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D-Day +28 124

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  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 8,488
    The mystery of Yang Kyoungjong, the only soldier to have fought on three sides of a war
    https://nationalpost.com/news/world/the-mystery-of-yang-kyoungjong-the-only-soldier-to-have-fought-on-three-sides-of-a-war?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR3DzDelY-PAryUymkcrWZ1PErWugBhNOMlTpeH3d46SR56p8dbDWqSMso8#Echobox=1559828227

    True or not, Yang Kyoungjong’s unwitting journey from Korea, to Northern China, to Ukraine and finally to France is a perfect representation of just how sprawling the Second World War was, and how so many people’s lives were changed and displaced forever.

  • Spiritual_ChaosSpiritual_Chaos Posts: 23,670

    What was the reson canada joined in? As soon as Pearl harbour like the states? A ”brother”-act? 

    Or How did that come about. To be honest from school (here) you sort of forget canada was one of the four ”squadrons” (or Whatever one would call it) (2 american, 1 british and 1 canadian right?) on that coast. 
    "Mostly I think that people react sensitively because they know you’ve got a point"
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 8,488
    edited June 2019

    What was the reson canada joined in? As soon as Pearl harbour like the states? A ”brother”-act? 

    Or How did that come about. To be honest from school (here) you sort of forget canada was one of the four ”squadrons” (or Whatever one would call it) (2 american, 1 british and 1 canadian right?) on that coast. 
    We followed Britain into the war.  Even though we gained independence over our foreign policy in 1931?  I think Canada felt they it was her duty to support Britain.  We are still a part British Colony, someday, some PM will decide it's time to end being part of the British Colony, at least that's my hope.  For a country like ours that had a small population at the time, we were active in every theatre of the war.  I believe at the conclusion of WW2 we had the 4th largest Navy...

    The British had Sword Beach and Gold Beach, Canada had Juno...Juno and Gold were the only beaches linked at the end of day 1.


    Post edited by Meltdown99 on
  • Spiritual_ChaosSpiritual_Chaos Posts: 23,670

    What was the reson canada joined in? As soon as Pearl harbour like the states? A ”brother”-act? 

    Or How did that come about. To be honest from school (here) you sort of forget canada was one of the four ”squadrons” (or Whatever one would call it) (2 american, 1 british and 1 canadian right?) on that coast. 
    We followed Britain into the war.  Even though we gained independence over our foreign policy in 1931?  I think Canada felt they it was her duty to support Britain.  We are still a part British Colony, someday, some PM will decide it's time to end being part of the British Colony, at least that's my hope.  For a country like ours that had a small population at the time, we were active in every theatre of the war.  I believe at the conclusion of WW2 we had the 4th largest Navy...

    The British had Sword Beach and Gold Beach, Canada had Juno...Juno and Gold were the only beaches linked at the end of day 1.


    Ah ok. Cool. 
    "Mostly I think that people react sensitively because they know you’ve got a point"
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 34,296
    OK, so here are a few brief stories about my father in WWII

    One of the most interesting things about my Pop's involvement is that it was somewhat ironic.  My father was full blooded Amish but went to great lengths to be accepted into service.  Amish people are generally pacifistic, but my Pop felt strongly about serving in WWII.  He volunteered, but was initially reject due to having flat feet.   So every day for a few weeks he rubbed dirt around the edges of his feet to give them color such that they looked normal and then went to a different recruiting station in a different town and was accepted into the U.S. Navy. 

    The other ironic thing is that Amish people generally avoid technology and yet my father trained to become an aviation machinists mate and was shipped of to the Soloman Islands where he served on a small landing strip on one of the islands.  I asked him what part of the planes did he work on and he said, "Everything from the propeller to the tail."  After the war he went on to become, first, a draftsman for Ampex (they made great reel to reel tape recorders), and after that became an aeronautical engineer for United Air Lines.

    His outfit was bombed by Japanese planes from time to time, sending him and his buddies diving into fox holes.  Somehow, they all managed to survive.  He told me though, that one night he had been dreaming that a "Jap" had cut his arm off.  He woke up and couldn't feel his arm and thought it really had been cut off.  But it turns out he slept on it and it went numb.  So he made it through those years unscathed.

