Your opinion about Immigration.

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  • joseph33joseph33 NashvillePosts: 1,008
    joseph33 said:
    I feel that the people that had to wait and wait to be here legally are being slapped in the face by those who don't think the law applies to them. I feel that there's a very good reason why there should be a vetting process.

    There isn’t really a legal way to come here from Mexico or Central America for most people. employment, family reunification, and humanitarian protection are basically the avenues.  So if I wanted to move to Mexico and those were the only ways I could do it, I wouldn’t qualify.  I don’t already have an employer who’s paying for it and sponsoring me, I have no family there, and I’m not fleeing for my safety.  

     You cannot seek a new life in America.  You have to have that new life lined up first somehow before you come.  Unless you are a high wage skilled worker most employers aren’t sponsoring visas. 

    Migrant worker visas to work on farms are temporary so not immigration 

    Mexican  citizens are not eligible for the green card lottery either.  Countries that qualify for that, yes you wait and wait and sometimes you win the lottery 

    vetting is one thing, sure vet them.  However it should be easier to do it legally.  These people would much rather be here legally so let’s give them a way to do it.  

    Point well made.😁
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 26,171
    joseph33 said:
    I feel that the people that had to wait and wait to be here legally are being slapped in the face by those who don't think the law applies to them. I feel that there's a very good reason why there should be a vetting process.
    imagine your circumstances are so desperate ay home, you take all those risks in the slim hope you can get a favorable hearing for asylum.

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  • Cropduster-80Cropduster-80 Posts: 1,953
    edited July 13
    mickeyrat said:
    joseph33 said:
    I feel that the people that had to wait and wait to be here legally are being slapped in the face by those who don't think the law applies to them. I feel that there's a very good reason why there should be a vetting process.
    imagine your circumstances are so desperate ay home, you take all those risks in the slim hope you can get a favorable hearing for asylum.

    It’s not even just the asylum issue

    My dad is really into genealogy and family history.  So   he’s over the years tracked down the different waves of immigration from our family.  I believe he’s even tracked down some copies of sign in sheets from Ellis island.  Some came before that so there isn’t any records of arrival to be found. 

    Point being to my knowledge none of them applied for anything. They got on a boat and showed up. It was basically like, one guy is the second son from Sweden and his older brother is inheriting the farm, so the younger son bought a boat ticket to NY with no money, no plan, and no prospects when he arrived. Imagine the visa issues today when you have a wife back home, you move to america to get settled and she dies before you can send for her. Her parents send her sister instead when it’s time as a replacement. That happened in my family too 

    I find it ironic that a lot of the descendants of these people don’t see that they aren’t here today as a result of any sort of complicated immigration process anyone went through 
    Post edited by Cropduster-80 on
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 26,171
    mickeyrat said:
    joseph33 said:
    I feel that the people that had to wait and wait to be here legally are being slapped in the face by those who don't think the law applies to them. I feel that there's a very good reason why there should be a vetting process.
    imagine your circumstances are so desperate ay home, you take all those risks in the slim hope you can get a favorable hearing for asylum.

    It’s not even just the asylum issue

    My dad is really into genealogy and family history.  So   he’s over the years tracked down the different waves of immigration from our family.  I believe he’s even tracked down some copies of sign in sheets from Ellis island.  Some came before that so there isn’t any records of arrival to be found. 

    Point being to my knowledge none of them applied for anything. They got on a boat and showed up. It was basically like, one guy is the second son from Sweden and his older brother is inheriting the farm, so the younger son bought a boat ticket to NY with no money, no plan, and no prospects when he arrived. Imagine the visa issues today when you have a wife back home, you move to america to get settled and she dies before you can send for her. Her parents send her sister instead when it’s time as a replacement. That happened in my family too 

    I find it ironic that a lot of the descendants of these people don’t see that they aren’t here today as a result of any sort of complicated immigration process anyone went through 

    yeah. but at that time those rules, regs and laws were not in place.

    mom side is pre-revolution. dads dont know, assume so as well though. farthest been able to go back on his side is some gen of grandfather born in 1822 in Virginia , what is now W Virginia
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    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
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    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 33,332
    mickeyrat said:
    mickeyrat said:
    joseph33 said:
    I feel that the people that had to wait and wait to be here legally are being slapped in the face by those who don't think the law applies to them. I feel that there's a very good reason why there should be a vetting process.
    imagine your circumstances are so desperate ay home, you take all those risks in the slim hope you can get a favorable hearing for asylum.

