Alternative paper The Village Voice shuts down after 63 years.

brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,490
This news really gut punched me.  No more Village Voice- not even a digital version.  Gone. 

What an amazing history this paper has.  I'm dumb struck by this.



"Hate your job, love your stuff
If you think that's living, you are
Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
-Juliana Hatfield
***********
M.I.T.S.







Comments

  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 14,350
    It has been a shell of its former self since at least the early aughts. It was sadder to see what it had become than to just have it disappear completely. 
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,490
    dankind said:
    It has been a shell of its former self since at least the early aughts. It was sadder to see what it had become than to just have it disappear completely. 
    It's true, it was better back in the day, but to have it gone for good just somehow represents the loss of something even bigger to me.  Is it that I'm just getting old and not willing to deal with change?  Maybe. 

    Change can be good, of that there is no doubt, and change will always come.  And not all things lost need to be missed.  I don't miss the torture that was dentistry when I was a child, for example.  But I think there is also something to be said about some of the thing lost from generation to generation. 

    I think about  my G.I. generation a lot now that they're both gone and I'm sad that some of the things that were familiar to them are gone, things like being able to leave for the day without locking the house, being able to leave your campsite for a hike without having to stow everything not nailed down.  Real cards and letters in the mail.  And on and on.

    And now the better thing from the baby boomer generation are fading or gone, things that are truly worthy of feeling sorrowful about when seeing them go away. 
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • dankinddankind I am not your foot. Posts: 14,350
    brianlux said:
    dankind said:
    It has been a shell of its former self since at least the early aughts. It was sadder to see what it had become than to just have it disappear completely. 
    It's true, it was better back in the day, but to have it gone for good just somehow represents the loss of something even bigger to me.  Is it that I'm just getting old and not willing to deal with change?  Maybe. 

    Change can be good, of that there is no doubt, and change will always come.  And not all things lost need to be missed.  I don't miss the torture that was dentistry when I was a child, for example.  But I think there is also something to be said about some of the thing lost from generation to generation. 

    I think about  my G.I. generation a lot now that they're both gone and I'm sad that some of the things that were familiar to them are gone, things like being able to leave for the day without locking the house, being able to leave your campsite for a hike without having to stow everything not nailed down.  Real cards and letters in the mail.  And on and on.

    And now the better thing from the baby boomer generation are fading or gone, things that are truly worthy of feeling sorrowful about when seeing them go away. 
    I understand that from a journalist’s perspective. Some of our occupation’s heroes wrote for, our edited for, that bold and brash alternative weekly that indeed was a “voice.”

    The Boston Phoenix spawned one of my heroes, Chuck Pierce (and I still read his work for Esquire), so I was sad to see it go as well. 

    It’s especially sad when it’s a slow demise. 
    I SAW PEARL JAM
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 28,490
    dankind said:
    brianlux said:
    dankind said:
    It has been a shell of its former self since at least the early aughts. It was sadder to see what it had become than to just have it disappear completely. 
    It's true, it was better back in the day, but to have it gone for good just somehow represents the loss of something even bigger to me.  Is it that I'm just getting old and not willing to deal with change?  Maybe. 

    Change can be good, of that there is no doubt, and change will always come.  And not all things lost need to be missed.  I don't miss the torture that was dentistry when I was a child, for example.  But I think there is also something to be said about some of the thing lost from generation to generation. 

    I think about  my G.I. generation a lot now that they're both gone and I'm sad that some of the things that were familiar to them are gone, things like being able to leave for the day without locking the house, being able to leave your campsite for a hike without having to stow everything not nailed down.  Real cards and letters in the mail.  And on and on.

    And now the better thing from the baby boomer generation are fading or gone, things that are truly worthy of feeling sorrowful about when seeing them go away. 
    I understand that from a journalist’s perspective. Some of our occupation’s heroes wrote for, our edited for, that bold and brash alternative weekly that indeed was a “voice.”

    The Boston Phoenix spawned one of my heroes, Chuck Pierce (and I still read his work for Esquire), so I was sad to see it go as well. 

    It’s especially sad when it’s a slow demise. 
    What does that leave us?  Rolling Stone lost it's appeal for me ages ago when it went glossy. Creem had some great stuff but they are long gone.  The Berkeley Barb was cool... 800 years ago.  What's left?
    "Hate your job, love your stuff
    If you think that's living, you are
    Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong"
    -Juliana Hatfield
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.







  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,261
    Wonder why they didn't at least try to offer paid version?
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