What book are you reading?

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  • static111static111 Posts: 3,822
    @brianlux I was wondering if you have read any Wendell Berry?  He seems like someone that is very aligned with your close to nature pro environment worldview.  He just came up on my radar, via his essay The Idea Of A Local Economy, and I was hoping you had some reccomendations? 
    Scio me nihil scire

    There are no kings inside the gates of eden
  • goldrushgoldrush everybody knows this is nowherePosts: 6,031
    The 2nd and 3rd books of Mark Lanegan and Wesley Eisold’s poetry trilogy have arrived 



    The first book, Plague Poems, was released in 2020. Year Zero and Ghost Radio were released posthumously in May this year.
    “Do not postpone happiness”
    (Jeff Tweedy, Sydney 2007)

    “Put yer good money on the sunrise”
    (Tim Rogers)
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,924
    static111 said:
    @brianlux I was wondering if you have read any Wendell Berry?  He seems like someone that is very aligned with your close to nature pro environment worldview.  He just came up on my radar, via his essay The Idea Of A Local Economy, and I was hoping you had some reccomendations? 

    Hey static111 , sorry for the late response, just saw this.
    Yes, I have read several books by Berry.  One of my very favorites is a collection of his stories called, The Wild Birds.  But one of my other favorite novels of his that I loved is Nathan Coulter and, in terms of his fiction, that would be a better place to start, partly because it is excellent, and partly because it gives you a good sense of some of the characters in Wild Birds like Uncle Burley. Remembering is also a fine shorter work.
    For Berry's non fiction, I would definitely recommend The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture. It's probably his most widely recognized work and considered a classic in American letters.  That book lit a spark in me when I read it in 1988 that still resonates.  I keep a card file on all books I read and at the top of that card I listed it as "essential."
    The 80's were a transitional time in my life, and ready people like Wendell Berry and Edward Abbey helped me hugely,  Many of those books were like a compass for my life.  I wrote to Mr. Berry and a few weeks later, received at rather lengthy hand typed letter in which he addressed some of my concerns. 
    And the one day in (around) 2004 or so, I was given tickets to see Berry do a reading at the Crest Theater in Sacramento.  After the reading I met him very briefly and told him how grateful I was for his work and his guidance.  He looked at me sheepishly and said, "Thank you, I'm glad I did something right."  I thought, "Oh my God, you are Wendell Berry.  Of course you did!"  But of course I just smiled in embarrassment and said, "Oh yes!  Thank you so much!"
    Also, about 5 years ago I was talking to Ken Sanders, a long time major book seller from Salt Lake City, and Ken told me stories about he and Wendell going fishing and camping together.  At one point he looked right at me and told me quite seriously, "I believe Wendell Berry is the greatest living American writer of today."  I nodded in agreement.
    I hope you find some works of his to be enjoying.  I think you very likely will!

    Oh, I almost forgot to mention his books of poetry.  Collected Poems 1957-1982 is excellent.   And, yes,  that's a fine essay you came across!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • GlowGirlGlowGirl New York, NYPosts: 6,202


  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,924
    Well now, this one is really interesting!
    A few weeks ago, we were watching a Star Trek Next Generation episode called "Darmok" that was base on the ancient classic poem, Epic of Gilgamesh. It occurred to me that in all my years of schooling and reading, I had never read any version of Gilgamesh.  So out in the garage/ bookstore I found a modern translation by Stephen Mitchell's Gilgamesh.  Mitchell has translated some other ancient classics and seems well regarded, so I figured I'd give it a go.  The 67 page introduction got me hooked from the get go- just scholarly enough to be appropriate for an ancient classic, yet at the same time, highly readable and enjoyable.  What a great read this has been- perfect!

