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GOP

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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 22,680
    edited June 24
    doubt it survives challenge
    Post edited by mickeyrat on
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  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 6,052
    So now General Mark Milley is in the cross hairs of the GOP. 

    Good stuff,. 


    Looks like all that talk about supporting the troops holds about as much water as blue lives matter when it comes down to brass tacks. 

  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,075
    carlson actually called him "not just a pig, he's also stupid". are you kidding me?
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 28,822
    So now General Mark Milley is in the cross hairs of the GOP. 

    Good stuff,. 


    Looks like all that talk about supporting the troops holds about as much water as blue lives matter when it comes down to brass tacks. 

    Milley would love to take Matt Getts Off on a tour of Afghanistan, maybe spend a few nights at a FOB. Then let’s see The Matt Getts Off smirk.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 6,052
    carlson actually called him "not just a pig, he's also stupid". are you kidding me?

    I too want to understand the white rage that led to trump, and 1/6, and the abandonment of the Capitol Police, etc. Because from my perspective, it doesn't make any sense whatsoever. 



    Carlson mocks the idea of white rage and would have his viewers believe it doesn't exist despite him having made millions from peddling in it; his viewers are too f'ing stupid to realize this. 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,450
    carlson actually called him "not just a pig, he's also stupid". are you kidding me?

    I too want to understand the white rage that led to trump, and 1/6, and the abandonment of the Capitol Police, etc. Because from my perspective, it doesn't make any sense whatsoever. 



    Carlson mocks the idea of white rage and would have his viewers believe it doesn't exist despite him having made millions from peddling in it; his viewers are too f'ing stupid to realize this. 
    White rage is being investigated.  Pelosi made a committee up.  Should be interesting.
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 6,052
    carlson actually called him "not just a pig, he's also stupid". are you kidding me?

    I too want to understand the white rage that led to trump, and 1/6, and the abandonment of the Capitol Police, etc. Because from my perspective, it doesn't make any sense whatsoever. 



    Carlson mocks the idea of white rage and would have his viewers believe it doesn't exist despite him having made millions from peddling in it; his viewers are too f'ing stupid to realize this. 
    White rage is being investigated.  Pelosi made a committee up.  Should be interesting.

    In true Fox news fashion, just drop "Pelosi" or "Obama" or "Hillary" to distract & keep people whistling past the graveyard.  



    Well done. 
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,075
    carlson actually called him "not just a pig, he's also stupid". are you kidding me?

    I too want to understand the white rage that led to trump, and 1/6, and the abandonment of the Capitol Police, etc. Because from my perspective, it doesn't make any sense whatsoever. 



    Carlson mocks the idea of white rage and would have his viewers believe it doesn't exist despite him having made millions from peddling in it; his viewers are too f'ing stupid to realize this. 
    I can't for the life of me get into the head of someone who would watch him or hannity. 
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • HobbesHobbes Pacific NorthwestPosts: 5,083
    Throw Ingraham into the mix. She's calling to defund the military. Support the troops?
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,450
    Hobbes said:
    Throw Ingraham into the mix. She's calling to defund the military. Support the troops?
    I used to listen to Ingraham in the 90's.  She was not this wackadoo that you hear today.  That was also when Hannity was somewhat palatable?  No, I take that back, he never was.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 22,734
    Hobbes said:
    Throw Ingraham into the mix. She's calling to defund the military. Support the troops?
    I used to listen to Ingraham in the 90's.  She was not this wackadoo that you hear today.  That was also when Hannity was somewhat palatable?  No, I take that back, he never was.
    Even when it was Hannity and Colmes?


  • cincybearcatcincybearcat Posts: 15,013
    So now General Mark Milley is in the cross hairs of the GOP. 

    Good stuff,. 


    Looks like all that talk about supporting the troops holds about as much water as blue lives matter when it comes down to brass tacks. 

