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Define Classic Rock

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  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 8,119
    edited January 4
    My definition of classic rock:  I think it’s now more of a sound than a time period.  
    Very southern influenced guitars (traced to a blues background).  Maybe just any traditional rock band in the future.  

    Rock in general won’t go away but the pop punk blend is always listenable and way more top 40 these days.  Willow and Olivia Rodriguez both owe a lot to Paramore who owed a lot to blink/Sunny day/ greenday and 100 other bands who owed a lot to the Replacements.  And so on.  There’s nothing original about Willow or Rodriguez for sure but it has guitars and drums at least.    
    Post edited by cp3iverson on
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 30,031
    My definition of classic rock:  I think it’s now more of a sound than a time period.  
    Very southern influenced guitars (traced to a blues background).  Maybe just any traditional rock band in the future.  

    Rock in general won’t go away but the pop punk blend is always listenable and way more top 40 these days.  Willow and Olivia Rodriguez both owe a lot to Paramore who owed a lot to blink/Sunny day/ greenday and 100 other bands who owed a lot to the Replacements.  And so on.  There’s nothing original about Willow or Rodriguez for sure but it has guitars and drums at least.    
    Teeny bopper titilating music will always be here unfortunately.  That is a form of music that will always have an audience for good or bad.

    I do miss bad ass punk girls though.  Spit Boy was one of hem.  Check them out!!!
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 30,031
    edited January 4
    I went internettin and found that they are releasing a complete discography.

    If you are so inclined check them out.  They were before the riot grrrl stuff and feminist's before that was a thing.  
    https://dongiovannirecords.limitedrun.com/products/698205

    Now if Slant 6 would re release Inzombia...
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 23,974
    Classic rock is the first generation of rock, when the Beatles started doing drugs, until roughly 1980.  That's how I think of it.  So basically 1966-1980.  Certainly some bands that were in both generations are still classic rock (Petty, Floyd, Stones, etc.), but I don't consider bands that started after 1980 as being classic rock bands.  
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 36,174
    edited January 4
    Though we're mostly talking about classic rock here, we seem to touch on something that comes up often: What is in store for the future for music?  I think about this a lot and mostly out of frustration because I am of a generation that lucked out and lived through several huge transitions in pop and rock music- from very early rock and roll and pop, to early 60's folk explosion, to 60's rock, blues rock, hard rock, psychedelia, prog, jazz/rock fusion, disco, New York CBGB scene, early punk, punk, new wave,  hardcore, metal, paisley underground, indi/college rock, grunge, rap (and whatever else I've missed)- not all favorite genres, but all adding something to the stew that has been popular music for the last several decades.
    What I question though is, are we (or am I) expecting too much in wanting to see yet another big change in music?  Music never evolved this quickly until the modern era.  It followed the same trajectory as rapid development of technology and population.  Add to that our world-wide rapid communications with so much information being shared so quickly and broadly, it becomes very difficult to come up with new formulas.

    Think about it- when is the last time a truly new form of popular (or even not-so-popular) music evolved?  Have we possibly hit a wall, mined all the possibilities, run out of new ideas?  What would it take to create a truly new form of music?  Newly created musical instruments?  New ways to alter sound waves? Finding new sounds never heard before?  Increasing the ability of humans to hear a broader spectrum of sound waves?  New drugs?  I really don't have a clue, but seeing how little the needle has moved in the last two decades compared to the last half of the 20th  century, I don't hold out much hope anymore for seeing anything truly new to coming to music.
    And I sincerely hope I am wrong.

    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 23,974
    brianlux said:
    Though we're mostly talking about classic rock here, we seem to touch on something that comes up often: What is in store for the future for music?  I think about this a lot and mostly out of frustration because I am of a generation that lucked out and lived through several huge transitions in pop and rock music- from very early rock and roll and pop, to early 60's folk explosion, to 60's rock, blues rock, hard rock, psychedelia, prog, jazz/rock fusion, disco, New York CBGB scene, early punk, punk, new wave,  hardcore, metal, paisley underground, indi/college rock, grunge, rap (and whatever else I've missed)- not all favorite genres, but all adding something to the stew that has been popular music for the last several decades.
    What I question though is, are we (or am I) expecting too much in wanting to see yet another big change in music?  Music never evolved this quickly until the modern era.  It followed the same trajectory as rapid development of technology and population.  Add to that our world-wide rapid communications with so much information being shared so quickly and broadly, it becomes very difficult to come up with new formulas.