    Beside the Star trek connection, there are two other things I found fascinating.  One, that Mitchell, a literary minded writer is married to Byron Katie, a pop-psychology author.  Nothing at all wrong with that- it just surprised me.  I actually did very much like the quote of hers Mitchell included in the introduction: 
    "When I argue with reality, I lose," Byron Katie writes, "- but only 100% of the time." Ha!  Great!
    The other really big surprise to me was finding some passages of Gilgamesh to be so highly erotic.  Holy cow!  Shamhat did WHAT?  Move over, Henry Miller, lol!  I just didn't know ancient classics could be so racy!
    But seriously, this was a terrific read and the long introduction is marvelous.
    Gilgamesh - By Stephen Mitchell paperback  Target


    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 27,495
    brianlux said:
    Well now, this one is really interesting!
    A few weeks ago, we were watching a Star Trek Next Generation episode called "Darmok" that was base on the ancient classic poem, Epic of Gilgamesh. It occurred to me that in all my years of schooling and reading, I had never read any version of Gilgamesh.  So out in the garage/ bookstore I found a modern translation by Stephen Mitchell's Gilgamesh.  Mitchell has translated some other ancient classics and seems well regarded, so I figured I'd give it a go.  The 67 page introduction got me hooked from the get go- just scholarly enough to be appropriate for an ancient classic, yet at the same time, highly readable and enjoyable.  What a great read this has been- perfect!

    Beside the Star trek connection, there are two other things I found fascinating.  One, that Mitchell, a literary minded writer is married to Byron Katie, a pop-psychology author.  Nothing at all wrong with that- it just surprised me.  I actually did very much like the quote of hers Mitchell included in the introduction: 
    "When I argue with reality, I lose," Byron Katie writes, "- but only 100% of the time." Ha!  Great!
    The other really big surprise to me was finding some passages of Gilgamesh to be so highly erotic.  Holy cow!  Shamhat did WHAT?  Move over, Henry Miller, lol!  I just didn't know ancient classics could be so racy!
    But seriously, this was a terrific read and the long introduction is marvelous.
    Gilgamesh - By Stephen Mitchell paperback  Target


    @enkidu
    Interesting work.  Read this in college - keep saying I will repeat read at some point.
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,924
    brianlux said:
    Well now, this one is really interesting!
    A few weeks ago, we were watching a Star Trek Next Generation episode called "Darmok" that was base on the ancient classic poem, Epic of Gilgamesh. It occurred to me that in all my years of schooling and reading, I had never read any version of Gilgamesh.  So out in the garage/ bookstore I found a modern translation by Stephen Mitchell's Gilgamesh.  Mitchell has translated some other ancient classics and seems well regarded, so I figured I'd give it a go.  The 67 page introduction got me hooked from the get go- just scholarly enough to be appropriate for an ancient classic, yet at the same time, highly readable and enjoyable.  What a great read this has been- perfect!

    Beside the Star trek connection, there are two other things I found fascinating.  One, that Mitchell, a literary minded writer is married to Byron Katie, a pop-psychology author.  Nothing at all wrong with that- it just surprised me.  I actually did very much like the quote of hers Mitchell included in the introduction: 
    "When I argue with reality, I lose," Byron Katie writes, "- but only 100% of the time." Ha!  Great!
    The other really big surprise to me was finding some passages of Gilgamesh to be so highly erotic.  Holy cow!  Shamhat did WHAT?  Move over, Henry Miller, lol!  I just didn't know ancient classics could be so racy!
    But seriously, this was a terrific read and the long introduction is marvelous.
    Gilgamesh - By Stephen Mitchell paperback  Target


    @enkidu
    Interesting work.  Read this in college - keep saying I will repeat read at some point.

    I thought about @enkidu  when I read this book.  Have not seen that member here in some time.
    Funny thing is, until I read Gilgamesh, I'd always just figured "Enkidu" was somehow Japanese related, lol.  Man, haha, I need to brush up on those ancient classic more often!

    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • static111static111 Posts: 3,822
    brianlux said:
    static111 said:
    @brianlux I was wondering if you have read any Wendell Berry?  He seems like someone that is very aligned with your close to nature pro environment worldview.  He just came up on my radar, via his essay The Idea Of A Local Economy, and I was hoping you had some reccomendations? 

