Re-discovering Binaural

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Comments

  • eboweddieeboweddie Posts: 318

    i wish i wish i wish i wish, i guess it never stops
  • eboweddieeboweddie Posts: 318
    This is beyond good

    i wish i wish i wish i wish, i guess it never stops
  • thispureamericanriotthispureamericanriot CaliforniaPosts: 511
    I normally don't trust album reviews (good or bad), but looks like some publications "understood" Binaural back in 2000. NME gave it a 4.5 out of 5, saying:

    "...this is no doubt why Binaural sounds so gloriously out of time. It’s a seething, furious album; a declamatory statement against cynicism and passivity and the simple injustices of everyday life. Within its 14 tracks, Binaural sees Eddie Vedder rage against collateral damage (the blistering 'Insignificance’), conformity (the jerky post-punk splatter of ‘Grievance’), the randomness of tragedy (‘God’s Dice’). Even when the band slow the pace, the songs are colored by a heartfelt intensity; the palpable loss of the painfully beautiful ‘Light Years’, or the acrid dark-hearted humor of the slight ‘Soon Forget’, for example. This is not the work of a band playing just to pay off the mortgage on their Bel Air mansion.

    Tellingly, Binaural continues the musical progression flagged by ’96’s No Code, a post-hardcore reading of classic rock that has coursed through their music since the twin-guitar nirvana of their debut single, ‘Alive’. Indeed, opener ‘Breakerfall’ is a note-perfect aural fantasy of The Who demolishing The Byrds‘ 12-string prettiness as Vedder howls delectably Neil Young-esque lyrics above. But Pearl Jam aren’t hopeless retro-anoraks like, say, Ocean Colour SceneBinaural might recall, at different moments, The Clash, Dylan, MC5, Springsteen, Fugazi and, of course, Neil Young, but the band’s affinity with the spirit of these forbears, as well as their music, marks them out as fellow travelers, as opposed to copyists."

    Superb analysis.

  • Brisk.Brisk. Posts: 11,186
    Derrr its a fact Binaural is the best album.
  • TH113769TH113769 Posts: 268
    ^^^^^ Yes it is!!
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  • lolobugglolobugg BLUE RDGE MTNSPosts: 7,755
    I normally don't trust album reviews (good or bad), but looks like some publications "understood" Binaural back in 2000. NME gave it a 4.5 out of 5, saying:

    "...this is no doubt why Binaural sounds so gloriously out of time. It’s a seething, furious album; a declamatory statement against cynicism and passivity and the simple injustices of everyday life. Within its 14 tracks, Binaural sees Eddie Vedder rage against collateral damage (the blistering 'Insignificance’), conformity (the jerky post-punk splatter of ‘Grievance’), the randomness of tragedy (‘God’s Dice’). Even when the band slow the pace, the songs are colored by a heartfelt intensity; the palpable loss of the painfully beautiful ‘Light Years’, or the acrid dark-hearted humor of the slight ‘Soon Forget’, for example. This is not the work of a band playing just to pay off the mortgage on their Bel Air mansion.

    Tellingly, Binaural continues the musical progression flagged by ’96’s No Code, a post-hardcore reading of classic rock that has coursed through their music since the twin-guitar nirvana of their debut single, ‘Alive’. Indeed, opener ‘Breakerfall’ is a note-perfect aural fantasy of The Who demolishing The Byrds‘ 12-string prettiness as Vedder howls delectably Neil Young-esque lyrics above. But Pearl Jam aren’t hopeless retro-anoraks like, say, Ocean Colour SceneBinaural might recall, at different moments, The Clash, Dylan, MC5, Springsteen, Fugazi and, of course, Neil Young, but the band’s affinity with the spirit of these forbears, as well as their music, marks them out as fellow travelers, as opposed to copyists."

    Superb analysis.


    Nice review.

    I remember Rolling Stone at the time reviewed this album alongside Matchbox Twenty and Sisco (sp) as if any of these bands had anything in common. total hack job and lazy journalism.

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  • thispureamericanriotthispureamericanriot CaliforniaPosts: 511
    lolobugg said:
    I normally don't trust album reviews (good or bad), but looks like some publications "understood" Binaural back in 2000. NME gave it a 4.5 out of 5, saying:

    "...this is no doubt why Binaural sounds so gloriously out of time. It’s a seething, furious album; a declamatory statement against cynicism and passivity and the simple injustices of everyday life. Within its 14 tracks, Binaural sees Eddie Vedder rage against collateral damage (the blistering 'Insignificance’), conformity (the jerky post-punk splatter of ‘Grievance’), the randomness of tragedy (‘God’s Dice’). Even when the band slow the pace, the songs are colored by a heartfelt intensity; the palpable loss of the painfully beautiful ‘Light Years’, or the acrid dark-hearted humor of the slight ‘Soon Forget’, for example. This is not the work of a band playing just to pay off the mortgage on their Bel Air mansion.