    Think about it- when is the last time a truly new form of popular (or even not-so-popular) music evolved?  Have we possibly hit a wall, mined all the possibilities, run out of new ideas?  What would it take to create a truly new form of music?  Newly created musical instruments?  New ways to alter sound waves? Finding new sounds never heard before?  Increasing the ability of humans to hear a broader spectrum of sound waves?  New drugs?  I really don't have a clue, but seeing how little the needle has moved in the last two decades compared to the last half of the 20th  century, I don't hold out much hope anymore for seeing anything truly new to coming to music.
    And I sincerely hope I am wrong.

    New drugs... we definitely need new drugs. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 36,174
    mrussel1 said:
    brianlux said:
    Though we're mostly talking about classic rock here, we seem to touch on something that comes up often: What is in store for the future for music?  I think about this a lot and mostly out of frustration because I am of a generation that lucked out and lived through several huge transitions in pop and rock music- from very early rock and roll and pop, to early 60's folk explosion, to 60's rock, blues rock, hard rock, psychedelia, prog, jazz/rock fusion, disco, New York CBGB scene, early punk, punk, new wave,  hardcore, metal, paisley underground, indi/college rock, grunge, rap (and whatever else I've missed)- not all favorite genres, but all adding something to the stew that has been popular music for the last several decades.
    What I question though is, are we (or am I) expecting too much in wanting to see yet another big change in music?  Music never evolved this quickly until the modern era.  It followed the same trajectory as rapid development of technology and population.  Add to that our world-wide rapid communications with so much information being shared so quickly and broadly, it becomes very difficult to come up with new formulas.

    Think about it- when is the last time a truly new form of popular (or even not-so-popular) music evolved?  Have we possibly hit a wall, mined all the possibilities, run out of new ideas?  What would it take to create a truly new form of music?  Newly created musical instruments?  New ways to alter sound waves? Finding new sounds never heard before?  Increasing the ability of humans to hear a broader spectrum of sound waves?  New drugs?  I really don't have a clue, but seeing how little the needle has moved in the last two decades compared to the last half of the 20th  century, I don't hold out much hope anymore for seeing anything truly new to coming to music.
    And I sincerely hope I am wrong.

    New drugs... we definitely need new drugs. 

    LOL. 
    Seriously though, I would love it if there was a psychedelic drug that left no unwanted side affects and was not addicting.  My few experiences with them were unpleasant.  My one adventure with opiated hashish sprinkled in a joint was heavenly but thankfully not readily available- way too addicting.
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 30,031
    Brian and I have discussed about when is the new music boom going to happen?  Every 30 years or so something happens.  Last time was the 90's so we are due for something.  We had that blip w the Hipster/Brooklyn revival but I don't think it was big enough.  We need something that invades everywhere...

    Ahhhh, one can hope it comes soon.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 30,031
    mrussel1 said:
    brianlux said:
    Though we're mostly talking about classic rock here, we seem to touch on something that comes up often: What is in store for the future for music?  I think about this a lot and mostly out of frustration because I am of a generation that lucked out and lived through several huge transitions in pop and rock music- from very early rock and roll and pop, to early 60's folk explosion, to 60's rock, blues rock, hard rock, psychedelia, prog, jazz/rock fusion, disco, New York CBGB scene, early punk, punk, new wave,  hardcore, metal, paisley underground, indi/college rock, grunge, rap (and whatever else I've missed)- not all favorite genres, but all adding something to the stew that has been popular music for the last several decades.
    What I question though is, are we (or am I) expecting too much in wanting to see yet another big change in music?  Music never evolved this quickly until the modern era.  It followed the same trajectory as rapid development of technology and population.  Add to that our world-wide rapid communications with so much information being shared so quickly and broadly, it becomes very difficult to come up with new formulas.