    Hey static111 , sorry for the late response, just saw this.
    Yes, I have read several books by Berry.  One of my very favorites is a collection of his stories called, The Wild Birds.  But one of my other favorite novels of his that I loved is Nathan Coulter and, in terms of his fiction, that would be a better place to start, partly because it is excellent, and partly because it gives you a good sense of some of the characters in Wild Birds like Uncle Burley. Remembering is also a fine shorter work.
    For Berry's non fiction, I would definitely recommend The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture. It's probably his most widely recognized work and considered a classic in American letters.  That book lit a spark in me when I read it in 1988 that still resonates.  I keep a card file on all books I read and at the top of that card I listed it as "essential."
    The 80's were a transitional time in my life, and ready people like Wendell Berry and Edward Abbey helped me hugely,  Many of those books were like a compass for my life.  I wrote to Mr. Berry and a few weeks later, received at rather lengthy hand typed letter in which he addressed some of my concerns. 
    And the one day in (around) 2004 or so, I was given tickets to see Berry do a reading at the Crest Theater in Sacramento.  After the reading I met him very briefly and told him how grateful I was for his work and his guidance.  He looked at me sheepishly and said, "Thank you, I'm glad I did something right."  I thought, "Oh my God, you are Wendell Berry.  Of course you did!"  But of course I just smiled in embarrassment and said, "Oh yes!  Thank you so much!"
    Also, about 5 years ago I was talking to Ken Sanders, a long time major book seller from Salt Lake City, and Ken told me stories about he and Wendell going fishing and camping together.  At one point he looked right at me and told me quite seriously, "I believe Wendell Berry is the greatest living American writer of today."  I nodded in agreement.
    I hope you find some works of his to be enjoying.  I think you very likely will!

    Oh, I almost forgot to mention his books of poetry.  Collected Poems 1957-1982 is excellent.   And, yes,  that's a fine essay you came across!
    Thanks Brian.  My first purchase of his work is the April 2002 issue of harper's that feature's the essay The Idea of A local Economy.  I could only find a partial of the text online and wanted to check out the whole essay.  I was thinking of starting with The Unsettling of America and going from there.  I will definitely take your recommendations into consideration going forward. Just when I thought I had read all the life changing authors I would come across in my life! So many books so little time.
    Scio me nihil scire

    There are no kings inside the gates of eden
  • Lincoln Lawyer #1
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 12,764


    A fascinating read about a woman raised out in rural Idaho by conspiracy theorist parents who did not provide any education beyond survivalist training and religious indoctrination but who managed to go on to get a PhD after first stepping into a classroom at the university level. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 16,492

    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018. Berlin 2022
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.

    I wish i was the souvenir you kept your house key on..
  • OffSheGoes35OffSheGoes35 Posts: 3,436
    Anybody else have the habit of skipping the Introduction in books?
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 12,764
    23scidoo said:

    That’s a good one. It’s been a while since I read it and I was thinking about it a few weeks ago so maybe time for a re-read. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 16,492
    23scidoo said:

    That’s a good one. It’s been a while since I read it and I was thinking about it a few weeks ago so maybe time for a re-read. 
    Top 20 sci fi books ever!!
    There is also a mini series based on this..
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018. Berlin 2022
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.

    I wish i was the souvenir you kept your house key on..
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 16,492
    Anybody else have the habit of skipping the Introduction in books?
    Only you W!!
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018. Berlin 2022
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.

    I wish i was the souvenir you kept your house key on..
  • JOEJOEJOEJOEJOEJOE Posts: 9,928
    I recently re-read "The Basketball Diaries" by Jim Carroll.

    I first read it when I was the same age as the author when he wrote it, so it has a lot of meaning, though I didn't experience anything similar to him.
  • MalrothMalroth broken down chevroletPosts: 2,366
    Anybody else have the habit of skipping the Introduction in books?

