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Open Letter to Mr. Vedder

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Comments

  • luxpjamerluxpjamer Posts: 837
    May I ask why you are so hostile about this?

    He plays the costanza role :D
    Beavis : Is this Pearl Jam?
    Butt-head: This guy makes faces like Eddie Vedder.
    Beavis: No, Eddie Vedder makes faces like this guy.
    Butt-head: I heard these guys, like, came first and Pearl Jam ripped them off.
    Beavis: No, Pearl Jam came first.
    Butt-head: Well, they both suck.
  • luxpjamer wrote:
    Oh, Captain, my captain!
    ( I'm standing on the table) ;)

    Pearl Jam live at the garden ! But almost every Bootleg has a great live version ! Sometimes Ed Vedder add some improved lyrics at the end...sometimes they are more optimist but they also can be very pessimist. It's kind of bi-polar.
    Here's what they add in Vienna: I dreamt to you, Where ever you are tonight, I dreamt to you, I'm having a better time than you are tonight, Where ever you are , where ever you are, Fucked up when you let me, Fucked up when you lost me, could'nt be you, couldn't be you, could have been you !


    luxpjamer,

    Thanks for your response. I, too, have heard a few versions of "Black." In at least one (thank Godot for YouTube.com!), EV changed the lyrics. I can only imagine that most artists get their muse from strong emotions. It's emotions that drive their performances. His lyrics probably change with his moods. Emotions are probably a two-edged sword.

    Mr. Bruno

    PS. I LOVE that you are standing on life's table, belting out life's lyrics! That's a loudspeaker for the soul!
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • luxpjamer wrote:
    No work for me exept playing one song. That was too funny

    I've taken a few classes that were easy, too. I guess we need that once in a while.

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • luxpjamer wrote:
    He plays the costanza role :D


    Some get up on the wrong side of the bed. Others live there. Personally, I would rather focus on the postive side of things. Then again, that's just me.

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • my2handsmy2hands Posts: 17,118
    nice original post, but i would definitely remove those #'s.

    "hello, mr bruno, it's me, eddie" :D
  • my2hands wrote:
    nice original post, but i would definitely remove those #'s.

    "hello, mr bruno, it's me, eddie" :D

    Such a cruel taunt, sir!

    However, I can forward the school's contact info to the Mods....Better safe than sorry?

    Mr. B
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • brokenarrowbrokenarrow Posts: 478
    Such a cruel taunt, sir!

    However, I can forward the school's contact info to the Mods....Better safe than sorry?

    Mr. B


    I was thinking about all that info on a public board and I definitely agree with those who felt the information should be removed. I've gotta be honest Mr. Bruno, I would even be hesitant to leave your school name, town and state at the bottom of your original post.
    Having worked in a middle school for quite a few years, I've never mentioned the name of the school, the district, or any other information on the board.
    Maybe it's just me and a few others but, I'm very hesitant and cautious when it comes to stuff like this...especially because of the children.

    You might want to contact Kat and Sea for them to clean up any quoted posts, all of your info is still in the quotes.

    -brokenarrow>
  • I was thinking about all that info on a public board and I definitely agree with those who felt the information should be removed. I've gotta be honest Mr. Bruno, I would even be hesitant to leave your school name, town and state at the bottom of your original post.
    Having worked in a middle school for quite a few years, I've never mentioned the name of the school, the district, or any other information on the board.
    Maybe it's just me and a few others but, I'm very hesitant and cautious when it comes to stuff like this...especially because of the children.

    You might want to contact Kat and Sea for them to clean up any quoted posts, all of your info is still in the quotes.

    -brokenarrow>

    I took care of it, forwarding my request to Kat. Perhaps you are right. I'll heed your advice. Thanks for giving me perspective.

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • brokenarrowbrokenarrow Posts: 478
    Good deal Mr. Bruno....

    pssst...kat and sea kick a lot of ass don't they? ;)
  • WanWan Posts: 18
    I like your story...the students have a privilege to learn deeply about poetry and music too...and when they listen the music? They like PJ now?
    did you try to make the analysis from Jeremy in your school? it´s hard, no?