    Think about it- when is the last time a truly new form of popular (or even not-so-popular) music evolved?  Have we possibly hit a wall, mined all the possibilities, run out of new ideas?  What would it take to create a truly new form of music?  Newly created musical instruments?  New ways to alter sound waves? Finding new sounds never heard before?  Increasing the ability of humans to hear a broader spectrum of sound waves?  New drugs?  I really don't have a clue, but seeing how little the needle has moved in the last two decades compared to the last half of the 20th  century, I don't hold out much hope anymore for seeing anything truly new to coming to music.
    And I sincerely hope I am wrong.

    New drugs... we definitely need new drugs. 
    Huey Lewis has been screaming about that shit for years...

    We did get fentanyl.  Does that count?
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 29,307
    mrussel1 said:
    brianlux said:
    Though we're mostly talking about classic rock here, we seem to touch on something that comes up often: What is in store for the future for music?  I think about this a lot and mostly out of frustration because I am of a generation that lucked out and lived through several huge transitions in pop and rock music- from very early rock and roll and pop, to early 60's folk explosion, to 60's rock, blues rock, hard rock, psychedelia, prog, jazz/rock fusion, disco, New York CBGB scene, early punk, punk, new wave,  hardcore, metal, paisley underground, indi/college rock, grunge, rap (and whatever else I've missed)- not all favorite genres, but all adding something to the stew that has been popular music for the last several decades.
    What I question though is, are we (or am I) expecting too much in wanting to see yet another big change in music?  Music never evolved this quickly until the modern era.  It followed the same trajectory as rapid development of technology and population.  Add to that our world-wide rapid communications with so much information being shared so quickly and broadly, it becomes very difficult to come up with new formulas.

    Think about it- when is the last time a truly new form of popular (or even not-so-popular) music evolved?  Have we possibly hit a wall, mined all the possibilities, run out of new ideas?  What would it take to create a truly new form of music?  Newly created musical instruments?  New ways to alter sound waves? Finding new sounds never heard before?  Increasing the ability of humans to hear a broader spectrum of sound waves?  New drugs?  I really don't have a clue, but seeing how little the needle has moved in the last two decades compared to the last half of the 20th  century, I don't hold out much hope anymore for seeing anything truly new to coming to music.
    And I sincerely hope I am wrong.

    New drugs... we definitely need new drugs. 
    Huey Lewis has been screaming about that shit for years...

    We did get fentanyl.  Does that count?
    "hey, we got a record deal!"
    "too bad half the band is dead"
    ....courage is fear that just said its prayers....


  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 30,031
    mrussel1 said:
    brianlux said:
    Though we're mostly talking about classic rock here, we seem to touch on something that comes up often: What is in store for the future for music?  I think about this a lot and mostly out of frustration because I am of a generation that lucked out and lived through several huge transitions in pop and rock music- from very early rock and roll and pop, to early 60's folk explosion, to 60's rock, blues rock, hard rock, psychedelia, prog, jazz/rock fusion, disco, New York CBGB scene, early punk, punk, new wave,  hardcore, metal, paisley underground, indi/college rock, grunge, rap (and whatever else I've missed)- not all favorite genres, but all adding something to the stew that has been popular music for the last several decades.
    What I question though is, are we (or am I) expecting too much in wanting to see yet another big change in music?  Music never evolved this quickly until the modern era.  It followed the same trajectory as rapid development of technology and population.  Add to that our world-wide rapid communications with so much information being shared so quickly and broadly, it becomes very difficult to come up with new formulas.