    Guys weren't supposed to take photographs over there but one of my Pop's buddies had a camera and film and managed to acquire the chemicals needed to develop the photos.  Here is one of those photographs (my father is the man on the far left):



    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 8,488

  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 21,562
    edited June 2019
    brianlux said:
    OK, so here are a few brief stories about my father in WWII

    One of the most interesting things about my Pop's involvement is that it was somewhat ironic.  My father was full blooded Amish but went to great lengths to be accepted into service.  Amish people are generally pacifistic, but my Pop felt strongly about serving in WWII.  He volunteered, but was initially reject due to having flat feet.   So every day for a few weeks he rubbed dirt around the edges of his feet to give them color such that they looked normal and then went to a different recruiting station in a different town and was accepted into the U.S. Navy. 

    The other ironic thing is that Amish people generally avoid technology and yet my father trained to become an aviation machinists mate and was shipped of to the Soloman Islands where he served on a small landing strip on one of the islands.  I asked him what part of the planes did he work on and he said, "Everything from the propeller to the tail."  After the war he went on to become, first, a draftsman for Ampex (they made great reel to reel tape recorders), and after that became an aeronautical engineer for United Air Lines.

    His outfit was bombed by Japanese planes from time to time, sending him and his buddies diving into fox holes.  Somehow, they all managed to survive.  He told me though, that one night he had been dreaming that a "Jap" had cut his arm off.  He woke up and couldn't feel his arm and thought it really had been cut off.  But it turns out he slept on it and it went numb.  So he made it through those years unscathed.

    Guys weren't supposed to take photographs over there but one of my Pop's buddies had a camera and film and managed to acquire the chemicals needed to develop the photos.  Here is one of those photographs (my father is the man on the far left):



    Great story!  For someone to set aside pacifist beliefs to fight tyranny and evil is really heroic.  And thanks for sharing the picture.  I love seeing these young men,  teenagers even,  overseas and willing to give their lives for what we take for granted today.  
    I admit to shedding a tear or two this morning watching the news from France.  And I also admit to crying every time I watch the opening and closing scene of Ryan,  as the flags wave at the memorial.  
  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 23,314
    mrussel1 said:
    hedonist said:
    My dad left Germany in 1938 and served in WWII after receiving American citizenship and a college education.  Most of his family who stayed behind were killed (he was fortunate to somehow re-unite with his father for a brief period before my grandfather's passing).  He fought as a fucking kid in North Africa and the Battle of Salerno.  By the grace of I don't know what, he not only survived, but relished life and goodwill with gratitude until he died.  No airs about him.

    A fine, loving and funny man whom I'm lucky to have known, let alone have as a father.

    While he didn't receive reparations, his wife did - but that's another story.

    When I visited my fatherland years ago, there wasn't talk at all about the war...almost as if on purpose.  Granted, I also wasn't looking for it...although there were bars that outright made fun of Hitler and his henchmen.  Gave me a chuckle.
    Did your dad fight for the Germans or Americans? I wasn't clear from the post and comments on reparations. 
    He fought for the US, sir.

    And seeing the photo of Brian's father makes me wish I had more of the few pictures and items he saved from the war, and from his home life (I'm compelled to toss out a big fuck you to my stepmother; again, another story).
  • ponytdponytd NashvillePosts: 624
    brianlux said:
    OK, so here are a few brief stories about my father in WWII

    One of the most interesting things about my Pop's involvement is that it was somewhat ironic.  My father was full blooded Amish but went to great lengths to be accepted into service.  Amish people are generally pacifistic, but my Pop felt strongly about serving in WWII.  He volunteered, but was initially reject due to having flat feet.   So every day for a few weeks he rubbed dirt around the edges of his feet to give them color such that they looked normal and then went to a different recruiting station in a different town and was accepted into the U.S. Navy. 

    The other ironic thing is that Amish people generally avoid technology and yet my father trained to become an aviation machinists mate and was shipped of to the Soloman Islands where he served on a small landing strip on one of the islands.  I asked him what part of the planes did he work on and he said, "Everything from the propeller to the tail."  After the war he went on to become, first, a draftsman for Ampex (they made great reel to reel tape recorders), and after that became an aeronautical engineer for United Air Lines.

    His outfit was bombed by Japanese planes from time to time, sending him and his buddies diving into fox holes.  Somehow, they all managed to survive.  He told me though, that one night he had been dreaming that a "Jap" had cut his arm off.  He woke up and couldn't feel his arm and thought it really had been cut off.  But it turns out he slept on it and it went numb.  So he made it through those years unscathed.