    It’s not even just the asylum issue

    My dad is really into genealogy and family history.  So   he’s over the years tracked down the different waves of immigration from our family.  I believe he’s even tracked down some copies of sign in sheets from Ellis island.  Some came before that so there isn’t any records of arrival to be found. 

    Point being to my knowledge none of them applied for anything. They got on a boat and showed up. It was basically like, one guy is the second son from Sweden and his older brother is inheriting the farm, so the younger son bought a boat ticket to NY with no money, no plan, and no prospects when he arrived. Imagine the visa issues today when you have a wife back home, you move to america to get settled and she dies before you can send for her. Her parents send her sister instead when it’s time as a replacement. That happened in my family too 

    I find it ironic that a lot of the descendants of these people don’t see that they aren’t here today as a result of any sort of complicated immigration process anyone went through 

    yeah. but at that time those rules, regs and laws were not in place.

    mom side is pre-revolution. dads dont know, assume so as well though. farthest been able to go back on his side is some gen of grandfather born in 1822 in Virginia , what is now W Virginia
    mickeyrat said:
    joseph33 said:
    I feel that the people that had to wait and wait to be here legally are being slapped in the face by those who don't think the law applies to them. I feel that there's a very good reason why there should be a vetting process.
    imagine your circumstances are so desperate ay home, you take all those risks in the slim hope you can get a favorable hearing for asylum.

    It’s not even just the asylum issue

    My dad is really into genealogy and family history.  So   he’s over the years tracked down the different waves of immigration from our family.  I believe he’s even tracked down some copies of sign in sheets from Ellis island.  Some came before that so there isn’t any records of arrival to be found. 

    Point being to my knowledge none of them applied for anything. They got on a boat and showed up. It was basically like, one guy is the second son from Sweden and his older brother is inheriting the farm, so the younger son bought a boat ticket to NY with no money, no plan, and no prospects when he arrived. Imagine the visa issues today when you have a wife back home, you move to america to get settled and she dies before you can send for her. Her parents send her sister instead when it’s time as a replacement. That happened in my family too 

    I find it ironic that a lot of the descendants of these people don’t see that they aren’t here today as a result of any sort of complicated immigration process anyone went through 
    Back then if you didn't work then you wouldn't eat.  There were no policies in place for assistance and the Churches that did had very little to offer.

    The world is much different now then it was back when our ancestors came over.  Hell, you could work at the local grocery and be able to afford a damn house.

    Opening the borders is definitely not the answer.  We have a shortage of affordable housing now.  Where are these people going to live?  
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 26,171

     
    'Tale of two borders': Mexicans not seen at busy crossings
    By ELLIOT SPAGAT
    1 hour ago

    YUMA, Ariz. (AP) — As hundreds of migrants line up along an Arizona border wall around 4 a.m., agents try to separate them into groups by nationality.

    “Anyone from Russia or Bangladesh? I need somebody else from Russia here,” an agent shouts and then says quietly, almost to himself, “These are Romanian.”

    It's a routine task for the Border Patrol in the wee hours in this flat expanse of desert where the wall ends. Migrants from at least 115 countries have been stopped here in the last year, but that may be less striking than what's missing: Mexicans are virtually absent.

    Instead, families from Venezuela, Colombia, Haiti, Cuba, Brazil, India and dozens of other countries arrive in Yuma after wading through the knee-deep Colorado River. Their presence reflects how a pandemic-era rule still shapes the journeys of many migrants, even though much of the U.S. has moved on from COVID-19.

    The changing demographics mark a dramatic shift away from the recent past, when migrants were predominantly from Mexico and Central America's Northern Triangle countries — Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. That's especially clear at some of the busiest crossings, like Yuma and Eagle Pass, Texas, near where several people died in recent days while trying to cross the Rio Grande.

    Mexicans still cross elsewhere but often try to elude capture because they are likely to be expelled under a pandemic rule that denies them a chance to seek asylum.

    Mexicans still account for 7 of every 10 encounters in the Border Patrol's Tucson, Arizona, sector, where smugglers order them to walk at night with black-painted water jugs, camouflage backpacks and boots with carpeted soles to avoid leaving tracks in the sand, said John Modlin, the sector chief.