    It's pretty disgusting how a large portion of the party no longer has principles.
    hippiemom = goodness
  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 6,052
    Hobbes said:
    Throw Ingraham into the mix. She's calling to defund the military. Support the troops?
    Sooooo much respect for American troops…

    https://twitter.com/slade/status/979414948785852417?s=21



  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,075
    Her brother eviscerates her character regularly on twitter. apparently her whole family fucking hates her. 
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • Merkin BallerMerkin Baller Posts: 6,052
    So much gets lost & forgotten in this f’ing news cycle…. It was only a month ago that conservative media lost their mind when VEEP’s Twitter account told people to enjoy their Memorial Day weekend. 
  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 28,822
    So much gets lost & forgotten in this f’ing news cycle…. It was only a month ago that conservative media lost their mind when VEEP’s Twitter account told people to enjoy their Memorial Day weekend. 
    They've all, except for a very small few, sold their souls. And its only going to get worse. Much worse.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 28,822
    All you have to do is watch OANN and there/their/they're main correspondent talk about shooting people for punishment for throwing the election to Biden. Which people? Poll workers, county election officials, tens of thousands who cast more than one ballot or voted for a dead person. He accused them of treason and what the punishment for treason was during the Founders' time. You think it can't happen here? What was the main cause of the slaughter in Rwanda? Think about it. These fucks are playing a very dangerous game with the deplorables eager to do there/their/they're bidding. A few more heat waves, a couple million more guns, sprinkle in post pandemic economic/employment woes, continued demonization of all things necessary for a functioning society, a heap of white rage and presto, you've got the second coming and POOTWH climbing the dais.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 28,450
    mrussel1 said:
    Hobbes said:
    Throw Ingraham into the mix. She's calling to defund the military. Support the troops?
    I used to listen to Ingraham in the 90's.  She was not this wackadoo that you hear today.  That was also when Hannity was somewhat palatable?  No, I take that back, he never was.
    Even when it was Hannity and Colmes?


    Colmes was a heel though and that's why he left.  Poor guy never really could get much in as I remember but did watch for what he had to say because he was smart.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 22,734
    mrussel1 said:
    Hobbes said:
    Throw Ingraham into the mix. She's calling to defund the military. Support the troops?
    I used to listen to Ingraham in the 90's.  She was not this wackadoo that you hear today.  That was also when Hannity was somewhat palatable?  No, I take that back, he never was.
    Even when it was Hannity and Colmes?


    Colmes was a heel though and that's why he left.  Poor guy never really could get much in as I remember but did watch for what he had to say because he was smart.
    That was the Family Guy joke.. always ended with droopy dog saying.. "I guess you're right Sean"...
  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 28,822
    Sad. Pathetic. Deplorable. About sum it up?
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 28,822
    Deathsantis and the money grab. At least feign some concern and ability to direct a response. How fickle and hopeless. And yo, hes got eyes on the prize.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/govrondesantis/status/1408572783597076485
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 9,102
    The Qop platform is very simple...

    Fear
    Hate
    Ignorance
    Lies
    Racism
    Xenophopobia
    Repeat
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 22,680
     
    In Georgia, Herschel Walker puts GOP in a holding pattern
    By BILL BARROW
    Today

    ATLANTA (AP) — The recently ousted former senator who wants her job back. A football hero considering his first run for office. Little-known politicians eyeing promotions. And a former president overshadowing them all in a state he lost last November.

    Republicans’ U.S. Senate nomination in a premier battleground like Georgia is a plum political prize, but a year before GOP voters choose a nominee for the 2022 midterms, they have no clear options. That leaves some power players worried about the party’s chances to defeat freshman Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock as they try to reclaim a Senate majority.

    The glaring unknown as potential contenders consider their plans: whether political neophyte Herschel Walker will enter the race with the endorsement of his close friend, Donald Trump. Walker was a beloved Heisman Trophy winner for the University of Georgia and retired professional football star who played in the short-lived U.S. Football League when Trump was a team owner in the 1980s. Now, Trump is the former president who has divided Georgia Republicans with promises of vengeance against those he insists didn’t do enough to help him overturn his defeat.

    Together, they may be the most popular duo among Georgia Republicans.

    Walker, who has joined in Trump’s false assertions that the 2020 election was fraudulent, has stoked chatter about a Senate bid for months and discussed the race with national party leaders including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Florida Sen. Rick Scott, head of the GOP’s Senate campaign committee.

    Trump has publicly encouraged Walker to enter the primary.

    Walker, who recently attended Trump’s private birthday celebration, has not indicated when he’ll announce a decision. But the mere possibility of him running is enough to leave other would-be candidates in a holding pattern in a state where Democratic victories in 2020 highlighted Republicans’ narrow margin of error.