    Guys weren't supposed to take photographs over there but one of my Pop's buddies had a camera and film and managed to acquire the chemicals needed to develop the photos.  Here is one of those photographs (my father is the man on the far left):



    that's really cool he went to those lengths to join up. Like mrussel1 said, that is really heroic. Awesome he managed to make it out unscathed too.

    mrussel1 said:

    Great story!  For someone to set aside pacifist beliefs to fight tyranny and evil is really heroic.  And thanks for sharing the picture.  I love seeing these young men,  teenagers even,  overseas and willing to give their lives for what we take for granted today.  
    I admit to shedding a tear or two this morning watching the news from France.  And I also admit to crying every time I watch the opening and closing scene of Ryan,  as the flags wave at the memorial.  
    When I was at the cemetery there 2.5 weeks ago, we got to see the flag ceremony with the 21 gun salute and playing of Taps. Even though both of those were recordings and played over the loudspeakers, it still choked me up and brought tears to my eyes. Very humbling and awesome experience.  Our tour guide said that all French schoolchildren take field trips throughout the year to the cemeteries and beaches in Normandy. I thought that was really cool.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 34,296
    hedonist said:
    mrussel1 said:
    hedonist said:
    My dad left Germany in 1938 and served in WWII after receiving American citizenship and a college education.  Most of his family who stayed behind were killed (he was fortunate to somehow re-unite with his father for a brief period before my grandfather's passing).  He fought as a fucking kid in North Africa and the Battle of Salerno.  By the grace of I don't know what, he not only survived, but relished life and goodwill with gratitude until he died.  No airs about him.

    A fine, loving and funny man whom I'm lucky to have known, let alone have as a father.

    While he didn't receive reparations, his wife did - but that's another story.

    When I visited my fatherland years ago, there wasn't talk at all about the war...almost as if on purpose.  Granted, I also wasn't looking for it...although there were bars that outright made fun of Hitler and his henchmen.  Gave me a chuckle.
    Did your dad fight for the Germans or Americans? I wasn't clear from the post and comments on reparations. 
    He fought for the US, sir.

    And seeing the photo of Brian's father makes me wish I had more of the few pictures and items he saved from the war, and from his home life (I'm compelled to toss out a big fuck you to my stepmother; again, another story).
    Bummer about your stepmother but good that you have a few pictures- no doubt treasures to you!
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 7,511
    edited June 2019
    Great stories and great pictures, everyone.  That canteen is badass.  The stories of family members here are very affecting. My grandfather was a minority soldier in the Pacific.  Denied a lot of rights and status after the war because of it but he never showed that he cared and rarely talked about the war.  He was proud though.  Flew the biggest American flag near his front door for decades.

    i have quite a bit of signed Band of Brothers memorabilia.  They were paid for the autographs so it was a monetary way of saying thanks. 

    Buck Compton and Bob Noody on the way to jump over Normandy...

    Post edited by cp3iverson on
  • Spiritual_ChaosSpiritual_Chaos Posts: 23,670

    "Mostly I think that people react sensitively because they know you’ve got a point"
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 25,102
    Awesome stories everyone!!!
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 7,511
    edited June 2020
    The bravest men in existence.  You dont see many of them around these days (all in their 90s or more at this point) but its so cool when you spot a WW2 vet.
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 7,511

    On their way to the beach 76 yrs ago this morning.... (colorized by Marina Amaral)
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 25,102
    Awesome photo cp3!
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 8,488
    Simply put these men and woman were part of  the greatest generation ... we owe them so much gratitude.

    i had many relatives serve in WW2 and a grandfather who served in WW1 and thankfully all came home and lead very productive and rewarding lives never mentioning the war.
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 7,511
    Simply put these men and woman were part of  the greatest generation ... we owe them so much gratitude.

    i had many relatives serve in WW2 and a grandfather who served in WW1 and thankfully all came home and lead very productive and rewarding lives never mentioning the war.
    Im a bit of a WW2 book worm, and the interesting thing is that in many cases these guys’ families never knew much beyond “oh yeah, Dad fought in WW2 somewhere” 

    they just came home, put it aside, and became the mailman or the shopkeeper or this or that.  Nevermind that they saw the craziest stuff of the 20th century. 
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 21,562
    edited June 2020
    Simply put these men and woman were part of  the greatest generation ... we owe them so much gratitude.

