe the year he is having.
    Yeah I don't think he was comfortable there.  Where you play makes a real difference for some players.  He's a perfect fit for this team and has been for years 
    Aren't Philly fans brutal to their players sometimes?
  • pjhawkspjhawks Posts: 9,695
    mrussel1 said:
    pjhawks said:
    MayDay10 said:
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
    he absolutely sucked for our Phillies last year.  kind of hard to believe the year he is having.
    Yeah I don't think he was comfortable there.  Where you play makes a real difference for some players.  He's a perfect fit for this team and has been for years 
    Aren't Philly fans brutal to their players sometimes?
    only when they suck or dog it.  we can also be great to our players if they are the right guys with the right attitudes and perform.  tomorrow night Cole Hamels comes back to pitch in Philly for the 1st time as an opponent. I imagine he will get quite a warm welcome.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,014
    pjhawks said:
    mrussel1 said:
    pjhawks said:
    MayDay10 said:
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
    he absolutely sucked for our Phillies last year.  kind of hard to believe the year he is having.
    Yeah I don't think he was comfortable there.  Where you play makes a real difference for some players.  He's a perfect fit for this team and has been for years 
    Aren't Philly fans brutal to their players sometimes?
    only when they suck or dog it.  we can also be great to our players if they are the right guys with the right attitudes and perform.  tomorrow night Cole Hamels comes back to pitch in Philly for the 1st time as an opponent. I imagine he will get quite a warm welcome.
    Yanks and Mets fans can be brutal too.

    I remember attending a Mets game years ago and Bonilla fouled off a pitch and someone yelled "That's One Million!!!"

    I've been to Phillies games and the fans were great.  Seattle, great. Angels, great.

    The media coverage of players is bad here.  I know that makes players really uncomfortable.  Randy Johnson seemed like he hated EVERYONE when he was here, lol.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 13,773
    pjhawks said:
    mrussel1 said:
    pjhawks said:
    MayDay10 said:
    I remember feeling trepidation when they let Santana go last time.  I felt like he was a glue in the lockerroom and it always seemed like when they couldn't find a big hit from Lindor, Napoli, Kipnis, Chisenhall, etc, he would deliver it.

    Now, with that said, when they traded for him this offseason, I didnt imagine he would have a career season.
    he absolutely sucked for our Phillies last year.  kind of hard to believe the year he is having.
    Yeah I don't think he was comfortable there.  Where you play makes a real difference for some players.  He's a perfect fit for this team and has been for years 
    Aren't Philly fans brutal to their players sometimes?
    only when they suck or dog it.  we can also be great to our players if they are the right guys with the right attitudes and perform.  tomorrow night Cole Hamels comes back to pitch in Philly for the 1st time as an opponent. I imagine he will get quite a warm welcome.
    Yanks and Mets fans can be brutal too.

    I remember attending a Mets game years ago and Bonilla fouled off a pitch and someone yelled "That's One Million!!!"

    I've been to Phillies games and the fans were great.  Seattle, great. Angels, great.

    The media coverage of players is bad here.  I know that makes players really uncomfortable.  Randy Johnson seemed like he hated EVERYONE when he was here, lol.
    I think it's a NE thing,  but the Philly fans weren't terrible to him,  to my knowledge.  He played his whole career in Cleveland so it makes sense that he's comfortable there. 
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 5,972
    Dark horse AL MVP candidate; Rafael Devers. Snubbed from the All Star game and is currently 2nd in batting avg. and 1st in hits, RBIs and doubles. His defense needs work, but he just followed up a 6-6 night with 2 hits to start today's game. Not too bad for a 22 year old.

    My whole fantasy team is going off again today after getting 24 hits yesterday. I have 7 homers and 2 more on the bench.