    The GOP bench most notably includes former Sen. Kelly Loeffler, who lost a to Warnock in a January special election runoff, and U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter, a four-term congressman from near Savannah who has never run statewide.

    Eric Tanenblatt, a top national Republican fundraiser and a principal at the law firm Dentons, called the GOP indecision “unfortunate” and warned that Warnock, the first Black senator from Georgia, will be a “formidable candidate” with a fundraising head start and no significant primary opposition as he seeks his first full Senate term.

    “I guess my hope is that if Herschel does it, he decides to do it sooner than later,” Tanenblatt said. “You have people waiting to jump on board, but it almost becomes a little too late.”

    Walker, 59, stirred fresh speculation about a Senate bid with a recent social media post showing the longtime Texas resident beside a car with a Georgia license plate. In the video, Walker declared himself “ready” to “run with the big dogs.” But he has not set up any visible political operation in Georgia, and it’s still not clear he’s re-established residency in his home state. He had no presence at the annual state Republican convention or district and county conventions earlier this spring, leaving some Republicans frustrated.

    “You’ve got to get out there and meet people, and it takes time to do that” in an expansive, populous state, said Jack Kingston, a former south Georgia congressman and 2014 Senate candidate. “Republican primary voters get mad easily if you don’t come to their events, even if you’re Herschel Walker.”

    That’s a contrast to a handful of declared candidates, led by Gary Black, the longtime state agriculture commissioner, and would-be candidates like Loeffler and Carter.

    Loeffler, who had been the Senate’s wealthiest member, has traveled the state since her defeat to pitch her new political organization, Greater Georgia. She bills it as a conservative retort to Democrat Stacey Abrams’ Fair Fight group.

    The former senator also met recently with McConnell to talk about running again. A Republican close to Loeffler described the conversation as encouraging and suggested McConnell is intrigued by Loeffler’s ability to self-fund. The Republican spoke on condition of anonymity to speak frankly about Loeffler’s plans.

    To be sure, national Republican leaders are not clamoring publicly for a Walker candidacy. The National Republican Senatorial Committee, which Florida’s Scott leads, has no plans to take sides in any open primary, according to aides. McConnell, who has his own political operation and fundraising network, has made no such commitment.

    Loeffler and Carter, meanwhile, are already deferring to the potential celebrity candidate: Carter has said publicly he wouldn’t run if Walker does, and Loeffler’s allies say it remains unlikely she’d be willing to tangle with him either.

    Still, that doesn’t mean Republicans are ready for a coronation.

    “Herschel is the ultimate wild card -- high upside, but plenty of risk,” said Chip Lake, a Republican strategist in Georgia and around the South.

    Randy Evans, a Georgia Republican and U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg under Trump, argued that Walker, who is Black, could expand the GOP’s appeal among Black votes in a general election, denting a Democratic advantage that helped elect Warnock. Other Republican players say that notion is exaggerated.

    In the smoothest scenario, Walker would leverage his statewide fame and business success — he owns a Georgia-based poultry supplier, among other interests — to bridge the gap between the Trump's strident base and the more moderate middle that helped tilt Georgia to Democrats in 2020.

    “If Hershel runs, Donald Trump will come to Georgia as many times as Herschel will have him,” Evans predicted.

    Tanenblatt countered: “That cuts both ways.”

    Indeed, Walker could sail through a primary as Trump’s preferred choice but fall short in November in the Atlanta suburbs where the former president’s imprimatur is a liability and where Republicans lost electoral votes and two U.S. Senate seats.

    “There are traditional Republicans and donors who are still salty about losing those Senate seats, and they blame the president,” said Tanenblatt.

    Then there are the worst-case scenarios some Republicans muse about privately: Walker could simply wilt under the pressures of a nationalized campaign. He has written previously about his struggles with mental illness and likely would have to discuss that again, while also facing scrutiny on policy matters he’s never had to address in detail. He could end up either a weak nominee or a primary flame-out who leaves the GOP scrambling for an alternative.

    “This whole thing just captures the issue for Republicans right now in Georgia,” said Lake. “We have a whole lot of Republicans who love Donald Trump and everyone who supports him. And we have a faction that just wants to move on. To win, we have to get those two groups to vote for the same person without realizing it. Can Herschel Walker or anybody else do that?”


