D-Day at 75

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  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 6,400
    The mystery of Yang Kyoungjong, the only soldier to have fought on three sides of a war
    https://nationalpost.com/news/world/the-mystery-of-yang-kyoungjong-the-only-soldier-to-have-fought-on-three-sides-of-a-war?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR3DzDelY-PAryUymkcrWZ1PErWugBhNOMlTpeH3d46SR56p8dbDWqSMso8#Echobox=1559828227

    True or not, Yang Kyoungjong’s unwitting journey from Korea, to Northern China, to Ukraine and finally to France is a perfect representation of just how sprawling the Second World War was, and how so many people’s lives were changed and displaced forever.

  • Spiritual_ChaosSpiritual_Chaos Posts: 13,300

    What was the reson canada joined in? As soon as Pearl harbour like the states? A ”brother”-act? 

    Or How did that come about. To be honest from school (here) you sort of forget canada was one of the four ”squadrons” (or Whatever one would call it) (2 american, 1 british and 1 canadian right?) on that coast. 
    The man they call my enemy. I've seen his eyes, he looks just like me - A mirror...
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 6,400
    edited June 6

    What was the reson canada joined in? As soon as Pearl harbour like the states? A ”brother”-act? 

    Or How did that come about. To be honest from school (here) you sort of forget canada was one of the four ”squadrons” (or Whatever one would call it) (2 american, 1 british and 1 canadian right?) on that coast. 
    We followed Britain into the war.  Even though we gained independence over our foreign policy in 1931?  I think Canada felt they it was her duty to support Britain.  We are still a part British Colony, someday, some PM will decide it's time to end being part of the British Colony, at least that's my hope.  For a country like ours that had a small population at the time, we were active in every theatre of the war.  I believe at the conclusion of WW2 we had the 4th largest Navy...

    The British had Sword Beach and Gold Beach, Canada had Juno...Juno and Gold were the only beaches linked at the end of day 1.


    Post edited by Meltdown99 on
  • Spiritual_ChaosSpiritual_Chaos Posts: 13,300

    What was the reson canada joined in? As soon as Pearl harbour like the states? A ”brother”-act? 

    Or How did that come about. To be honest from school (here) you sort of forget canada was one of the four ”squadrons” (or Whatever one would call it) (2 american, 1 british and 1 canadian right?) on that coast. 
    We followed Britain into the war.  Even though we gained independence over our foreign policy in 1931?  I think Canada felt they it was her duty to support Britain.  We are still a part British Colony, someday, some PM will decide it's time to end being part of the British Colony, at least that's my hope.  For a country like ours that had a small population at the time, we were active in every theatre of the war.  I believe at the conclusion of WW2 we had the 4th largest Navy...

    The British had Sword Beach and Gold Beach, Canada had Juno...Juno and Gold were the only beaches linked at the end of day 1.


    Ah ok. Cool. 
    The man they call my enemy. I've seen his eyes, he looks just like me - A mirror...
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 27,274
    OK, so here are a few brief stories about my father in WWII

    One of the most interesting things about my Pop's involvement is that it was somewhat ironic.  My father was full blooded Amish but went to great lengths to be accepted into service.  Amish people are generally pacifistic, but my Pop felt strongly about serving in WWII.  He volunteered, but was initially reject due to having flat feet.   So every day for a few weeks he rubbed dirt around the edges of his feet to give them color such that they looked normal and then went to a different recruiting station in a different town and was accepted into the U.S. Navy. 

    The other ironic thing is that Amish people generally avoid technology and yet my father trained to become an aviation machinists mate and was shipped of to the Soloman Islands where he served on a small landing strip on one of the islands.  I asked him what part of the planes did he work on and he said, "Everything from the propeller to the tail."  After the war he went on to become, first, a draftsman for Ampex (they made great reel to reel tape recorders), and after that became an aeronautical engineer for United Air Lines.

    His outfit was bombed by Japanese planes from time to time, sending him and his buddies diving into fox holes.  Somehow, they all managed to survive.  He told me though, that one night he had been dreaming that a "Jap" had cut his arm off.  He woke up and couldn't feel his arm and thought it really had been cut off.  But it turns out he slept on it and it went numb.  So he made it through those years unscathed.