    Dear Mr. Vedder,

    My name is Mr. Bruno. I'm a Maryland English Teacher.
    On behalf of my three 8th grade classes, we have a story to share.

    For the past three years, I have included the lyrics to your song
    "Black" as part of my Journey Through Genres unit. Initially, I
    introduce "Black" as a poem. In the end of the Journeys Through
    Genres unit, I ask the kids if they want to hear "Black" being "read,"
    and I play your song. They always seem stunned when they realize that a
    song is really nothing more than poetry married to rhythm.

    I must admit that teaching "Black" is one of the highlights of my
    year, and the kids love it, too. My students actually whined when I
    took the lyrics back from them (too much to go over during a 45 minute
    block of time). They wanted to know how the "poem" ended: I only
    let them examine the song stanza by stanza, and we only got through the
    first two stanzas during the first day. Never before have I seen them so
    hungry for more. One promising young student even asked for a copy of
    the lyrics. As a teacher, those moments are pure gold. It makes me
    proud to be an educator.

    When we review "Black" we treat it to literary analysis: we go
    over Imagery, Metaphor, Mood, Tone, and Symbolism. In addition, we
    examine the emotional temperature of the piece. The kids seemed to be
    right-on-the-money with respect to the mood of "Black." They both
    felt and appreciated the Narrator's pain as he laments the loss of a
    girlfriend.

    Here's what we came up with.

    Empty canvas and untouched sheets of clay suggest that something is
    incomplete in the Narrator's life, contrasting the two aspects of his
    life. When she was in his life, the Narrator/artist was able to produce
    his work. Now that the relationship is over, he lacks the steam
    required to continue his art. The words empty and untouched suggest a
    barren, austere emotional climate. They illuminate potential that goes
    empty and untouched.

    Comparing the Antagonist to the sun suggests that she provides heat,
    warmth, and life to the Narrator, the proper "earthen bed" required
    to nourish and promote the flower of happiness, growth, and
    self-actualization. In short, she was everything to him. She completed
    him. This totality can be seen in the fact that the word everything is
    repeated several times during the subsequent portions of the song. The
    line, "Now the air I tasted and breathed, has taken a turn" sharply
    marks Tone. It is the Narrator dropping his mask and speaking directly
    to us about how he feels about his loss. Not only was she his sun, she
    was the air that sustained him. And with the souring of the
    relationship, so sours the air. With the souring of the air comes the
    souring of the Narrator. He gasps for breath, choking on his situation.
    This slow, emotional suffocation is mute testimony to the honesty of his
    pain, his loss, and the slow fragmentation of his security. The
    Narrator can no longer breathe without suffering, and every breath
    haunts him. The fact that he is required to breathe this sour air is an
    ever-present reminder of the Narrator's all-consuming pain.

    When we reviewed the lines, "And all I taught her was everything / I
    know she gave me all that she wore," a few students echoed some of my
    private thoughts. Those lines read as if a young art professor had
    fallen in love with one of his students. Several students from
    different classes came up with that interpretation. The bitter hands
    chafing is testimony to the Narrator rubbing his hands together in a
    compulsive attempt to cope with his loss. The "washing" of the
    pictures is a metaphor depicting the destruction of what was once a
    beautiful relationship. The image of destroying a painting is a
    powerful symbol showing how one feels when love decays. The loss of
    that loved one feels like the destruction of a beautiful work of art.
    The reference to a tattoo suggests that the Narrator's pain is
    permanent. The pain is being compared to a tattoo's ink. Even though
    that pain will fade/run over time, the Narrator feels that it will
    always be there, just like a tattoo.

    I feel that, "I take a walk outside / I"m surrounded by some kids
    at play / I can feel their laughter, so why do I sear?" is one of the
    most powerful lines in literary history. Those words capture the slow
    burn endured by those who are haunted by the fading echoes of true love.
    It's as if the pain is both amplified by and juxtaposed with the
    reminder that everyone around the Narrator has permission to be happy,
    yet he is condemned to what he sees as an eternity of suffering,
    slow-roasting over the white-hot coals of what was, and taunted by what
    will never be. The juxtaposition of beautiful laughter and paralytic
    pain eclipses the Narrator's happiness, highlighting his angst all the
    more.