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 22,680
     
    Image
    Credit...Illustration by Arsh Raziuddin, The New York Times; Photography, via Getty

    Opinion

    The Cruel Logic of the Republican Party, Before and After Trump

    By Adam Serwer

    Mr. Serwer is a staff writer at The Atlantic and the author of the forthcoming “The Cruelty Is the Point: The Past, Present, and Future of Trump’s America.”

    • June 26, 2021, 11:21 a.m. ET

    Donald Trump has claimed credit for any number of things he benefited from but did not create, and the Republican Party’s reigning ideology is one of them: a politics of cruelty and exclusion that strategically exploits vulnerable Americans by portraying them as an existential threat, against whom acts of barbarism and disenfranchisement become not only justified but worthy of celebration. This approach has a long history in American politics. The most consistent threat to our democracy has always been the drive of some leaders to restrict its blessings to a select few.

    This is why Joe Biden beat Mr. Trump but has not vanquished Trumpism. Mr. Trump’s main innovation was showing Republicans how much they could get away with, from shattering migrant families and banning Muslim travelers to valorizing war crimes and denigrating African, Latino and Caribbean immigrants as being from “shithole countries.” Republicans have responded with zeal, even in the aftermath of his loss, with Republican-controlled legislatures targeting constituencies they identify either with Democrats or with the rapid cultural change that conservatives hope to arrest. The most significant for democracy, however, are the election laws designed to insulate Republican power from a diverse American majority that Republicans fear no longer supports them. The focus on Mr. Trump’s — admittedly shocking — idiosyncrasies has obscured the broader logic of this strategy.

    After more than a decade in which Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton provided fruitful targets for an audience fearful of cultural change, conservative media has struggled to turn the older white president who goes to Mass every Sunday into a compelling villain. Yet the apocalypse remains nigh, threatened by the presence of those Americans they consider unworthy of the name.

    On Fox News, hosts warn that Democrats want to “replace the current electorate” with “more obedient voters from the third world.” In outlets like National Review, columnists justify disenfranchisement of liberal constituencies on the grounds that “it would be far better if the franchise were not exercised by ignorant, civics-illiterate people.” Trumpist redoubts like the Claremont Institute publish hysterical jeremiads warning that “most people living in the United States today — certainly more than half — are not Americans in any meaningful sense of the term.”

    Under such an ideology, depriving certain Americans of their fundamental rights is not wrong but praiseworthy, because such people are usurpers.

    *

    The origin of this politics can arguably be found in the aftermath of the Civil War, when Radical Republicans sought to build a multiracial democracy from the ashes of the Confederacy. That effort was destroyed when white Southerners severed emancipated Black Americans from the franchise, eliminating the need to win their votes or respect their rights. The founders had embedded protections for slavery in the Constitution, but it was only after the abolition war, during what the historian Eric Foner calls the Second Founding, that nonracial citizenship became possible.

    The former Confederates had failed to build a slave empire, but they would not accept the demise of white man’s government. As the former Confederate general and subsequent six-term senator from Alabama John T. Morgan wrote in 1890, democratic sovereignty in America was conferred upon “qualified voters,” and Black men, whom he accused of “hatred and ill will toward their former owners,” did not qualify and were destroying democracy by their mere participation. Disenfranchising them, therefore, was not merely justified but an act of self-defense protecting democracy against “Negro domination.”

    In order to wield power as they wanted, without having to appeal to Black men for their votes, the Democratic Party and its paramilitary allies adopted a theory of liberty and democracy premised on exclusion. Such a politics must constantly maintain the ramparts between the despised and the elevated. This requires fresh acts of cruelty not only to remind everyone of their proper place but also to sustain the sense of impending doom that justifies these acts.

    As the historian C. Vann Woodward wrote, years after the end of Reconstruction, Southern Democrats engaged in “intensive propaganda of white supremacy, Negrophobia and race chauvinism” to purge Black men from politics forever, shattering emerging alliances between white and Black workers. This was ruthless opportunism, but it also forged a community defined by the color line and destroyed one that might have transcended it.

    The Radical Republicans believed the ballot would be the ultimate defense against white supremacy. The reverse was also true: Severed from that defense, Black voters were disarmed. Without Black votes at stake, the party of Lincoln was no longer motivated to defend Black rights.