    I usually skim them, wishing I had skipped it.
    The worst of times..they don't phase me,
    even if I look and act really crazy.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 12,764
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:

    That’s a good one. It’s been a while since I read it and I was thinking about it a few weeks ago so maybe time for a re-read. 
    Top 20 sci fi books ever!!
    There is also a mini series based on this..

    Interesting.

    What are your other top 19?
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,924
    edited July 23

    static111 said:
    brianlux said:
    static111 said:
    @brianlux I was wondering if you have read any Wendell Berry?  He seems like someone that is very aligned with your close to nature pro environment worldview.  He just came up on my radar, via his essay The Idea Of A Local Economy, and I was hoping you had some reccomendations? 

    Hey static111 , sorry for the late response, just saw this.
    Yes, I have read several books by Berry.  One of my very favorites is a collection of his stories called, The Wild Birds.  But one of my other favorite novels of his that I loved is Nathan Coulter and, in terms of his fiction, that would be a better place to start, partly because it is excellent, and partly because it gives you a good sense of some of the characters in Wild Birds like Uncle Burley. Remembering is also a fine shorter work.
    For Berry's non fiction, I would definitely recommend The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture. It's probably his most widely recognized work and considered a classic in American letters.  That book lit a spark in me when I read it in 1988 that still resonates.  I keep a card file on all books I read and at the top of that card I listed it as "essential."
    The 80's were a transitional time in my life, and ready people like Wendell Berry and Edward Abbey helped me hugely,  Many of those books were like a compass for my life.  I wrote to Mr. Berry and a few weeks later, received at rather lengthy hand typed letter in which he addressed some of my concerns. 
    And the one day in (around) 2004 or so, I was given tickets to see Berry do a reading at the Crest Theater in Sacramento.  After the reading I met him very briefly and told him how grateful I was for his work and his guidance.  He looked at me sheepishly and said, "Thank you, I'm glad I did something right."  I thought, "Oh my God, you are Wendell Berry.  Of course you did!"  But of course I just smiled in embarrassment and said, "Oh yes!  Thank you so much!"
    Also, about 5 years ago I was talking to Ken Sanders, a long time major book seller from Salt Lake City, and Ken told me stories about he and Wendell going fishing and camping together.  At one point he looked right at me and told me quite seriously, "I believe Wendell Berry is the greatest living American writer of today."  I nodded in agreement.
    I hope you find some works of his to be enjoying.  I think you very likely will!

    Oh, I almost forgot to mention his books of poetry.  Collected Poems 1957-1982 is excellent.   And, yes,  that's a fine essay you came across!
    Thanks Brian.  My first purchase of his work is the April 2002 issue of harper's that feature's the essay The Idea of A local Economy.  I could only find a partial of the text online and wanted to check out the whole essay.  I was thinking of starting with The Unsettling of America and going from there.  I will definitely take your recommendations into consideration going forward. Just when I thought I had read all the life changing authors I would come across in my life! So many books so little time.

    Hey, static111 once again, sorry for the late response.  All to often, my stylus gets stuck on AMT!
    You're very welcome and I'm really happy for you having discovered Wendell Berry.  I know exactly what you mean about how great it is to find a new favorite author.  I'm that way with music too, though I must say, neither happen very frequently these day.  But when they do, oh joy!



    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 16,492
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:

    That’s a good one. It’s been a while since I read it and I was thinking about it a few weeks ago so maybe time for a re-read. 
    Top 20 sci fi books ever!!
    There is also a mini series based on this..

    Interesting.

    What are your other top 19?
    Some of my favourites..
    Valis - Philip Dick
    Neuromancer - William Gibson
    The three body problem - Cixin Liu
    Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
    Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
    Solaris - Stanislaw Rem
    Exhalation - Ted Chiang
    The Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury 
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018. Berlin 2022
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.