    The 'twisted thoughts' can be thought of as the manic replaying of
    what the Narrator could have done/should have done to salvage the
    relationship, second-guessing himself and dooming himself to torturous
    self-examination. This self-questioning erodes the Narrator's
    stability, leaving him reeling from his efforts.

    As the Antagonist is being compared to his sun, the line, "How quick
    the sun can drop away" shows a bitter, clipped Tone, capturing the
    sarcastic hemorrhage felt by the Narrator. The sun's dropping is
    testimony to the fact that the relationship is over. Love's glow has
    faded. In her absence, in the sun's absence, the image created is
    that of a man trying to scratch out an existence in a bleak word devoid
    of warmth, light, love, and hope. Trapped within the bleak ruins of his
    own emotional wasteland, the Narrator feels that he is at risk of drying
    out and shriveling up. The Narrator identifies with Sisyphus, condemned
    to an eternity of rolling his emotional boulder up life's steep
    inclines.

    If the antagonist can be referred to a precious glass statue, then the,
    "bitter hands that cradle broken glass," shows how the Narrator
    cannot heal, despite the end of the relationship. The image created is
    that of a masochist who cannot release the sharp fragments of something
    that was once dear to him, trapped within a vicious cycle of
    self-injury: he holds love's broken pieces, and they lacerate him.
    Going against both intuition and friends' sound advice, he hugs it
    again, perpetuating the cycle of self-mutilation. The word cradle
    suggests that the Narrator will pursue any hope, however fleeting, of
    resuscitating the relationship. The fact that the relationship keeps
    slicing him is as powerful as it is self-defeating.

    When the Narrator's world turns to black, he bears his soul, naked to
    the world. He allows the readers a rare glimpse into the true depth of
    his woe. This hurt, this emotional tattoo, ruins all that he sees, all
    that he is, and all that he will ever be. This pain is symbolized by
    the tattoo. His pain is so pervasive that he sees this grief has having
    amputated part of his future, pillorying hope for what tomorrow could
    bring.

    "Black" ends with a failed coup-de-grace. Unable to admit defeat
    and move on, the Narrator cannot shake hands and walk away. While the
    Narrator recognizes that the Antagonist will be the star in someone
    else's sky, he laments that she will not be the star in his sky,
    agonizing over the fact that it wasn't meant to be. "Why can't it
    be mine?" eliminates any chance of moving on, uprooting any growth
    made towards closure. Buried within the wasteland of his heart, the
    Narrator cannot see that he cannot see beyond the immediacy of it all.


    "Black" captures all the emptiness, all the ache, and all the doom
    felt by most young people when they look back on their clumsy first
    attempts at love. It is my opinion that "Black" is one of the most
    powerful pieces of poetry in the textbook that is our world.

    My 8th grade classes are deeply interested in knowing what inspired
    "Black." From where did it come? From what? That, and they
    just wanted thank the person who found a voice for those who had
    previously suffered in silence.

    Sincerely,

    Mr. Bruno
  • Good deal Mr. Bruno....

    pssst...kat and sea kick a lot of ass don't they? ;)


    Agreed...they have amazing Jedi powers. They rock the locks off of Mr. Spock's box. : )

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • Wan wrote:
    I like your story...the students have a privilege to learn deeply about poetry and music too...and when they listen the music? They like PJ now?
    did you try to make the analysis from Jeremy in your school? it´s hard, no?


    Wan,

    Thanks for your support. Over the last three years, I have had several students tell me that my lessons on "Black" either turned them on to PJ or deepened their love for PJ.

    Either way, we have won a few more "converts." : )

    Aint education a wonderful thing?

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • Good deal Mr. Bruno....

    pssst...kat and sea kick a lot of ass don't they? ;)


    Indeed!

    : )

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • xmoniquex wrote:
    wauw...you really are an inspiring teacher


    Thanks!
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • jamjamjamjam Posts: 491
    Thanks!


    um
    i never read your thread
    and i don't plan on it either..
    but i get the feeling you're a good teacher.

    i just read a few things here and there.
  • jamjam wrote:
    but i get the feeling you're a good teacher.