    *

    Contemporary Republicans are far less violent and racist than the Democrats of the Reconstruction era and the Gilded Age. But they have nevertheless adopted the same political logic, that the victories of the rival party are illegitimate, wrought by fraud, coercion or the support of ignorant voters who are not truly American. It is no coincidence that Mr. Obama’s rise to power began with a lyrical tribute to all that red and blue states had in common and that Mr. Trump’s began with him saying Mr. Obama was born in Kenya.

    In this environment, cruelty — in the form of demonizing religious and ethnic minorities as terroristscriminals and invaders — is an effective political tool for crushing one’s enemies as well as for cultivating a community that conceives of fellow citizens as a threat, resident foreigners attempting to supplant “real” Americans. For those who believe this, it is no violation of American or democratic principles to disenfranchise, marginalize and dispossess those who never should have had such rights to begin with, people you are convinced want to destroy you.

    Their conviction in this illegitimacy is intimately tied to the Democratic Party’s reliance on Black votes. As Mr. Trump announced in November, “Detroit and Philadelphia — known as two of the most corrupt political places anywhere in our country, easily — cannot be responsible for engineering the outcome of a presidential race.” The Republican Party maintains this conviction despite Mr. Trump’s meaningful gains among voters of color in 2020.

    Even as Republicans seek to engineer state and local election rules in their favor, they accuse the Democrats of attempting to rig elections by ensuring the ballot is protected. Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, who encouraged the mob that attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6 with his claims that the 2020 election had been stolen, tells brazen falsehoods proclaiming that voting rights measures will “register millions of illegal aliens to vote” and describes them as “Jim Crow 2.0.”

    But there are no Democratic proposals to disenfranchise Republicans. There are no plans to deny gun owners the ballot, to disenfranchise white men without a college education, to consolidate rural precincts to make them unreachable. This is not because Democrats or liberals are inherently less cruel. It is because parties reliant on diverse coalitions to wield power will seek to win votes rather than suppress them.

    These kinds of falsehoods cannot be contested on factual grounds because they represent ideological beliefs about who is American and who is not and therefore who can legitimately wield power. The current Democratic administration is as illegitimate to much of the Republican base as the Reconstruction governments were to Morgan.

    *

    This brand of white identity politics can be defeated. In the 1930s, a coalition of labor unions, urban liberals and Northern Black voters turned the Democratic Party from one of the nation’s oldest white supremacist political institutions — an incubator of terrorists and bandits, united by stunning acts of racist cruelty against Black Americans in the South — into the party of civil rights. This did not happen because Democratic Party leaders picked up tomes on racial justice, embraced jargon favored by liberal academics or were struck by divine light. It happened because an increasingly diverse constituency, one they were reliant on to wield power, forced them to.

    That realignment shattered the one-party system of the Jim Crow South and ushered in America’s fragile experiment in multiracial democracy since 1965. The lesson is that politicians change when their means of holding power change and even the most authoritarian political organization can become devoted to democracy if forced to.

    With their fragile governing trifecta, Democrats have a brief chance to make structural changes that would even the playing field and help push Republicans to reach beyond their hard-core base to wield power, like adding states to the union, repairing the holes the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts blew in the Voting Rights Act, preventing state governments from subverting election results and ending partisan control over redistricting. Legislation like the PRO Act would spur unionization and the cross-racial working-class solidarity that comes with it. Such reforms would make Republican efforts to restrict the electorate less appealing and effective and pressure the party to cease its radicalization against democracy.

    We know this can work because of the lessons of not only history but also the present: In states like Maryland and Massachusetts, where the politics of cruelty toward the usual targets of Trumpist vitriol would be self-sabotaging, Republican politicians choose a different path.

    The ultimate significance of the Trump era in American history is still being written. If Democrats fail to act in the face of Republican efforts to insulate their power from voters, they will find themselves attempting to compete for an unrepresentative slice of the electorate, leaving the vulnerable constituencies on whom they currently rely without effective representation and democratic means of self-defense that the ballot provides.

    As long as Republicans are able to maintain a system in which they can rely on the politics of white identity, as the Democratic Party once did, their politics will revolve around cruelty, rooted in attempts to legislate their opponents out of existence or to use the state to crush communities associated with them. Americans will always have strong disagreements about matters such as the role of the state, the correct approach to immigration and the place of religion in public life. But the only way to diminish the politics of cruelty is to make them less rewarding.