    i had many relatives serve in WW2 and a grandfather who served in WW1 and thankfully all came home and lead very productive and rewarding lives never mentioning the war.
    Im a bit of a WW2 book worm, and the interesting thing is that in many cases these guys’ families never knew much beyond “oh yeah, Dad fought in WW2 somewhere” 

    they just came home, put it aside, and became the mailman or the shopkeeper or this or that.  Nevermind that they saw the craziest stuff of the 20th century. 
    It bothered people differently.  I had one uncle who fought at the Bulge,  was captured and spent the rest of the war on a stalag.  He was okay with it. My other uncle was an island hopper marine and he definitely had PTSD,  even though they didn't call it that. 
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 7,511
    mrussel1 said:
    Simply put these men and woman were part of  the greatest generation ... we owe them so much gratitude.

    i had many relatives serve in WW2 and a grandfather who served in WW1 and thankfully all came home and lead very productive and rewarding lives never mentioning the war.
    Im a bit of a WW2 book worm, and the interesting thing is that in many cases these guys’ families never knew much beyond “oh yeah, Dad fought in WW2 somewhere” 

    they just came home, put it aside, and became the mailman or the shopkeeper or this or that.  Nevermind that they saw the craziest stuff of the 20th century. 
    It bothered people differently.  I had one uncle who fought at the Bulge,  was captured and spent the rest of the war on a stalag.  He was okay with it. My other uncle was an island hopper marine and he definitely had PTSD,  even though they didn't call it that. 
    Yeah they really had no support system for that.  No counselors or therapists.  There’s a great book i have written by the wives and kids of the 506th.  So many had emotional issues and turned to the bottle.  Still just wouldnt talk.  

  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 27,942
    mrussel1 said:
    Simply put these men and woman were part of  the greatest generation ... we owe them so much gratitude.

    i had many relatives serve in WW2 and a grandfather who served in WW1 and thankfully all came home and lead very productive and rewarding lives never mentioning the war.
    Im a bit of a WW2 book worm, and the interesting thing is that in many cases these guys’ families never knew much beyond “oh yeah, Dad fought in WW2 somewhere” 

    they just came home, put it aside, and became the mailman or the shopkeeper or this or that.  Nevermind that they saw the craziest stuff of the 20th century. 
    It bothered people differently.  I had one uncle who fought at the Bulge,  was captured and spent the rest of the war on a stalag.  He was okay with it. My other uncle was an island hopper marine and he definitely had PTSD,  even though they didn't call it that. 
    Yeah they really had no support system for that.  No counselors or therapists.  There’s a great book i have written by the wives and kids of the 506th.  So many had emotional issues and turned to the bottle.  Still just wouldnt talk.  

    When I watched Band of Brothers and watched the last episode where they scrolled through the real life character names and listed what happened to them after the war was over, I was struck by how many died in drunk driving accidents. That and some who volunteered to serve in the Pacific and were KIA. Can’t imagine it.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 23,314
    My dad talked to me about the war, its horrors, the bonds and friendships forged, the losses of his family and armed brothers, starving in foxholes, his faith during that time. He spoke with candor and never shielded the truth from me. 

    But, only when I asked.

    He wouldn’t ever share his immediate post-war work though. “You can’t tell what you don’t know.” 😬
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 8,488
    Thank you to all the brave men and woman that sacrificed so much.  Thank you to the men and woman that serve today that keep us safe.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 8,488

  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 27,942
    The original ANTIIIIIIIIIIIIFA. Funny how you don’t hear of them much nowadays.


    https://www.instagram.com/tv/CPv4v-aHmm6/?utm_medium=copy_link
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 21,321
     
    Normandy commemorates D-Day with small crowds, but big heart
    By SYLVIE CORBET
    51 mins ago

    COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France (AP) — When the sun rises over Omaha Beach, revealing vast stretches of wet sand extending toward distant cliffs, one starts to grasp the immensity of the task faced by Allied soldiers on June 6, 1944, landing on the Nazi-occupied Normandy shore.

    Several ceremonies were being held Sunday to commemorate the 77th anniversary of D-Day, the decisive assault that led to the liberation of France and western Europe from Nazi control, and honor those who fell.

    “These are the men who enabled liberty to regain a foothold on the European continent, and who in the days and weeks that followed lifted the shackles of tyranny, hedgerow by Normandy hedgerow, mile by bloody mile," Britain's ambassador to France, Lord Edward Llewellyn, said at the inauguration of a new British monument to D-Day's heroes.