    Think about it- when is the last time a truly new form of popular (or even not-so-popular) music evolved?  Have we possibly hit a wall, mined all the possibilities, run out of new ideas?  What would it take to create a truly new form of music?  Newly created musical instruments?  New ways to alter sound waves? Finding new sounds never heard before?  Increasing the ability of humans to hear a broader spectrum of sound waves?  New drugs?  I really don't have a clue, but seeing how little the needle has moved in the last two decades compared to the last half of the 20th  century, I don't hold out much hope anymore for seeing anything truly new to coming to music.
    And I sincerely hope I am wrong.

    New drugs... we definitely need new drugs. 
    Huey Lewis has been screaming about that shit for years...

    We did get fentanyl.  Does that count?
    "hey, we got a record deal!"
    "too bad half the band is dead"
    Not funny but funny!
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 30,031
    This was a fun discussion if anyone feels like picking it back up.


  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 36,174
    I'm kind of biased against the term "Classic Rock" because, as much as I like a lot of the music, I get the sense that it is a two-word definition for this concept:  "Popular songs from albums that get played on radio while all the other music made by the artist is ignored".  For example, "Purple Haze", a great Hendrix song, would get plenty of air play, but I've never heard his marvelous "One Rainy Wish" aired.  Or Jefferson's "White Rabbit" is played millions of times, but never "3/5 of a Mile in 10 Seconds".   So I guess I think of "Classic Rock" as a limited, "hits only" kind of music.
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 30,031
    brianlux said:
    I'm kind of biased against the term "Classic Rock" because, as much as I like a lot of the music, I get the sense that it is a two-word definition for this concept:  "Popular songs from albums that get played on radio while all the other music made by the artist is ignored".  For example, "Purple Haze", a great Hendrix song, would get plenty of air play, but I've never heard his marvelous "One Rainy Wish" aired.  Or Jefferson's "White Rabbit" is played millions of times, but never "3/5 of a Mile in 10 Seconds".   So I guess I think of "Classic Rock" as a limited, "hits only" kind of music.
    That is radio spoon feeding you the music because they have the math figured out on what people generally want to hear.

    You think I want to hear friggin Jeremy and Black all the time?  No, play all those yesterdays and Of the Girl.

    Also I would like to add that one day whilst driving I heard these awesome guitar riffs on the radio.  Was wondering what 90's Seattle band this was.  DJ gets on and says that was Jimmi Hendrix and this show is "so you think you know Jimmi?"

    No idea what song it was but they played things I never knew existed because I never really listened to Hendrix.  I was blown away.
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 29,307
    brianlux said:
    I'm kind of biased against the term "Classic Rock" because, as much as I like a lot of the music, I get the sense that it is a two-word definition for this concept:  "Popular songs from albums that get played on radio while all the other music made by the artist is ignored".  For example, "Purple Haze", a great Hendrix song, would get plenty of air play, but I've never heard his marvelous "One Rainy Wish" aired.  Or Jefferson's "White Rabbit" is played millions of times, but never "3/5 of a Mile in 10 Seconds".   So I guess I think of "Classic Rock" as a limited, "hits only" kind of music.
    interesting....I don't consider classic rock to only contain the hits of that era....if it fits that sound, even whether it's from that particular time period or not, it's classic rock. Take The Sheepdogs for example. newer band. Total classic rock sound. So that's how I explain them to people. 

    kind of like "classical" isn't only from a certain time period. people still make classical music. i think classic rock is only called "classic rock" because of a lack of imagination of what to actually name it. lol
    ....courage is fear that just said its prayers....


  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 36,174
    brianlux said:
    I'm kind of biased against the term "Classic Rock" because, as much as I like a lot of the music, I get the sense that it is a two-word definition for this concept:  "Popular songs from albums that get played on radio while all the other music made by the artist is ignored".  For example, "Purple Haze", a great Hendrix song, would get plenty of air play, but I've never heard his marvelous "One Rainy Wish" aired.  Or Jefferson's "White Rabbit" is played millions of times, but never "3/5 of a Mile in 10 Seconds".   So I guess I think of "Classic Rock" as a limited, "hits only" kind of music.
    interesting....I don't consider classic rock to only contain the hits of that era....if it fits that sound, even whether it's from that particular time period or not, it's classic rock. Take The Sheepdogs for example. newer band. Total classic rock sound. So that's how I explain them to people. 

    kind of like "classical" isn't only from a certain time period. people still make classical music. i think classic rock is only called "classic rock" because of a lack of imagination of what to actually name it. lol

    Good point about classical music still being made today.  There are still and probably always will be great classical composers.