    Adam Serwer (@AdamSerwer) is a staff writer at The Atlantic and the author of the forthcoming “The Cruelty Is the Point: The Past, Present and Future of Trump’s America.”

    The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: [email protected].

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  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon HeadstoniaPosts: 28,075
    now bill barr is being labelled "RINO" because he comes out saying Trump's election fraud claims are bullshit. I LOVE LOVE LOVE how this party is eating itself. LOL
    (Track 10 of The Headstones' Nickels For Your Nightmares)


  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 22,680
    running to replace Portman.....

    Josh Mandel's staff quit campaign because of toxic work environment created by staffer in relationship with Mandel, sources say

    Laura A. Bischoff Haley BeMiller
    The Columbus Dispatch
    Josh Mandel is making his third run for US Senate

    At least two of the three fundraisers who quit Josh Mandel's U.S. Senate campaign in recent months did so because of a toxic work environment created by Rachel Wilson, the campaign finance director, said two sources close to the situation.

    Wilson cussed out her subordinates, often demanded 12-hour workdays, berated them in front of others and called them names, said the sources, who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of retribution and career damage.

    Wilson did not return a phone call seeking comment, but the campaign responded via email to questions from the USA TODAY Network Ohio Bureau. Mandel and Wilson have been dating one another since August 2020, campaign manager Scott Guthrie said in an email.

    One source said neither Mandel nor Guthrie stopped Wilson’s behavior even though both were aware of it for weeks. Finance staff members cried in the office on a regular basis, the source said.

    Texts exchanged among Mandel campaign staff and reviewed by USA TODAY Network Ohio reporters confirm that Guthrie and Mandel knew of Wilson’s behavior but did not intervene.

    The source said Mandel and Wilson had blow-out arguments often laced with obscenities over campaign-related issues. "They’d go out in the hallway and scream at each other," the source said.

    The Mandel campaign declined to discuss the staff departures and allegations against Wilson. 

    "This is a process question and we don’t go into internal campaign processes," Guthrie said. "We wish them the very best."

    U.S. Senate Race:Who is running for Ohio's U.S. Senate seat to replace Rob Portman?

    More:Ohio Senate race takes backseat at Trump rally

    Mandel and Wilson are unmarried but as the candidate, Mandel is one of Wilson's bosses.

    Guthrie said the two started dating in August 2020, months before Sen. Rob Portman revealed he would not seek reelection. Mandel launched his Senate bid just weeks after Portman's January announcement and is vying for the GOP nomination against several other Republicans. 

    "They are both single adults and try their best to keep their private lives private," Guthrie said.

    Fundraisers Falicia Mandel, Abby Burke and Rachel Tilson all left the campaign this spring. Tilson and Burke quit on the same day — May 13. The fundraisers did not return messages seeking comment.

    Three sources said Wilson has a track record of creating conflict with subordinates and co-workers. 

    "Working with Rachel, she very much created a traumatic and hostile work environment," one said. 

    In October 2017, Wilson was caught pushing the camera of an Ohio Democratic Party tracker who was following Mandel on the campaign trail. It is an unwritten rule that trackers and campaign staff do not physically interfere with one another.

    Josh Mandel campaign staffer Rachel Wilson pushed away the camera of a Democratic tracker in October 2017 violating an unwritten no physical contact rule between campaigns and trackers

    Wilson has worked in Ohio political fundraising since early 2017, starting out on Mandel’s U.S. Senate race against Sherrod Brown. Mandel later dropped out of the race in January 2018, citing his then-wife’s undisclosed health issues.

    He and his wife divorced in April 2020.

    Earlier:Josh Mandel drops out of 2018 Senate race's shocking 2018 exit had Republicans concerned. And they don't have much time to replace him.

    Wilson then joined Jim Renacci's Senate campaign for a few months but left to move back to Texas, Renacci said. Renacci, who jumped into the 2018 Senate race after Mandel bowed out, lost to Brown.

    While the Mandel campaign released what it described as the divorce file, the case remains sealed in Ashland County where the couple filed. The Cincinnati Enquirer is seeking to unseal the records.