    Thanks. I really try to be the best possible teacher. I consider myself to be one the luckiest people in the world: I love what I do.

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • seagoat2seagoat2 Posts: 241
    Hey, Mr. Bruno.....I had a teacher in jr. high school who also had us look into song lyrics in poetry class.....I really loved it. I think it's great what you're doing. I never forgot that teacher.....I guess I was lucky, I had a lot of great teachers. In high school, one of my creative writing teachers even lent me his big book of Bob Dylan song lyrics.....he was a great guy.
  • Restless SoulRestless Soul Posts: 806
    Mr Bruno

    Your post and work with young people is really inspiring to read, and the interpretation of Black that you and the kids came up with. I think you are right in getting the kids to come up with their own interpretations because their views are just as valid as anyones. :)

    I've read most of this thread, (not all) and the thing that worries me, and I know its been mentioned before, is the fact that you are hoping that Eddie will contact the kids. I really really hope he does, for your and the kids' sake but I remember reading an interview with Eddie from the early days where he said he didn't explain his songs but was always interested in hearing other people's interpretations. If he does contact you be prepared for the fact that he still might not explain the song. It's his prerogative not to. Also, I hope you haven't told the kids you are trying to contact him because it could set them up for a fall. They should be aware that their own interpretations are just as valid, to them anyway. That way they can learn that there isn't always a "right" or "wrong" answer, especially in poetry, but there are many shades of grey in between, and all of them could be equally valid. And that debating the rights and wrongs of a line and justifying it is part of the fun.

    You talk about wanting to "save" the children and I think this is really commendable. I think you are already doing this by your work in teaching them to think and analyse things for themselves and allowing them to get exposed to good literature.

    As for preventing them from getting into drugs or pregnancy or drop out of school, that takes a whole lot more work than an English teacher can deliver - are you sure you are not cut out to be a youth worker instead? :P I think those things can be combatted by raising awareness and education. Maybe exposure to an inspiring celebrity can help too, so good luck with that!

    Anyway, what I really wanted to suggest is that if you are looking for another work of Eddie's I'd suggest Sleight of Hand from the Binaural album. I love this because to me it is about alienation and being lost from yourself, being a small cog in a big wheel, and then finding the power in yourself to change an unhappy situation in your life. To me its about self-empowerment - maybe something else the kids could learn about? ;) (I also second the Present Tense suggestion!)



    routine was the theme, he'd wake up and...wash and pour himself into uniform
    something he hadn't imagined being...
    as the merging traffic passed, he found himself staring, down, at his own hands..
    not remembering the change, not recalling the plan, was it...?
    he was okay, but wondering about wandering
    was it age? by consequence? or was he moved by sleight of hand?
    mondays were made to fall, lost on a road he knew by heart
    it was like a book he read in his sleep, endlessly...
    sometimes he hid in his radio, watching others pull into their homes
    while he was drifting...
    on a line, of his own, off the line, on the side
    by the by, as dirt turned to sand, as if moved by sleight of hand
    when he reached the shore of his clip-on world
    he resurfaced to the norm
    organized his few things, his coat and keys...
    any new realizations would have to wait til he had more time, more time...
    time to dream, to himself
    he waves goodbye, to himself
    i'll see you on the other side...
    another man...moved by sleight of hand...
    "We have to change the concept of patriotism to one of “matriotism” — love of humanity that transcends war. A matriarch would never send her own children off to wars that kill other people’s children." Cindy Sheehan
    ---
    London, Brixton, 14 July 1993
    London, Wembley, 1996
    London, Wembley, 18 June 2007
    London, O2, 18 August 2009
    London, Hammersmith Apollo (Ed solo), 31 July 2012
    Milton Keynes Bowl, 11 July 2014
    London, Hammersmith Apollo (Ed solo), 06 June 2017
    London, O2, 18 June 2018
    London, O2, 17 July 2018
    Amsterdam, Afas Live (Ed solo), 09 June 2019
    Amsterdam, Afas Live (Ed solo), 10 June 2019



  • Restless SoulRestless Soul Posts: 806
    Mateo wrote:
    Dear naive people..
    Ok Mr. Bruno is trying really hard and is a good teacher.
    But all of you who fell for that -that he got a response from Eddie and are now obviously congratulating him..I've got a question..Why didn't he post the damn letter or at least write down..Hey just got a mail back from Eddie?? Because is a lie..and by posting it Kat and Sea would know it..Why posting everybody PM..ow I've got a response..It really isn't a big deal different from posting it in the thread..after all it will complete the thread...
    So if it's true..don't sing it bring it...