    I wish i was the souvenir you kept your house key on..
  • OffSheGoes35OffSheGoes35 Posts: 3,436
    23scidoo said:
    Anybody else have the habit of skipping the Introduction in books?
    Only you W!!
    W, reading the intro is like going to a buffet and loading up at the salad bar, what the hell man? 
  • OffSheGoes35OffSheGoes35 Posts: 3,436
    Malroth said:
    Anybody else have the habit of skipping the Introduction in books?

    I usually skim them, wishing I had skipped it.
    Damn straight.
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 16,492
    23scidoo said:
    Anybody else have the habit of skipping the Introduction in books?
    Only you W!!
    W, reading the intro is like going to a buffet and loading up at the salad bar, what the hell man? 
    What's wrong with the salad??..haha
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018. Berlin 2022
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.

    I wish i was the souvenir you kept your house key on..
  • OffSheGoes35OffSheGoes35 Posts: 3,436
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:
    Anybody else have the habit of skipping the Introduction in books?
    Only you W!!
    W, reading the intro is like going to a buffet and loading up at the salad bar, what the hell man? 
    What's wrong with the salad??..haha
    I forgot my audience in this instance, even Greek salad is delicious. 😁
  • 23scidoo23scidoo Thessaloniki,GreecePosts: 16,492
    23scidoo said:
    23scidoo said:
    Anybody else have the habit of skipping the Introduction in books?
    Only you W!!
    W, reading the intro is like going to a buffet and loading up at the salad bar, what the hell man? 
    What's wrong with the salad??..haha
    I forgot my audience in this instance, even Greek salad is delicious. 😁
     :) 
    Athens 2006. Dusseldorf 2007. Berlin 2009. Venice 2010. Amsterdam 1 2012. Amsterdam 1+2 2014. Buenos Aires 2015.
    Prague Krakow Berlin 2018. Berlin 2022
    EV, Taormina 1+2 2017.

    I wish i was the souvenir you kept your house key on..
  • PapPap Aspra Spitia, GreecePosts: 26,284

    Ooh, yeah! All right!
    Were [Pearl] jammin
    I wanna [Pearl] jam it wid you.
    Were [Pearl] jammin, [Pearl] jammin
    And I hope you like [Pearl] jammin too.

    Sep 30, 2006 - OAKA Sports Hall - Athens, Greece
    Jul 11, 2014 - Milton Keynes Bowl - Milton Keynes, UK
    Jul 08, 2022 - Hyde Park - London, UK
    Jul 09, 2022 - Hyde Park - London, UK
  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 20,826
    edited August 1
    So stoked to finally have these collected in a trade paperback!



    It had been out of print for the longest time, but I think Isaiah’s appearance in The Falcon and the Winter Soldier may have been enough to finally get a reprint. 
    Post edited by dankind on
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 27,495
    It was ok....the ending was better than most of the book.  Cool concept but perhaps a little too slow in developing.

    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,924
    Pap said:


    Heavy but essential reading.  This would be an easy candidate for any high school reading list.  Hard truths about our history that every young adult and up in America would do well to read. 
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • PapPap Aspra Spitia, GreecePosts: 26,284
    edited August 2
    brianlux said:
    Pap said:


    Heavy but essential reading.  This would be an easy candidate for any high school reading list.  Hard truths about our history that every young adult and up in America would do well to read. 
    It's an interesting read so far. Three chapters in, and the main theme is deception.
    Ooh, yeah! All right!
    Were [Pearl] jammin
    I wanna [Pearl] jam it wid you.
    Were [Pearl] jammin, [Pearl] jammin
    And I hope you like [Pearl] jammin too.

    Sep 30, 2006 - OAKA Sports Hall - Athens, Greece
    Jul 11, 2014 - Milton Keynes Bowl - Milton Keynes, UK
    Jul 08, 2022 - Hyde Park - London, UK
    Jul 09, 2022 - Hyde Park - London, UK
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