    “Incredibly different tale of two borders, even though they're within the same state,” Modlin said.

    Migrants who are not from Mexico and the Northern Triangle accounted for 41% of stops on the border from October through July, up from only 12% three years earlier, according to government data.

    In Yuma, they wear sandals and carry shopping bags stuffed with belongings over their shoulders. Some carry toddlers. The migrants typically walk a short distance through tribal lands and surrender to agents, expecting to be released to pursue their immigration cases.

    Meanwhile, Mexicans made up 35% of all border encounters from October through July, higher than three years ago but well below the 85% reported in 2011 and the 95% at the turn of the century.

    In theory, the rule that denies migrants the right to seek asylum on grounds of preventing spread of COVID-19 applies to all nationalities. But in practice, Title 42 is enforced largely for migrants who are accepted by Mexico, which agreed to take in people expelled from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, as well as its own citizens.

    It is difficult for the U.S. to send others to their home countries due to costs, strained diplomatic relations and other considerations.

    “The challenge is what Mexico can accept," Modlin said. "That’s always going to be a limiting factor.”

    In Yuma, Title 42 has become almost nonexistent, with the pandemic rule being applied in only 192 of 24,424 stops in July — less than 1%. In Tucson, it was used in 71% of stops. A court order has kept Title 42 in place indefinitely.

    It is unclear why routes are so divergent. U.S. officials believe inhospitable mountains and canyons near Tucson favor people trying to escape detection, while the ease of crossing in places like Yuma makes those paths better suited for families seeking to surrender.

    “What we know with absolute certainty is that the smuggling organizations control the flow,” Modlin said. "They decide who goes where and when they go to the point. It’s almost like air traffic control of moving people around.”

    In Yuma, groups of up to about two dozen migrants are dropped off by bus or car on a deserted Mexican highway and then begin arriving shortly after midnight at the edge of the imposing wall built during Donald Trump's presidency.

    If English and Spanish fail, agents use Google Translate to question them under generator-powered lights, take photos and load them onto buses.

    Migrants arrive over several hours on different paths, sparking concern among agents that smugglers may be trying to confuse them to sneak some through undetected.

    One recent morning, six Russians said they flew from Istanbul to Tijuana, Mexico, with a stop in Cancun, and hired a driver to take them four hours to the deserted highway where they crossed.

    A 26-year-old man who flew from his home in Peru to Tijuana said the most difficult part of the journey was the anxiety about whether he'd make it to his destination in New Jersey.

    Nelson Munera, 40, said he, his wife and their 17-year-old son got off a bus on the highway and crossed to Yuma because fellow Colombians had taken the same route.

    Lazaro Lopez, who came with his 9-year-old son from Cuba by flying to Nicaragua and crossing Mexico over land, chose Yuma because that's where his smuggler guided him.

    "An opportunity presented itself," said Lopez, 48.

    The Border Patrol drops off hundreds of migrants each day at the Regional Center for Border Health, a clinic near Yuma that charters six buses daily to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. Migrants are released on humanitarian parole or with a notice to appear in immigration court.

    The clinic began the airport shuttles for migrants in February 2021 and recently added buses to Washington, paid for by the state of Arizona.

    “We have seen families from over 140 countries,” said Amanda Aguirre, the health-care provider’s chief executive officer. “We haven’t seen one from Mexico, not through our processing.”

    The shift is also evident on the Mexican side of the border.

    The Don Chon migrant shelter in nearby San Luis Rio Colorado fills many of its roughly 50 beds with Central Americans who were expelled under Title 42.

    Kelvin Zambrano, 33, who arrived in a large group of Hondurans, said he fled threats of extortion and gang violence. Border Patrol agents wouldn't let him share his story, he said.

    “I don't know why, but they don't want Hondurans,” he said.


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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 26,171
    edited October 3
    hmmm. prob not the best person for the job?


     
    Migrant-death suspect ran detention center accused of abuse
    By ACACIA CORONADO
    1 Oct 2022

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — One of two Texas brothers who authorities say opened fire on a group of migrants getting water near the U.S.-Mexico border, killing one and injuring another, was warden at a detention facility with a history of abuse allegations.