    Laura Bischoff and Haley BeMiller are reporters for the USA TODAY Network Ohio Bureau, which serves the Columbus Dispatch, Cincinnati Enquirer, Akron Beacon Journal and 18 other affiliated news organizations across Ohio.


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

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    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 22,680
     
    Joining Trump at border, GOP congressman eyes path to power
    By BRIAN SLODYSKO
    Today

    WASHINGTON (AP) — At the invitation of Donald Trump, Indiana Rep. Jim Banks recently led a small group of House Republicans to the former president’s New Jersey golf club, where they dined on beef tenderloin, posed for photos and briefed him on strategy for the 2022 midterm elections.

    Banks tweeted a picture of himself and Trump grinning widely while flashing a thumbs-up after the session in June. “It was entirely focused on the future of the Republican Party,” he said.

    Whatever that future may hold, the 41-year-old Banks is working aggressively to play a prominent role in it. A politician with mountaintop ambition, he is rising in the ranks of the House Republicans — and in the estimation of the mercurial Trump.

    Banks' overnight trip to Trump's Bedminster resort punctuated a political journey from a county council seat in small-town northeast Indiana to prominence in Congress in little more than a decade. It also served as a testament to the conversion Banks underwent from Trump critic to unapologetic supporter.

    Recently selected to lead the Republican Study Committee, a powerful voting bloc that includes most members of the House Republican conference, Banks is now tasked with crafting a policy agenda that bridges mainstream, Reagan-era conservatism and Trump’s grievance-driven populism. If successful, it’s a project that could catapult Banks higher in the House leadership.

    On Wednesday, Banks was invited to join Trump for a tour of the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley, where the former president was expected to rail against illegal immigration.

    “Jim understands there’s no future for the Republican Party without Trump supporters. But he also understands traditional movement conservative principles need to have a future,” said Luke Messer, a former Indiana congressman who retired in 2019 after a failed Senate run. “He is trying to work both halves of that equation and his colleagues recognize his talent.”

    Like other Republican strivers, including New York Rep. Elise Stefanik, the No. 3 ranking member of the House GOP, his evolution was swift.

    Banks supported special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the Trump campaign's potential ties to Russia and once said that “America deserved better” after a video emerged of Trump discussing sexually grabbing women without their consent.

    He now says Trump's 2016 election was a "gift" that could make Republicans “a majority party for a long time to come.”

    While Banks has proved politically adroit in dealing with Trump, his colleagues also say he grasps policy as well.

    “There are some members of Congress who excel in the political arena and don’t do as much in the policy arena, and vice versa. But Jim is one of the rare people who do both,” said Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La., who served a previous term leading the group Banks now does.

    Figures such as Banks have a long history in Congress. So long, in fact, that a 19th century nautical term has historically been applied to their ilk.

    “He's a trimmer,” said Ross Baker, a political science professor at Rutgers University, who studies congressional history. “It means a guy who trims his sails depending on which way the wind is blowing. In his case, he is a serial trimmer.”

    Banks describes it differently.

    “I was very skeptical,” Banks said of his early views of Trump. But, Banks said, “he won me over more and more every single day by doing what he said he was going to do.”

    Banks' critics use another term: political expedience.

    “Everything Jim Banks does is based on how it will help him politically,” said Gary Snyder, a Republican-turned-Democrat who writes a politics newsletter in Indiana. The two were close earlier in Banks' political career before a falling out when Snyder’s wife ran against Banks as a libertarian in 2016.

    “He’s cunning and manipulative. But he plays the game very well,” Snyder said.

    Banks’ beginnings trace to a trailer park in Columbia City, Indiana, near Fort Wayne. His father worked as an axle-maker for the Dana Corp., while his mother cooked in a nursing home. The family was largely apolitical, Banks has said, though his parents did vote for Democrats. Like much of Indiana, by the time Banks was elected to Congress on the same night Trump won the presidency, his father had become a convert.

    “My dad could not have cared as much about (my election) as he did about Donald Trump becoming president,” Banks fondly recalls at GOP dinners in Indiana.

    Banks, the first in his family to go to college, got his initial taste of politics when he joined the Indiana University College Republicans. That's where he met his wife, Amanda. Afterward, he went to work for now-former Indiana Rep. John Hostettler, then honed his political instincts working on mostly unsuccessful campaigns in Ohio, Indiana and Colorado.