    Tellingly, Binaural continues the musical progression flagged by ’96’s No Code, a post-hardcore reading of classic rock that has coursed through their music since the twin-guitar nirvana of their debut single, ‘Alive’. Indeed, opener ‘Breakerfall’ is a note-perfect aural fantasy of The Who demolishing The Byrds‘ 12-string prettiness as Vedder howls delectably Neil Young-esque lyrics above. But Pearl Jam aren’t hopeless retro-anoraks like, say, Ocean Colour SceneBinaural might recall, at different moments, The Clash, Dylan, MC5, Springsteen, Fugazi and, of course, Neil Young, but the band’s affinity with the spirit of these forbears, as well as their music, marks them out as fellow travelers, as opposed to copyists."

    Superb analysis.


    Nice review.

    I remember Rolling Stone at the time reviewed this album alongside Matchbox Twenty and Sisco (sp) as if any of these bands had anything in common. total hack job and lazy journalism.

    Why doesn't it surprise me Rolling Stone comparing Pearl Jam to Matchbox Twenty? It's like comparing Neil Young to Sugar Ray! LOL ;)
  • ledveddermanledvedderman Posts: 7,559
    lolobugg said:
    I normally don't trust album reviews (good or bad), but looks like some publications "understood" Binaural back in 2000. NME gave it a 4.5 out of 5, saying:

    "...this is no doubt why Binaural sounds so gloriously out of time. It’s a seething, furious album; a declamatory statement against cynicism and passivity and the simple injustices of everyday life. Within its 14 tracks, Binaural sees Eddie Vedder rage against collateral damage (the blistering 'Insignificance’), conformity (the jerky post-punk splatter of ‘Grievance’), the randomness of tragedy (‘God’s Dice’). Even when the band slow the pace, the songs are colored by a heartfelt intensity; the palpable loss of the painfully beautiful ‘Light Years’, or the acrid dark-hearted humor of the slight ‘Soon Forget’, for example. This is not the work of a band playing just to pay off the mortgage on their Bel Air mansion.

    Tellingly, Binaural continues the musical progression flagged by ’96’s No Code, a post-hardcore reading of classic rock that has coursed through their music since the twin-guitar nirvana of their debut single, ‘Alive’. Indeed, opener ‘Breakerfall’ is a note-perfect aural fantasy of The Who demolishing The Byrds‘ 12-string prettiness as Vedder howls delectably Neil Young-esque lyrics above. But Pearl Jam aren’t hopeless retro-anoraks like, say, Ocean Colour SceneBinaural might recall, at different moments, The Clash, Dylan, MC5, Springsteen, Fugazi and, of course, Neil Young, but the band’s affinity with the spirit of these forbears, as well as their music, marks them out as fellow travelers, as opposed to copyists."

    Superb analysis.


    Nice review.

    I remember Rolling Stone at the time reviewed this album alongside Matchbox Twenty and Sisco (sp) as if any of these bands had anything in common. total hack job and lazy journalism.

    Why doesn't it surprise me Rolling Stone comparing Pearl Jam to Matchbox Twenty? It's like comparing Neil Young to Sugar Ray! LOL ;)
    I don’t think that’s what he meant. He meant reviewing it in the same issue as those other two albums. 
  • GetRight13GetRight13 NYPosts: 387
    Binaural is my favorite album 
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  • Brisk.Brisk. Posts: 11,186
    Binaural is my favorite album 
    Why your username a riot act song then? we found an imposter ;) 
  • Gern BlanstenGern Blansten Your Mom'sPosts: 8,016
    edited August 2
    perfect followup to Yield...kills me that they don't play it much
    Remember the Thomas Nine!! (10/02/2018)

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  • tbergstbergs Posts: 5,159
    I wasn't ready for Binaural when it came out. Took me a year to fully let it sink in and appreciate the musical spectrum on it. I was just 20 at the time so I think I really wanted more aggressive rock from them yet. I thought Yield showed that they were ready to be the kings of rock again and were poised to make the nu-metal/rap rock groups crawl back in to the recesses of the music world. I wanted Grievance to be the lead single because I wanted them to come back in to the mainstream of rock radio. I would hear people writing them off and get annoyed my favorite band seemed to be fading away. Fact is, what I wanted, wasn't what the band wanted or what was best for the band. All those bands from that period eventually faded away with their cliche rock, but PJ forged on and made some great music that didn't fit the pop culture norm at the time, but to me, has remained timeless.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • thispureamericanriotthispureamericanriot CaliforniaPosts: 511
    In the haste of my original post, I missed this nice thread from 2004 that discusses The Greatness of Binaural.
  • thispureamericanriotthispureamericanriot CaliforniaPosts: 511
    Just found this recently - "Anything In Between". Great Binaural outtake!

  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 17,001
    Really digging of the girl lately   I think I finally got it after 18 years   
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • thispureamericanriotthispureamericanriot CaliforniaPosts: 511
    It's a great song. Looks like a great bootleg as well!
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