    The shooting happened Tuesday in rural Hudspeth County about 90 miles (145 kilometers) from El Paso, according to court documents filed Thursday. One man was killed; a woman was taken to a hospital in El Paso where she was recovering from a gunshot wound in her stomach, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

    DPS said the victims were among a group of migrants standing alongside the road drinking water out of a reservoir when a truck with two men inside pulled over. According to court documents, the group had taken cover as the truck first passed to avoid being detected, but the truck then backed up. The driver then exited the vehicle and fired two shots at the group.

    Witnesses from the group told federal agents that just before hearing the gunshots, they heard one of the two men in the vehicle yell derogatory terms to them and rev the engine, according to court documents.

    Authorities located the truck by checking cameras and finding a vehicle matching the description given by the migrants, according to court records.

    Michael Sheppard and Mark Sheppard, both 60, were charged with manslaughter, according to court documents. Court records did not list attorneys for either man. Contact information for them or for their representatives could not be found and attempts to reach them for comment since their arrest have been unsuccessful.

    Records show that Michael Sheppard was warden at the West Texas Detention Facility, a privately owned center that has housed migrant detainees. A spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement told The Associated Press that no ICE detainees had been held at that detention facility since October 2019, following the opening of a larger detention facility nearby.

    Scott Sutterfield, a spokesman for facility operator Lasalle Corrections, responded to an AP email asking whether Sheppard had been fired as warden. Sutterfield said the warden had been fired “due to an off-duty incident unrelated to his employment.” Sutterfield declined further comment, citing the “ongoing criminal investigation.”

    2018 report by The University of Texas and Texas A&M immigration law clinics and immigration advocacy group RAICES cited multiple allegations of physical and verbal abuse against African migrants at the facility. According to the report, the warden "was involved in three of the detainees’ reports of verbal threats, as well as in incidents of physical assault.” The warden cited in the report was not named.

    However, Texas Congressman Lloyd Doggett, a Democrat, said in a press conference Saturday that Sheppard was in fact the warden at the facility at the time of the allegations and when the report was published. According to information provided by Doggett's office, the webpage for Louisiana-based LaSalle Corrections listed Sheppard as an employee at West Texas since 2015.

    Doggett, along with other Texas Democratic congressmen, called on Saturday for a federal investigation into the shooting.

    “The dehumanizing, the demeaning of people who seek refuge in this country, many of whom are people of color, is what contributed to the violence we see here,” Doggett said.

    In one account detailed in the report, a migrant told the lawyers that the warden hit him in the face while at the nurse’s station and when he turned to the medical officers he was told they "didn’t see anything.”

    “I was then placed in solitary confinement, where I was forced to lie face down on the floor with my hands handcuffed behind my back while I was kicked repeatedly in the ribs by the Warden,” a migrant referred to as Dalmar said in the report.

    The attorneys submitted a civil rights complaint over the allegations that year but according to response letter sent to the lawyers in 2021, the Department of Homeland Security Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties conducted an onsite investigation, made multiple recommendations to ICE, but did not find evidence of “any excessive use of force incidents” or “incidents of wrongful segregation” and found some uses of force to have been appropriate.

    Fatma Marouf, a co-author of the report and director of the Immigrant Rights Clinic at Texas A&M, said it was difficult for authorities to follow up on the allegations because many of the people interviewed for the report were deported shortly after.

    Marouf said current views on immigration enforcement based in deterring people at all costs have “spiraled out of control.”

    "We don't even see people as humans anymore,” Marouf said.

    The number of Venezuelans taken into custody at the U.S.- Mexico soared in August, while fewer migrants from Mexico and some Central American countries were stopped, officials said earlier this month. Overall, U.S. authorities stopped migrants 203,598 times in August, up 1.8% from 199,976 times in July but down 4.7% from 213,593 times in August 2021.

    Silky Shah, executive director of advocacy organization Detention Watch Network, said this is both a problem of the current rhetoric around immigration, including the use of terms like “invasion” by GOP leaders including Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and inaction from federal officials to move away from the previous administration's immigration policies that added to this sentiment.

    “I think there is no question that there is a discourse that is stoking actions like this,” Shah said.

    ____

    Associated Press writers Elliot Spagat and Paul Weber contributed to this report.


    Post edited by mickeyrat on
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    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
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