    Did he say that? I just looked over the thread and it doesn't say he got a response?
    "We have to change the concept of patriotism to one of “matriotism” — love of humanity that transcends war. A matriarch would never send her own children off to wars that kill other people’s children." Cindy Sheehan
    ---
    London, Brixton, 14 July 1993
    London, Wembley, 1996
    London, Wembley, 18 June 2007
    London, O2, 18 August 2009
    London, Hammersmith Apollo (Ed solo), 31 July 2012
    Milton Keynes Bowl, 11 July 2014
    London, Hammersmith Apollo (Ed solo), 06 June 2017
    London, O2, 18 June 2018
    London, O2, 17 July 2018
    Amsterdam, Afas Live (Ed solo), 09 June 2019
    Amsterdam, Afas Live (Ed solo), 10 June 2019



  • Mateo wrote:
    Doesn't say No..But my friend told me that he posted him a PM message saying just that. Well ask Mr. Bruno in PM...

    EDIT: ANd you can see some people saying Congratulations and stuff.. that is because of the "REPLY".

    If there was I reply (I disbelieve) it think it should be posted..at least to say what it was written because you made it possible and got it noticed too. (There are TWO SAME Threads of this!)

    I am willing to share the flavor of what he wrote, but it wouldn’t be fair to publish his email. It was written in confidence, and I don’t want to cross that line.

    Ed responded. I got the email a few nights ago. His response was short, but it was deeply meaningful. He reminded me that getting inner-city students to work at literature is its own reward. He's right.

    Also, Ed reminded me to value any student's deep connection to a story, a poem, or a song. If the meaning resonates deep within the child, than that interpretation has its own intrinsic meaning. That's true. However, if a student claims that “Black” is one man’s lamentation over the fact that the line at the McDonalds Drive-Through is too long, then I will have to respectfully disagree. “Black” is a painful expression of love lost, and of how that cut heals far too slowly.

    In addition, I can infer that the original post/analysis of “Black” seemed to be right on the money. “Black” is about love lost. It is a terrible anthem that all of us can relate to. How many of us, as we grow old and gray, can look back on the bitter ache of loss from those early, deeply-meaningful loves? Loves that failed, for one reason or another. “Black” is timeless in its story, in its power, and in its truth.

    I think that I can now understand the ardent fever behind the PJ fan base. Even in his prose, EV has a genuine charisma about him. A magnetism. Perhaps he should have been a politician. Who knows.

    I have been given a literary gift, and it is my privilege to share that gift with my students. I’m blessed in that I had several teachers/professors inspire me. I can only hope to inspire my students, too.

    When “Black” hit the scene in the early 90's, I was going through a truly ugly break up. ““Black”” felt like a gift to me. For the first time in my young life, I was able to see my life reflected in a song. That moment was an epiphany for me....I just didn't realize it back then. I was too young, too hurt. “Black” started me down the path of teaching. I feel indebted to PJ for having created "“Black”." Through my teaching, I have been able to share with Ed what I have been doing. This thread has allowed me to return the favor. What “Black” has done for me, I have returned in kind. The circle is now complete.

    Did I tell you that a few students' interpretations of “Black” matched EV's, nearly to the letter? Most gasped when I read shared EV’s email. I called over those students, those gifted few with both a keen literary insight and the courage to share their insights before their teenage peers, and I spoke with them privately. I thanked them. That may have been the first time that an adult male role model had ever seen value in them. More than that, I got them to finally see their own magnificent self-worth. When I told them how proud I was of them, the boys had tears in their eyes. I reminded all of my students to always believe in themselves. It took the 2006-2007 school year for them to see what I had seen all along: their value as humans. As a result, one of my students told me that she now wants to be a teacher. It took the entire 2006-2007 school year for her to realize what I had known all along: she matters. She has a future. Overall, I told all of my students how proud of them I was. And they were proud of themselves.....perhaps for the first time ever. I was able to have them glimpse the slow dawn of their self-worth, perhaps for the first time ever. Teachers touch and change lives. We do something. We create something. We plant seeds. Let’s see what grows.