    There is so much hitting talent this year. Best crop of players since the late 80's early 90's.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 13,773
    tbergs said:
    Dark horse AL MVP candidate; Rafael Devers. Snubbed from the All Star game and is currently 2nd in batting avg. and 1st in hits, RBIs and doubles. His defense needs work, but he just followed up a 6-6 night with 2 hits to start today's game. Not too bad for a 22 year old.

    My whole fantasy team is going off again today after getting 24 hits yesterday. I have 7 homers and 2 more on the bench.

    There is so much hitting talent this year. Best crop of players since the late 80's early 90's.
    He fucking killed us in the last 36 hours. 
  • cutzcutz Posts: 8,278
    I know this isn't MLB, but i thought i'd post it here:  https://www.boston.com/sports/local-news/2019/08/13/new-hampshire-rhode-island-little-league-world-series-sign-stealing-allegation

    Manager of N.H. team alleges Little League World Series-bound R.I. champions stole signs

    "You can do that in big league ball, but in Little League it’s unsportsmanlike, it’s dishonorable, and it’s disgusting."

    By Christopher Gavin  updated at 4:49 PM

     When the Barrington, Rhode Island, Little League state champions beat out their opponents from Goffstown, New Hampshire, Saturday to clear their way to the World Series, Pat Dutton knew his team’s loss came in part from a sub-par performance.

     The New Hampshire all-star team gave up an early lead after Barrington worked each pitch, forcing the Goffstown Junior Baseball pitcher to burn through 82 of them in the first three-and-one-third innings.

    But there was another factor in play during Barrington’s 6-4 win, Dutton alleges.

    He claims the opposing team stole signs during both games of the series in Bristol, Connecticut, where Barrington was crowned the New England Region champions.

     The team is slated to take the field Thursday in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, at the Little League World Series.

    “You can see (runners on second base) leaning in, looking in and they’re doing hand gestures to their kid (at the plate) indicating what kind of pitch it is and where it’s located,” Dutton told The New Hampshire Union Leader. “You can do that in big league ball, but in Little League it’s unsportsmanlike, it’s dishonorable, and it’s disgusting. They did it the whole tournament and got away with it, and now that’s what’s representing New England in the Little League World Series. It’s just a bad look.”

    In a statement to Boston.com Tuesday, Barrington Little League denied the allegations, saying, “The article in the Union Leader is unfortunate, and its premise false.”

    “We hold our coaches, players and teams to the highest standards, and do not coach or condone unsportsmanlike behavior of any kind,” the statement says.

    Stealing signs is a longstanding, but largely condemned, practice in baseball.

    Still, peering at gestures from catchers and coaches to tip off a batter at the plate is very much a tradition in Major League Baseball, dating back through decades of professional play and evolving in each generation with new technology.

     It’s so common, the big leagues do not have a rule against it.

    In Little League, however, the rules are clear: Stealing and relaying signs is strictly prohibited.

    Should one find the practice occurring, umpires are to eject the involved players and coaches from the game, according to the league’s official regulations.

    Dutton alleges he first saw Barrington stealing signs during a game against Goffstown — who ultimately won — on Aug. 8, according to the Union Leader. He brought it to the attention of the home plate umpire during that game and when he saw it again on Saturday, he said.

    After that, Barrington did it again on the next pitch, according to Dutton. The umpire then issued warnings to the player and team manager, although they were not ejected, he told the newspaper.

    In a video of the game, a runner on second base can be seen making a gesture with his hands toward the batter during the top of the third inning. The umpire then calls a time out and speaks with both managers before the game resumes.

    Dutton said he decided not to push the issue the rest of the game. It was unlikely that doing so would have changed Goffstown’s loss, he said.

    “It’s just frustrating to see teams and kids having to go about it that way when clearly they were playing better than we were,” he told the Union Leader. “They didn’t have to do that. That’s something these kids don’t learn on their own. That’s something that they’re taught. They’re coached to do that.

     “Obviously the team condones it, they coach it, and, personally, that’s something that I’m completely against,” he added. “Little League is supposedly against it, but you wouldn’t know it this week.”