    And that last sentence is funny!  But then, I don't have a better term for "classic rock" myself, lol!.
    brianlux said:
    I'm kind of biased against the term "Classic Rock" because, as much as I like a lot of the music, I get the sense that it is a two-word definition for this concept:  "Popular songs from albums that get played on radio while all the other music made by the artist is ignored".  For example, "Purple Haze", a great Hendrix song, would get plenty of air play, but I've never heard his marvelous "One Rainy Wish" aired.  Or Jefferson's "White Rabbit" is played millions of times, but never "3/5 of a Mile in 10 Seconds".   So I guess I think of "Classic Rock" as a limited, "hits only" kind of music.
    That is radio spoon feeding you the music because they have the math figured out on what people generally want to hear.

    You think I want to hear friggin Jeremy and Black all the time?  No, play all those yesterdays and Of the Girl.

    Also I would like to add that one day whilst driving I heard these awesome guitar riffs on the radio.  Was wondering what 90's Seattle band this was.  DJ gets on and says that was Jimmi Hendrix and this show is "so you think you know Jimmi?"

    No idea what song it was but they played things I never knew existed because I never really listened to Hendrix.  I was blown away.

    Time to brush up on your Jimi, my friend!   I'm really curious as to what song that was the DJ played.  Hum us a bit, would ya?  :lol:
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • LB260405LB260405 Posts: 19
    Let’s look at it from a different angle — is all rock-adjacent music from the 60s/70s considered classic rock?

    Folk:
    Simon and Garfunkel
    Crosby, Stills and Nash
    The Mamas and the Papas
    The Byrds
    The Hollies

    Singer/Songwriters:
    Bob Dylan
    Joni Mitchell
    Nick Drake
    Van Morrison
    Cat Stevens
    James Taylor
    Elton John

    If they do fit into the “classic rock” category, is it “classic folk rock”? As someone suggested earlier, classical is always classical. Unless there is a classic classical genre that I’m unaware of.

    What about ABBA? The Bee Gees? They are played on classic rock stations, but they are certainly not rock and roll. If we put them into a separate “pop” category, would The Beatles and The Rolling Stones be taken out of the classic rock category and put in with the pop bands?
  • JOEJOEJOEJOEJOEJOE Posts: 9,753
    Is classic rock a genre or an era??
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 23,974
    JOEJOEJOE said:
    Is classic rock a genre or an era??
    To me, it's an era.  66-late 70's. 
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 36,174
    edited January 12
    LB260405 said:
    Let’s look at it from a different angle — is all rock-adjacent music from the 60s/70s considered classic rock?

    Folk:
    Simon and Garfunkel
    Crosby, Stills and Nash
    The Mamas and the Papas
    The Byrds
    The Hollies

    Singer/Songwriters:
    Bob Dylan
    Joni Mitchell
    Nick Drake
    Van Morrison
    Cat Stevens
    James Taylor
    Elton John

    If they do fit into the “classic rock” category, is it “classic folk rock”? As someone suggested earlier, classical is always classical. Unless there is a classic classical genre that I’m unaware of.

    What about ABBA? The Bee Gees? They are played on classic rock stations, but they are certainly not rock and roll. If we put them into a separate “pop” category, would The Beatles and The Rolling Stones be taken out of the classic rock category and put in with the pop bands?

    Good points here.  I don't consider any of those groups or musicians to be classic rock.
    Beatles, Stones, definitely classic rock, though you could break them down further into classic pop-rock and Stones Classic Rock and Rock Rock.  And then we go down that rabbit hole you pointed out, lol.