    Words cannot express how that makes me feel as an educator, as a parent, and as an altruist. Some moments transcend linguistic description. Having “Lee Lee” find her own inner voice was one of them, a life affirming moment.


    No one walked away crushed because PJ wasn't going to give a free concert. That was one of Ed’s concerns. He didn’t want me to set them up for a bitter disappointment. Don't worry, Eddie. No feelings were crushed. They took it all in stride. They were just happy that you responded. A few have been changed....perhaps forever. You have helped to make that happen.

    Today is gold. Pure, rich gold. I think that I owe the Pearl Jam Message Pit dinner.

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • seagoat2 wrote:
    Hey, Mr. Bruno.....I had a teacher in jr. high school who also had us look into song lyrics in poetry class.....I really loved it. I think it's great what you're doing. I never forgot that teacher.....I guess I was lucky, I had a lot of great teachers. In high school, one of my creative writing teachers even lent me his big book of Bob Dylan song lyrics.....he was a great guy.


    seagoat2,

    It's those great guys that we remember the most. When teachers make the time to make that personal connection with a student, we revalue that child. Sometimes, that's the only value the child has ever had. Some students come from tragic backgrounds.

    Something as simple as using "modern" songs as poetry is a great, non-threatening way to introduce literary devices: metaphor, symbolism, mood, tone, etc.

    Sometimes, a song can open a door that a textbook may have kept shut.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • Mateo wrote:
    Dear naive people..
    Ok Mr. Bruno is trying really hard and is a good teacher.
    But all of you who fell for that -that he got a response from Eddie and are now obviously congratulating him..I've got a question..Why didn't he post the damn letter or at least write down..Hey just got a mail back from Eddie?? Because is a lie..and by posting it Kat and Sea would know it..Why posting everybody PM..ow I've got a response..It really isn't a big deal different from posting it in the thread..after all it will complete the thread...
    So if it's true..don't sing it bring it...


    Posting another's email without permission is underhanded.

    In addition, your tone/word choice makes you seems so bitter: naive, fell for it, damn letter, lie, etc. Why the rancour? What fuels your discontent? Why can't you enjoy the feel-good moment? I didn't get free concert tickets. I didn't get free CD's. I didn't ask for money from PJ. PJ didn't buy me a 2nd house. I only got a response. Why not take it at face value and enjoy the synergy?
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • Mr Bruno

    Your post and work with young people is really inspiring to read, and the interpretation of Black that you and the kids came up with. I think you are right in getting the kids to come up with their own interpretations because their views are just as valid as anyones. :)

    I've read most of this thread, (not all) and the thing that worries me, and I know its been mentioned before, is the fact that you are hoping that Eddie will contact the kids. I really really hope he does, for your and the kids' sake but I remember reading an interview with Eddie from the early days where he said he didn't explain his songs but was always interested in hearing other people's interpretations. If he does contact you be prepared for the fact that he still might not explain the song. It's his prerogative not to. Also, I hope you haven't told the kids you are trying to contact him because it could set them up for a fall. They should be aware that their own interpretations are just as valid, to them anyway. That way they can learn that there isn't always a "right" or "wrong" answer, especially in poetry, but there are many shades of grey in between, and all of them could be equally valid. And that debating the rights and wrongs of a line and justifying it is part of the fun.

    You talk about wanting to "save" the children and I think this is really commendable. I think you are already doing this by your work in teaching them to think and analyse things for themselves and allowing them to get exposed to good literature.

    As for preventing them from getting into drugs or pregnancy or drop out of school, that takes a whole lot more work than an English teacher can deliver - are you sure you are not cut out to be a youth worker instead? :P I think those things can be combatted by raising awareness and education. Maybe exposure to an inspiring celebrity can help too, so good luck with that!