    On D-Day, more than 150,000 Allied troops landed on the beaches code-named Omaha, Utah, Juno, Sword and Gold, carried by 7,000 boats. This year on June 6, the beaches stood vast and nearly empty as the sun emerged, exactly 77 years since the dawn invasion.

    For the second year in a row, anniversary commemorations are marked by virus travel restrictions that prevented veterans or families of fallen soldiers from the U.S., Britain, Canada and other Allied countries from making the trip to France. Only a few officials were allowed exceptions.

    At the newly-built British Normandy Memorial near the village of Ver-sur-Mer, bagpipes played memorial tunes and warplanes zipped overhead trailing red-white-and-blue smoke. Socially distanced participants stood in awe at the solemnity and serenity of the site, providing a spectacular and poignant view over Gold Beach and the English Channel.

    The new monument pays tribute to those under British command who died on D-Day and during the Battle of Normandy.

    A text carved on the wall writes: “They died so that Europe might be free.”

    Visitors stood to salute the more than 22,000 men and women, mostly British soldiers, whose names are etched on its stone columns. Giant screens showed D-Day veterans gathered simultaneously at Britain’s National Memorial Aboretum to watch the Normandy event remotely. Prince Charles, speaking via video link, expressed regret that he couldn't attend in person.

    On June 6, 1944, “In the heart of the mist that enveloped the Normandy Coast ... was a lightning bolt of freedom," French Defense Minister Florence Parly told the ceremony. “France does not forget. France is forever grateful.”

    Charles Shay, a Penobscot Native American who landed as an U.S. army medic on June 6, 1944 and now calls Normandy home, was the only surviving D-Day veteran at the Ver-sur-Mer ceremony.

    Another veteran of the Battle of Normandy, British Capt. David Mylchreest, was also present. He landed with his team in Normandy on June 12, 1944, to replace officers who had died in the first days of the fight.

    Shay then took part in a commemoration at the American Cemetery later in the day in Colleville-sur-Mer, on a bluff overseeing Omaha Beach, in the presence of officials from the United States, Canada, Britain, Germany and other allied countries.

    The cemetery contains 9,380 graves, most of them for servicemen who lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. Another 1,557 names are inscribed on the Walls of the Missing.

    Most public events have been canceled, and the official ceremonies were limited to a small number of selected guests and dignitaries.

    Denis van den Brink, a WWII expert working for the town of Carentan, site of a strategic battle near Utah Beach, acknowledged the “big loss, the big absence is all the veterans who couldn’t travel.”

    “That really hurts us very much because they are all around 95, 100 years old, and we hope they’re going to last forever. But, you know...” he said.

    “At least we remain in a certain spirit of commemoration, which is the most important,” he told The Associated Press.

    Over the anniversary weekend, many local residents have come out to visit the monuments marking the key moments of the fight and show their gratitude to the soldiers. French World War II history enthusiasts, and a few travelers from neighboring European countries, could also be seen in jeeps and military vehicles on the small roads of Normandy.

    Some reenactors came to Omaha Beach in the early hours of the day to pay tribute to those who fell that day, bringing flowers and American flags.

    On D-Day, 4,414 Allied troops lost their lives, 2,501 of them Americans. More than 5,000 were wounded. On the German side, several thousand were killed or wounded.

    Normandy has more than 20 military cemeteries holding mostly Americans, Germans, French, British, Canadians and Polish troops who took part in the historic battle.

    Dignitaries stressed the importance of keeping D-Day's legacy alive for future generations.

    “In the face of the threats of today, we should act together and show unity," Parly said, "so that the peace and freedom last.”

    ___

    Nicolas Garriga contributed to this report from Ver-sur-Mer.

    ___

    This story has been corrected to show that the British ambassador’s last name is Llewellyn, not Llewelyn.


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 21,562
    Day of Days
  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 23,314
    ✌️
  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 25,102
    I wonder how many DDay vets are left.  Maybe a hundred?
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 34,296
    mcgruff10 said:
    I wonder how many DDay vets are left.  Maybe a hundred?

    Growing up surrounded by men like my father and mother and aunts and uncles who all  served in one way or another here or abroad during the war, it's hard for me to imagine all of the G.I. generation folks being gone- and in my own case, all of them are gone- both parents and every last aunt and uncle.  Won't be to many years before they truly are all gone.  It reminds me of when I was a kid I had a friend who said his folks knew a woman who was the last person living to have known Abraham Lincoln.  Even my own Boomer herd are thinning out.
    Time marches on. 
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










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