    “You always learn more when you lose,” Banks said. He later got a “real job” working for a construction business before he and his wife had the first of their three daughters. His political ascent began when he became GOP chairman of Whitley County and later secured a spot on the county’s council.

    He launched a bid for the Indiana state Senate two years later. Party insiders quickly took note.

    A veteran state representative had signaled interest in the vacant seat, and Banks said he would only run if the legislator did not, the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette reported. Behind the scenes, however, Banks was working to outmaneuver the potential rival. Banks asked Snyder, then a blogger, to convey a message: stand down or face a tough primary.

    “I basically went to the guy and said, ‘Jim wants you to step aside. He’ll help you run for state representative instead.’ And that’s basically what happened,” said Snyder.

    Later in the race, Banks would tip Snyder off to the actions of another rival, asking Snyder to write negative blog posts about the candidate, according to emails provided to The Associated Press.

    One email passed along a list of mocking instances in which Banks' opponent used poor grammar. Another asked Snyder to write a critical post noting that the rival was sending campaign materials to people with government email addresses, giving the appearance of inappropriate co-mingling of political and official business.

    Banks said the campaign was a “long time ago” but he did not deny the account. His former opponent, Tom Wall, said the two made amends long ago.

    “I like the guy. I pray for him all the time,” said Wall. “Don’t tell him too much of this or his head will swell too much, but I am so proud of him when I see him on Fox News.”

    Like many politicians with an eye on higher office, Banks also saw value in a military credential. In his early 30s, Banks was accepted into the Navy Supply Corps, a program focused on supply chain management. He was commissioned as a reserve officer in November 2012.

    In 2014, after his third daughter was a born, Banks deployed to Afghanistan for eight months. Amanda Banks was appointed to fill his state Senate seat. During his deployment he tweeted photos of himself meeting Republican Sens. Lindsay Graham of South Carolina and Ben Sasse of Nebraska.

    When Banks returned, a film crew was on hand to catch the family's reunion. The footage was used in political ads after he formally began his campaign for Congress three weeks later. His combat boots were put on prominent display at his kickoff event.

    “A lot of families go through that over and over again, a lot more than my family did,” said Banks, who disputed any suggestion that politics were a factor in his decision to join, calling it "offensive to anyone who has served."

    He won a tight primary race with the help of the conservative group Club for Growth, which spent more than $250,000 on ads. The hard-line House Freedom Caucus spent $100,000 supporting his bid, though he ultimately chose not join the group.

    Nearly half of the campaign cash he has raised since has come from trade associations and corporate political actions committees, a source of money that winnowed after Banks' voted against certifying Joe Biden's presidential election victory on Jan. 6, when a mob of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol.

    Banks says corporate money is no longer needed in the party of Trump.

    “For most of my time in Republican Party politics, we've heard the mantra that Republicans are the party of Big Business,” he said. “That paradigm has shifted. Now Joe Biden and Democrats' top donors are Wall Street and big tech companies and Republicans' donors base are small-dollar working-class voters.”

    Banks has cultivated a close relationship with House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy of California. And he played a prominent public role building the GOP's case for ousting Rep. Liz Cheney, a Wyoming congresswoman who was booted from her No. 3 spot in the House leadership in May.

    “The reason you and I are talking about Liz Cheney,” Banks told Fox News is “she has failed in her mission as the chief spokesperson of our party.”

    But he's also won over other influential members in the House Republican caucus.

    “I’m a serious legislator and I appreciate other people who are serious legislators,” said Rep. Mike Rogers, of Alabama, the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee. ”We have some people in this town who all they want to do is chase TV cameras — and that’s not Jim."

    Banks' rise echoes that of another Indiana congressman who parlayed his leadership of the Republican Study Committee to reach broader prominence: former Vice President Mike Pence.

    “Jim Banks wants to be influential,” said Andy Downs, a professor of political science at Purdue University Fort Wayne. “If Jim Banks decides that his (House seat) is an office from which he wants to do things, he’s in a position to be influential for decades to come.”


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 22,734
    Darth Rumsfeld dies at 88.
  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 28,822
    mrussel1 said:
    Darth Rumsfeld dies at 88.
    Can he be tried in absentia?
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

    "If you're looking down on someone, it better be to extend them a hand to lift them up."

    Libtardaplorable©. And proud of it.

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