    Anyway, what I really wanted to suggest is that if you are looking for another work of Eddie's I'd suggest Sleight of Hand from the Binaural album. I love this because to me it is about alienation and being lost from yourself, being a small cog in a big wheel, and then finding the power in yourself to change an unhappy situation in your life. To me its about self-empowerment - maybe something else the kids could learn about? ;) (I also second the Present Tense suggestion!)



    routine was the theme, he'd wake up and...wash and pour himself into uniform
    something he hadn't imagined being...
    as the merging traffic passed, he found himself staring, down, at his own hands..
    not remembering the change, not recalling the plan, was it...?
    he was okay, but wondering about wandering
    was it age? by consequence? or was he moved by sleight of hand?
    mondays were made to fall, lost on a road he knew by heart
    it was like a book he read in his sleep, endlessly...
    sometimes he hid in his radio, watching others pull into their homes
    while he was drifting...
    on a line, of his own, off the line, on the side
    by the by, as dirt turned to sand, as if moved by sleight of hand
    when he reached the shore of his clip-on world
    he resurfaced to the norm
    organized his few things, his coat and keys...
    any new realizations would have to wait til he had more time, more time...
    time to dream, to himself
    he waves goodbye, to himself
    i'll see you on the other side...
    another man...moved by sleight of hand...

    Check for a PM. : )

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • 3inputchick3inputchick Posts: 845
    Check for a PM. : )

    Mr. Bruno
    tell me about this PM you keep sending out....
    A pessimist is a man who thinks all women are bad. An optimist is one who hopes they are.
  • tell me about this PM you keep sending out....

    Doh!

    I was talking to Restless Soul. I just sent her a PM.
    Perhaps I should have been more specific.

    Sorry for the confusion!
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • CRAWLDAD wrote:
    well, first let me say that this is a great idea n probably a great way to reach out to a misguided youth..

    what did the children say when they heard the song?????

    did any of them search for more lyrics by PJ?

    all in all --- very greatful to read a great post

    thanks, n keep on rockin!!!!

    Overall, they really liked the song. They appreciated Black's sad mood/tone.
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • AndiMAndiM Posts: 102
    This thread gives me a kind of dejá-vu ;-). Interesting.

    Back in 2001 it was my English teacher in Germany who introduced me to Pearl Jam by playing and discussing "Wishlist" in class. Good to know that there are other teachers out there like that.
  • AndiM wrote:
    This thread gives me a kind of dejá-vu ;-). Interesting.

    Back in 2001 it was my English teacher in Germany who introduced me to Pearl Jam by playing and discussing "Wishlist" in class. Good to know that there are other teachers out there like that.


    AndiM,

    I'll have to check out "Wishlist." The Message Pit has introduced me to so many PJ songs that I had not been familiar with. I'll have to check it out.

    Mr. Bruno
    Dalai Lama—To say that humility is an essential ingredient in our pursuit of spiritual transformation may seem to be at odds with what I have said about the need for confidence. But there is clearly a distinction to be made between valid confidence or self-esteem, and conceit - which we can describe as an inflated sense of importance, grounded in a false image of self.
  • ChrisDChrisD Posts: 48
    I hope Vedder somehow reads your post.

    :D I can't wait to play some bootleg in the future and hear Vedder go: "Ehm... there's a... a.. a teacher in Maryland.. And she ehm... wrote us all an open letter, maybe you've read it on the website. And ehm... and she teaches our next song to her students, and they break it down to analyze the poetry in it ... .... etcetera " :D
    "Ransom paid the Devil, he whispers pleasing words.
    Triumphant are the angels if they can get there first."
  • well im in eighth grade right, and on friday my english teacher told us we are going to do poetry this week and to bring in our favorite lyrics so we could compare it to poetry and whatnot. anyways, i ended up printing the lyrics to black and the letter taht you wrote and asked her to read it. Today she came up to me and told me how much she loved your explanation and that she'll prolly will use it in class when we do the lyrics (i think tomorrow or thursday...)

    btw i had like the hardest time choosing my favorite! haha i ended up choosing Sad (fav. song) Come Back and Indifference (ive been having a 'must listen to these songs' phase lately...)
    www.myspace.com/saveyou23
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