    In its statement, Barrington Little League said the organization “prides itself on adherence to Little League rules and values.”

    “In all aspects of our organization, we strive to foster the ideals of good sportsmanship, honesty, loyalty and respect for coaches, officials and teammates. The article in the Union Leader is unfortunate, and its premise false. We hold our coaches, players and teams to the highest standards, and do not coach or condone unsportsmanlike behavior of any kind.

    “Likewise, we do not condone anyone making disparaging comments about opposing teams, particularly teams like Barrington’s All-Star team, a team made up of dedicated volunteer coaches and 13 exceptional young players. That goes against our core values, and is, in fact, a violation of the rules and spirit of Little League itself. If an opposing team or manager has any concerns, they should take them up with Little League. We are extremely proud of our team and wish them well in Williamsport.”

    In an email Tuesday, Paul Matatall, president of Goffstown Junior Baseball, said the group’s board members and coaching staff would not comment further regarding the incident.

    New Hampshire District One, the local Little League management authority, and Little League’s East Region did not immediately return requests for comment Tuesday afternoon.

    Barrington’s advancement to the World Series is a first in program history, according to the organization’s website. Last month, the team beat out Cranston West to secure the Rhode Island state championship title.

    On Thursday, Barrington will take on the Southeast Region champion from Virginia at 3 p.m. ESPN will broadcast the game.

    Update: In a statement Wednesday, Little League International said it “has full confidence that the umpires and tournament officials handled this situation appropriately” and “considers this issue closed.”

    “In response to the accusations that have been made against Barrington Little League at the New England Region Tournament, Little League International has full confidence that the umpires and tournament officials handled this situation appropriately. It is under the judgement of the umpire to decide if unsportsmanlike behavior, including stealing or relaying signs, has taken place. If so, the penalty is ejection and a one-game suspension for those involved. The Little League International Tournament Committee considers this issue closed and has stressed to the teams in Williamsport the importance of adherence to all rules and regulations governing the Little League Baseball World Series.”
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,014
    cutz said:
    I know this isn't MLB, but i thought i'd post it here:  https://www.boston.com/sports/local-news/2019/08/13/new-hampshire-rhode-island-little-league-world-series-sign-stealing-allegation

    Manager of N.H. team alleges Little League World Series-bound R.I. champions stole signs

    "You can do that in big league ball, but in Little League it’s unsportsmanlike, it’s dishonorable, and it’s disgusting."

    By Christopher Gavin  updated at 4:49 PM

     When the Barrington, Rhode Island, Little League state champions beat out their opponents from Goffstown, New Hampshire, Saturday to clear their way to the World Series, Pat Dutton knew his team’s loss came in part from a sub-par performance.

     The New Hampshire all-star team gave up an early lead after Barrington worked each pitch, forcing the Goffstown Junior Baseball pitcher to burn through 82 of them in the first three-and-one-third innings.

    But there was another factor in play during Barrington’s 6-4 win, Dutton alleges.

    He claims the opposing team stole signs during both games of the series in Bristol, Connecticut, where Barrington was crowned the New England Region champions.

     The team is slated to take the field Thursday in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, at the Little League World Series.

    “You can see (runners on second base) leaning in, looking in and they’re doing hand gestures to their kid (at the plate) indicating what kind of pitch it is and where it’s located,” Dutton told The New Hampshire Union Leader. “You can do that in big league ball, but in Little League it’s unsportsmanlike, it’s dishonorable, and it’s disgusting. They did it the whole tournament and got away with it, and now that’s what’s representing New England in the Little League World Series. It’s just a bad look.”

    In a statement to Boston.com Tuesday, Barrington Little League denied the allegations, saying, “The article in the Union Leader is unfortunate, and its premise false.”

    “We hold our coaches, players and teams to the highest standards, and do not coach or condone unsportsmanlike behavior of any kind,” the statement says.

