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More affordable Mike McCready 60's Strat

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    Jason PJason P Posts: 19,129
    What did the tech use to darken the wood?  Just curious.  The one I got seems darker or "aged" more than the pics you posted.

    I agree that the brown fret markers are NOT ideal for the aging guitarist!  I've briefly pondered doing something to make them more visible but i'm too lazy to make probably an unnecessary mod.
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    gimmesometruth27gimmesometruth27 St. Fuckin Louis Posts: 22,353
    Jason P said:
    What did the tech use to darken the wood?  Just curious.  The one I got seems darker or "aged" more than the pics you posted.

    I agree that the brown fret markers are NOT ideal for the aging guitarist!  I've briefly pondered doing something to make them more visible but i'm too lazy to make probably an unnecessary mod.
    he wouldn't tell me what he used. he said it is a "wood dye" that he mixes himself that he can lighten if he needs to. he said sometimes when building a guitar he dyes the exposed wood too dark or unevenly and he is able to put something else on there to make it not as dark. i am not sure how that works, because to me it would seem that once the wood grain in darkened it will stay that way. i will try to find out from him.

    all those people that build relic guitars have their own way of aging them. i know there are several ways to age the hardware and the method used depends on which part you are trying to age. i am sure there are several ways to darken the body. i read one time that one builder uses a wet black leather belt and rubs that into the wood to have the dye go into the wood grain to simulate color change from the sleeve a black leather jacket that people used to wear in the 70s and 80s. 

    you had one of the first runs, correct? maybe they were doing more to age those in the factory. 

    he told me that you can use nail polish on the fret markers. he said this does not damage the guitar, and if you don't like it you can use a fingernail to scrape the nail polish off. i was thinking about trying that with some bright white nail polish. just put a small dot on those top fret dots.

    he said if i bring that guitar back he can check the finish on the body for me. he said it would take several days. i don't know if i want to go all that way again just for him to check the body. its a 55  minute drive one way. 
    There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.- Hemingway

    "Well, you tell him that I don't talk to suckas."
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    matt3846matt3846 Atlanta Posts: 156
    Just noticed that the ones built more recently say Made In Ensenada on the headstock instead of Made In Mexico…


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    gimmesometruth27gimmesometruth27 St. Fuckin Louis Posts: 22,353
    matt3846 said:
    Just noticed that the ones built more recently say Made In Ensenada on the headstock instead of Made In Mexico…


    i noticed that. i wonder how they determined which ones got that stamp? when i bought mine 3 of the 5 i looked at had made in mexico. i thought all 5 were from the same run though.
    There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.- Hemingway

    "Well, you tell him that I don't talk to suckas."
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    Jason PJason P Posts: 19,129
    “A made in Mexico Fender that costs $1900, are you nuts???”

    vs

    ”Oh, this was hand-crafted by luthiers in Ensenada.   Ooh, La La”

    Marketing gimmick.  Like when Taylor Guitars started using pallet lumber to make guitars but called it “Urban Ash”
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