    Guys weren't supposed to take photographs over there but one of my Pop's buddies had a camera and film and managed to acquire the chemicals needed to develop the photos.  Here is one of those photographs (my father is the man on the far left):



    "The answer is never the answer.  What's really interesting is the mystery.  If you seek the mystery instead of the answer, you'll always be seeking."
    -Ken Kesey
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.






  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 6,400

  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 12,418
    edited June 6
    brianlux said:
    OK, so here are a few brief stories about my father in WWII

    One of the most interesting things about my Pop's involvement is that it was somewhat ironic.  My father was full blooded Amish but went to great lengths to be accepted into service.  Amish people are generally pacifistic, but my Pop felt strongly about serving in WWII.  He volunteered, but was initially reject due to having flat feet.   So every day for a few weeks he rubbed dirt around the edges of his feet to give them color such that they looked normal and then went to a different recruiting station in a different town and was accepted into the U.S. Navy. 

    The other ironic thing is that Amish people generally avoid technology and yet my father trained to become an aviation machinists mate and was shipped of to the Soloman Islands where he served on a small landing strip on one of the islands.  I asked him what part of the planes did he work on and he said, "Everything from the propeller to the tail."  After the war he went on to become, first, a draftsman for Ampex (they made great reel to reel tape recorders), and after that became an aeronautical engineer for United Air Lines.

    His outfit was bombed by Japanese planes from time to time, sending him and his buddies diving into fox holes.  Somehow, they all managed to survive.  He told me though, that one night he had been dreaming that a "Jap" had cut his arm off.  He woke up and couldn't feel his arm and thought it really had been cut off.  But it turns out he slept on it and it went numb.  So he made it through those years unscathed.

    Guys weren't supposed to take photographs over there but one of my Pop's buddies had a camera and film and managed to acquire the chemicals needed to develop the photos.  Here is one of those photographs (my father is the man on the far left):



    Great story!  For someone to set aside pacifist beliefs to fight tyranny and evil is really heroic.  And thanks for sharing the picture.  I love seeing these young men,  teenagers even,  overseas and willing to give their lives for what we take for granted today.  
    I admit to shedding a tear or two this morning watching the news from France.  And I also admit to crying every time I watch the opening and closing scene of Ryan,  as the flags wave at the memorial.  
  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 19,617
    mrussel1 said:
    hedonist said:
    My dad left Germany in 1938 and served in WWII after receiving American citizenship and a college education.  Most of his family who stayed behind were killed (he was fortunate to somehow re-unite with his father for a brief period before my grandfather's passing).  He fought as a fucking kid in North Africa and the Battle of Salerno.  By the grace of I don't know what, he not only survived, but relished life and goodwill with gratitude until he died.  No airs about him.

    A fine, loving and funny man whom I'm lucky to have known, let alone have as a father.

    While he didn't receive reparations, his wife did - but that's another story.

    When I visited my fatherland years ago, there wasn't talk at all about the war...almost as if on purpose.  Granted, I also wasn't looking for it...although there were bars that outright made fun of Hitler and his henchmen.  Gave me a chuckle.
    Did your dad fight for the Germans or Americans? I wasn't clear from the post and comments on reparations. 
    He fought for the US, sir.

    And seeing the photo of Brian's father makes me wish I had more of the few pictures and items he saved from the war, and from his home life (I'm compelled to toss out a big fuck you to my stepmother; again, another story).
  • ponytdponytd NashvillePosts: 548
    brianlux said:
    OK, so here are a few brief stories about my father in WWII

    One of the most interesting things about my Pop's involvement is that it was somewhat ironic.  My father was full blooded Amish but went to great lengths to be accepted into service.  Amish people are generally pacifistic, but my Pop felt strongly about serving in WWII.  He volunteered, but was initially reject due to having flat feet.   So every day for a few weeks he rubbed dirt around the edges of his feet to give them color such that they looked normal and then went to a different recruiting station in a different town and was accepted into the U.S. Navy. 