    Stealing signs is a longstanding, but largely condemned, practice in baseball.

    Still, peering at gestures from catchers and coaches to tip off a batter at the plate is very much a tradition in Major League Baseball, dating back through decades of professional play and evolving in each generation with new technology.

     It’s so common, the big leagues do not have a rule against it.

    In Little League, however, the rules are clear: Stealing and relaying signs is strictly prohibited.

    Should one find the practice occurring, umpires are to eject the involved players and coaches from the game, according to the league’s official regulations.

    Dutton alleges he first saw Barrington stealing signs during a game against Goffstown — who ultimately won — on Aug. 8, according to the Union Leader. He brought it to the attention of the home plate umpire during that game and when he saw it again on Saturday, he said.

    After that, Barrington did it again on the next pitch, according to Dutton. The umpire then issued warnings to the player and team manager, although they were not ejected, he told the newspaper.

    In a video of the game, a runner on second base can be seen making a gesture with his hands toward the batter during the top of the third inning. The umpire then calls a time out and speaks with both managers before the game resumes.

    Dutton said he decided not to push the issue the rest of the game. It was unlikely that doing so would have changed Goffstown’s loss, he said.

    “It’s just frustrating to see teams and kids having to go about it that way when clearly they were playing better than we were,” he told the Union Leader. “They didn’t have to do that. That’s something these kids don’t learn on their own. That’s something that they’re taught. They’re coached to do that.

     “Obviously the team condones it, they coach it, and, personally, that’s something that I’m completely against,” he added. “Little League is supposedly against it, but you wouldn’t know it this week.”

    In its statement, Barrington Little League said the organization “prides itself on adherence to Little League rules and values.”

    “In all aspects of our organization, we strive to foster the ideals of good sportsmanship, honesty, loyalty and respect for coaches, officials and teammates. The article in the Union Leader is unfortunate, and its premise false. We hold our coaches, players and teams to the highest standards, and do not coach or condone unsportsmanlike behavior of any kind.

    “Likewise, we do not condone anyone making disparaging comments about opposing teams, particularly teams like Barrington’s All-Star team, a team made up of dedicated volunteer coaches and 13 exceptional young players. That goes against our core values, and is, in fact, a violation of the rules and spirit of Little League itself. If an opposing team or manager has any concerns, they should take them up with Little League. We are extremely proud of our team and wish them well in Williamsport.”

    In an email Tuesday, Paul Matatall, president of Goffstown Junior Baseball, said the group’s board members and coaching staff would not comment further regarding the incident.

    New Hampshire District One, the local Little League management authority, and Little League’s East Region did not immediately return requests for comment Tuesday afternoon.

    Barrington’s advancement to the World Series is a first in program history, according to the organization’s website. Last month, the team beat out Cranston West to secure the Rhode Island state championship title.

    On Thursday, Barrington will take on the Southeast Region champion from Virginia at 3 p.m. ESPN will broadcast the game.

    Update: In a statement Wednesday, Little League International said it “has full confidence that the umpires and tournament officials handled this situation appropriately” and “considers this issue closed.”

    “In response to the accusations that have been made against Barrington Little League at the New England Region Tournament, Little League International has full confidence that the umpires and tournament officials handled this situation appropriately. It is under the judgement of the umpire to decide if unsportsmanlike behavior, including stealing or relaying signs, has taken place. If so, the penalty is ejection and a one-game suspension for those involved. The Little League International Tournament Committee considers this issue closed and has stressed to the teams in Williamsport the importance of adherence to all rules and regulations governing the Little League Baseball World Series.”
    Stealing signs is part of baseball.  Figure out another way if you don't want that happening.

    It's silly to think that people aren't going to look.