    As far as classical music goes, technically classic music is but one era of orchestral music as part of the continuum of orchestral music:


             Early Music – Till 1400.
    • Renaissance – 1400-1600.
    • Baroque – 1600-1750.
    • Classical – 1750-1830.
    • Romantic – 1830-1900.
    • 20th Century – 1900-2000.
    • Modern – 2000-present.

    Post edited by brianlux on
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 29,307
    mrussel1 said:
    JOEJOEJOE said:
    Is classic rock a genre or an era??
    To me, it's an era.  66-late 70's. 
    listen to The Sheepdogs. or Greta Van Fleet. it's a genre that was born out of an era. 
    ....courage is fear that just said its prayers....


  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 19,114
    mrussel1 said:
    brianlux said:
    Though we're mostly talking about classic rock here, we seem to touch on something that comes up often: What is in store for the future for music?  I think about this a lot and mostly out of frustration because I am of a generation that lucked out and lived through several huge transitions in pop and rock music- from very early rock and roll and pop, to early 60's folk explosion, to 60's rock, blues rock, hard rock, psychedelia, prog, jazz/rock fusion, disco, New York CBGB scene, early punk, punk, new wave,  hardcore, metal, paisley underground, indi/college rock, grunge, rap (and whatever else I've missed)- not all favorite genres, but all adding something to the stew that has been popular music for the last several decades.
    What I question though is, are we (or am I) expecting too much in wanting to see yet another big change in music?  Music never evolved this quickly until the modern era.  It followed the same trajectory as rapid development of technology and population.  Add to that our world-wide rapid communications with so much information being shared so quickly and broadly, it becomes very difficult to come up with new formulas.

    Think about it- when is the last time a truly new form of popular (or even not-so-popular) music evolved?  Have we possibly hit a wall, mined all the possibilities, run out of new ideas?  What would it take to create a truly new form of music?  Newly created musical instruments?  New ways to alter sound waves? Finding new sounds never heard before?  Increasing the ability of humans to hear a broader spectrum of sound waves?  New drugs?  I really don't have a clue, but seeing how little the needle has moved in the last two decades compared to the last half of the 20th  century, I don't hold out much hope anymore for seeing anything truly new to coming to music.
    And I sincerely hope I am wrong.

    New drugs... we definitely need new drugs. 
    Huey Lewis has been screaming about that shit for years...

    We did get fentanyl.  Does that count?
    It counts as to why you’re No. 1, Chris. 
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • ZodZod Posts: 8,117
    I still think it's pretty much most rock made up until the seattle/grunge era.

    Beatles/Stones/Zeppelin etc.. fans were probably as annoyed when we started calling their music classic rock, as we are with younger generations calling our music classic.

    I think most quality rock music is now classic rock.   It was 30 years ago now our era exploded.   At that point the 60's/70's are was less in the past.

    That's my thought's.  I have up defending it when I started hearing early 90's music on classic rock stations 15 years ago.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 36,174
    mrussel1 said:
    JOEJOEJOE said:
    Is classic rock a genre or an era??
    To me, it's an era.  66-late 70's. 
    listen to The Sheepdogs. or Greta Van Fleet. it's a genre that was born out of an era. 

    I wonder how they will be referred to in coming years?  Neo-Classic Rock?  Classic Rock Nouveau? Retro-Rock?   Post-Classic Album Oriented Rock? 
    Something else?
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 29,307
    brianlux said:
    mrussel1 said:
    JOEJOEJOE said:
    Is classic rock a genre or an era??
    To me, it's an era.  66-late 70's. 
    listen to The Sheepdogs. or Greta Van Fleet. it's a genre that was born out of an era. 

    I wonder how they will be referred to in coming years?  Neo-Classic Rock?  Classic Rock Nouveau? Retro-Rock?   Post-Classic Album Oriented Rock? 
    Something else?
    post-classic rock, if past is prologue (post punk, post grunge, etc)
    ....courage is fear that just said its prayers....


  • LB260405LB260405 Posts: 19
    If any of you enjoyed the classic rock roundtable podcast from the first post, part 2 is now available.

    https://musicrewind.podbean.com/

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