    The other ironic thing is that Amish people generally avoid technology and yet my father trained to become an aviation machinists mate and was shipped of to the Soloman Islands where he served on a small landing strip on one of the islands.  I asked him what part of the planes did he work on and he said, "Everything from the propeller to the tail."  After the war he went on to become, first, a draftsman for Ampex (they made great reel to reel tape recorders), and after that became an aeronautical engineer for United Air Lines.

    His outfit was bombed by Japanese planes from time to time, sending him and his buddies diving into fox holes.  Somehow, they all managed to survive.  He told me though, that one night he had been dreaming that a "Jap" had cut his arm off.  He woke up and couldn't feel his arm and thought it really had been cut off.  But it turns out he slept on it and it went numb.  So he made it through those years unscathed.

    Guys weren't supposed to take photographs over there but one of my Pop's buddies had a camera and film and managed to acquire the chemicals needed to develop the photos.  Here is one of those photographs (my father is the man on the far left):



    that's really cool he went to those lengths to join up. Like mrussel1 said, that is really heroic. Awesome he managed to make it out unscathed too.

    mrussel1 said:

    Great story!  For someone to set aside pacifist beliefs to fight tyranny and evil is really heroic.  And thanks for sharing the picture.  I love seeing these young men,  teenagers even,  overseas and willing to give their lives for what we take for granted today.  
    I admit to shedding a tear or two this morning watching the news from France.  And I also admit to crying every time I watch the opening and closing scene of Ryan,  as the flags wave at the memorial.  
    When I was at the cemetery there 2.5 weeks ago, we got to see the flag ceremony with the 21 gun salute and playing of Taps. Even though both of those were recordings and played over the loudspeakers, it still choked me up and brought tears to my eyes. Very humbling and awesome experience.  Our tour guide said that all French schoolchildren take field trips throughout the year to the cemeteries and beaches in Normandy. I thought that was really cool.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 27,274
    hedonist said:
    mrussel1 said:
    hedonist said:
    My dad left Germany in 1938 and served in WWII after receiving American citizenship and a college education.  Most of his family who stayed behind were killed (he was fortunate to somehow re-unite with his father for a brief period before my grandfather's passing).  He fought as a fucking kid in North Africa and the Battle of Salerno.  By the grace of I don't know what, he not only survived, but relished life and goodwill with gratitude until he died.  No airs about him.

    A fine, loving and funny man whom I'm lucky to have known, let alone have as a father.

    While he didn't receive reparations, his wife did - but that's another story.

    When I visited my fatherland years ago, there wasn't talk at all about the war...almost as if on purpose.  Granted, I also wasn't looking for it...although there were bars that outright made fun of Hitler and his henchmen.  Gave me a chuckle.
    Did your dad fight for the Germans or Americans? I wasn't clear from the post and comments on reparations. 
    He fought for the US, sir.

    And seeing the photo of Brian's father makes me wish I had more of the few pictures and items he saved from the war, and from his home life (I'm compelled to toss out a big fuck you to my stepmother; again, another story).
    Bummer about your stepmother but good that you have a few pictures- no doubt treasures to you!
    "The answer is never the answer.  What's really interesting is the mystery.  If you seek the mystery instead of the answer, you'll always be seeking."
    -Ken Kesey
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.






  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 5,078
    edited June 6
    Great stories and great pictures, everyone.  That canteen is badass.  The stories of family members here are very affecting. My grandfather was a minority soldier in the Pacific.  Denied a lot of rights and status after the war because of it but he never showed that he cared and rarely talked about the war.  He was proud though.  Flew the biggest American flag near his front door for decades.

    i have quite a bit of signed Band of Brothers memorabilia.  They were paid for the autographs so it was a monetary way of saying thanks. 

    Buck Compton and Bob Noody on the way to jump over Normandy...

    Post edited by cp3iverson on
  • Spiritual_ChaosSpiritual_Chaos Posts: 13,300

    The man they call my enemy. I've seen his eyes, he looks just like me - A mirror...
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 18,974
    Awesome stories everyone!!!
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
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