    Dumb rule in LL.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 20,014
    tbergs said:
    Dark horse AL MVP candidate; Rafael Devers. Snubbed from the All Star game and is currently 2nd in batting avg. and 1st in hits, RBIs and doubles. His defense needs work, but he just followed up a 6-6 night with 2 hits to start today's game. Not too bad for a 22 year old.

    My whole fantasy team is going off again today after getting 24 hits yesterday. I have 7 homers and 2 more on the bench.

    There is so much hitting talent this year. Best crop of players since the late 80's early 90's.
    Devers is a fave of mine.  I thought he got lost in a team of stars last year.  He is only going to get better.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 13,773
    cutz said:
    I know this isn't MLB, but i thought i'd post it here:  https://www.boston.com/sports/local-news/2019/08/13/new-hampshire-rhode-island-little-league-world-series-sign-stealing-allegation

    Manager of N.H. team alleges Little League World Series-bound R.I. champions stole signs

    "You can do that in big league ball, but in Little League it’s unsportsmanlike, it’s dishonorable, and it’s disgusting."

    By Christopher Gavin  updated at 4:49 PM

     When the Barrington, Rhode Island, Little League state champions beat out their opponents from Goffstown, New Hampshire, Saturday to clear their way to the World Series, Pat Dutton knew his team’s loss came in part from a sub-par performance.

     The New Hampshire all-star team gave up an early lead after Barrington worked each pitch, forcing the Goffstown Junior Baseball pitcher to burn through 82 of them in the first three-and-one-third innings.

    But there was another factor in play during Barrington’s 6-4 win, Dutton alleges.

    He claims the opposing team stole signs during both games of the series in Bristol, Connecticut, where Barrington was crowned the New England Region champions.

     The team is slated to take the field Thursday in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, at the Little League World Series.

    “You can see (runners on second base) leaning in, looking in and they’re doing hand gestures to their kid (at the plate) indicating what kind of pitch it is and where it’s located,” Dutton told The New Hampshire Union Leader. “You can do that in big league ball, but in Little League it’s unsportsmanlike, it’s dishonorable, and it’s disgusting. They did it the whole tournament and got away with it, and now that’s what’s representing New England in the Little League World Series. It’s just a bad look.”

    In a statement to Boston.com Tuesday, Barrington Little League denied the allegations, saying, “The article in the Union Leader is unfortunate, and its premise false.”

    “We hold our coaches, players and teams to the highest standards, and do not coach or condone unsportsmanlike behavior of any kind,” the statement says.

    Stealing signs is a longstanding, but largely condemned, practice in baseball.

    Still, peering at gestures from catchers and coaches to tip off a batter at the plate is very much a tradition in Major League Baseball, dating back through decades of professional play and evolving in each generation with new technology.

     It’s so common, the big leagues do not have a rule against it.

    In Little League, however, the rules are clear: Stealing and relaying signs is strictly prohibited.

    Should one find the practice occurring, umpires are to eject the involved players and coaches from the game, according to the league’s official regulations.

    Dutton alleges he first saw Barrington stealing signs during a game against Goffstown — who ultimately won — on Aug. 8, according to the Union Leader. He brought it to the attention of the home plate umpire during that game and when he saw it again on Saturday, he said.

    After that, Barrington did it again on the next pitch, according to Dutton. The umpire then issued warnings to the player and team manager, although they were not ejected, he told the newspaper.

    In a video of the game, a runner on second base can be seen making a gesture with his hands toward the batter during the top of the third inning. The umpire then calls a time out and speaks with both managers before the game resumes.

    Dutton said he decided not to push the issue the rest of the game. It was unlikely that doing so would have changed Goffstown’s loss, he said.

    “It’s just frustrating to see teams and kids having to go about it that way when clearly they were playing better than we were,” he told the Union Leader. “They didn’t have to do that. That’s something these kids don’t learn on their own. That’s something that they’re taught. They’re coached to do that.

     “Obviously the team condones it, they coach it, and, personally, that’s something that I’m completely against,” he added. “Little League is supposedly against it, but you wouldn’t know it this week.”

    In its statement, Barrington Little League said the organization “prides itself on adherence to Little League rules and values.”

    “In all aspects of our organization, we strive to foster the ideals of good sportsmanship, honesty, loyalty and respect for coaches, officials and teammates. The article in the Union Leader is unfortunate, and its premise false. We hold our coaches, players and teams to the highest standards, and do not coach or condone unsportsmanlike behavior of any kind.

    “Likewise, we do not condone anyone making disparaging comments about opposing teams, particularly teams like Barrington’s All-Star team, a team made up of dedicated volunteer coaches and 13 exceptional young players. That goes against our core values, and is, in fact, a violation of the rules and spirit of Little League itself. If an opposing team or manager has any concerns, they should take them up with Little League. We are extremely proud of our team and wish them well in Williamsport.”

    In an email Tuesday, Paul Matatall, president of Goffstown Junior Baseball, said the group’s board members and coaching staff would not comment further regarding the incident.

    New Hampshire District One, the local Little League management authority, and Little League’s East Region did not immediately return requests for comment Tuesday afternoon.

    Barrington’s advancement to the World Series is a first in program history, according to the organization’s website. Last month, the team beat out Cranston West to secure the Rhode Island state championship title.

    On Thursday, Barrington will take on the Southeast Region champion from Virginia at 3 p.m. ESPN will broadcast the game.

    Update: In a statement Wednesday, Little League International said it “has full confidence that the umpires and tournament officials handled this situation appropriately” and “considers this issue closed.”

    “In response to the accusations that have been made against Barrington Little League at the New England Region Tournament, Little League International has full confidence that the umpires and tournament officials handled this situation appropriately. It is under the judgement of the umpire to decide if unsportsmanlike behavior, including stealing or relaying signs, has taken place. If so, the penalty is ejection and a one-game suspension for those involved. The Little League International Tournament Committee considers this issue closed and has stressed to the teams in Williamsport the importance of adherence to all rules and regulations governing the Little League Baseball World Series.”
    Stealing signs is part of baseball.  Figure out another way if you don't want that happening.

    It's silly to think that people aren't going to look.

    Dumb rule in LL.
    It's not the same game as the pros,  nor should it be.  If a coach is teaching to steal signs,  that's pretty low.  
  • MayDay10MayDay10 Posts: 10,062
    edited August 15
    I disagree that it is 'disgusting'

    We had a team that came very close to getting into the LLWS.  The games were very well played and everyone was aware that the stakes were high and it was extremely competitive.  It was well beyond just a bunch of kids playing for fun.  Our catcher would get the signs from the dugout and would have multiple signals in the event of someone trying to steal the signs.  Signs were also given for location.

    12 Year olds with an operable breaking ball is fairly rare (and actually the reason we got eliminated was we ran into a curve ball pitcher who ended up in MLB for a long time).  For one, they havent been pitching that long to develop such a pitch, and nobody in their right mind is teaching a 9 year old a curveball. Second, the distance, 46 feet or whatever, isnt much of a runway for a breaking ball.  It is all about throwing fire and location.


    Also, this sour grapes, bad-example coach is claiming that this was happening all tournament....  by the championship game (and allegedly 82 pitches in), he decides to do something about it and loudly complain?  I see the umpire is supposed to kick a player out for stealing signs.  Why wouldnt the coach alert the umpire?
    Post edited by MayDay10 on
  • Cliffy6745Cliffy6745 Posts: 29,027
    Yo, Bill Walton is on the white Sox broadcast and it is amazing and insane, especially after a bowl 
  • Cliffy6745Cliffy6745 Posts: 29,027
    I cannot stress this enough, this is insane. 
  • Cliffy6745Cliffy6745 Posts: 29,027
    “If you’re ever feeling down in life, just put on John Fogerty”

    most definitely the first time this has been said on a white Sox broadcast 
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