U.S. National Parks thread

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  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 23,692
    PJ_Soul said:
    If anyone hasn't, watch Ken Burns' documentary series about America's National Parks. It is so good, and really brings home just how much history and work and energy and caring is currently being destroyed by the Trump administration.
    What are the top 3 Canadian National Parks in your opinion?  Banff, Jasper and waterton?
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 48,080
    edited July 2018
    mcgruff10 said:
    PJ_Soul said:
    If anyone hasn't, watch Ken Burns' documentary series about America's National Parks. It is so good, and really brings home just how much history and work and energy and caring is currently being destroyed by the Trump administration.
    What are the top 3 Canadian National Parks in your opinion?  Banff, Jasper and waterton?
    Pacific Rim National Park, Banff, and perhaps Fundy? Although I haven't been to Fundy. It just looks really awesome to me in photos and by word of mouth. Yes, Jasper is also great, although if you've been to Banff NP, there isn't much new to see when you go North to Jasper. However, that south to north drive from Banff to Jasper happens to be one of the most gorgeous drives on the face of the planet. If you ever plan to do it, rent a convertible!
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 24,563
    rgambs said:
    rgambs said:
    ^^Sounds like a great time. I think the weather is supposed to be good. Got some friends that are from Manistee who say that area is really nice.
    Then again, I am in Northwest Indiana, soooo...not much to see here. But we do have Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore/Indiana Dunes State Park. That's a really good area for hiking and swimming.
    I haven't been in any dune ecosystems yet so this is a new experience for us.  Also the first backpack trip since we had our son who is 3 now.

    It's hard to have a vacation and not go to the mountains lol 
    I would rather a beach than mountains all day long!

    rgambs said:
    ^^Sounds like a great time. I think the weather is supposed to be good. Got some friends that are from Manistee who say that area is really nice.
    Then again, I am in Northwest Indiana, soooo...not much to see here. But we do have Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore/Indiana Dunes State Park. That's a really good area for hiking and swimming.
    I haven't been in any dune ecosystems yet so this is a new experience for us.  Also the first backpack trip since we had our son who is 3 now.

    It's hard to have a vacation and not go to the mountains lol 
    I would rather a beach than mountains all day long!
    There are two kinds of people, mountain people and beach people.
    The second group is wrong.
    lol, I like the mountains too but I grew up on a beach so you wouldn't understand.

    I do love the mountains in Cali and AZ.  I've been all over them!

    Virginia and PA have "hills" to me.

    Alaska has nice mountains too.

    But I love me a beach.
  • darwinstheorydarwinstheory LaPorte, INPosts: 4,149
    rgambs said:
    ^^Sounds like a great time. I think the weather is supposed to be good. Got some friends that are from Manistee who say that area is really nice.
    Then again, I am in Northwest Indiana, soooo...not much to see here. But we do have Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore/Indiana Dunes State Park. That's a really good area for hiking and swimming.
    I haven't been in any dune ecosystems yet so this is a new experience for us.  Also the first backpack trip since we had our son who is 3 now.

    It's hard to have a vacation and not go to the mountains lol 
    I would rather a beach than mountains all day long!
    No way! Give me the mountains! So humbling and rewarding to hike and drive through!

    *I may have a different tone if I weren't so pale, over weight and if I didn't have a girlfriend. Lmao
    Give me a fishing pole any time of year and I'm still in the ocean...  I'm fishing for Stripers in November in the water.  My friends think I'm nuts...
    Correction: we ALL think you're nuts! LMAO!
    "A smart monkey doesn't monkey around with another monkey's monkey" - Darwin's Theory
  • darwinstheorydarwinstheory LaPorte, INPosts: 4,149
    PJ Soul - that is an awesome view
    "A smart monkey doesn't monkey around with another monkey's monkey" - Darwin's Theory
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 13,199
    PJ_Soul said:
    rgambs said:
    rgambs said:
    ^^Sounds like a great time. I think the weather is supposed to be good. Got some friends that are from Manistee who say that area is really nice.
    Then again, I am in Northwest Indiana, soooo...not much to see here. But we do have Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore/Indiana Dunes State Park. That's a really good area for hiking and swimming.
    I haven't been in any dune ecosystems yet so this is a new experience for us.  Also the first backpack trip since we had our son who is 3 now.

    It's hard to have a vacation and not go to the mountains lol 
    I would rather a beach than mountains all day long!

    rgambs said:
    ^^Sounds like a great time. I think the weather is supposed to be good. Got some friends that are from Manistee who say that area is really nice.
    Then again, I am in Northwest Indiana, soooo...not much to see here. But we do have Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore/Indiana Dunes State Park. That's a really good area for hiking and swimming.
    I haven't been in any dune ecosystems yet so this is a new experience for us.  Also the first backpack trip since we had our son who is 3 now.

    It's hard to have a vacation and not go to the mountains lol 
    I would rather a beach than mountains all day long!
    There are two kinds of people, mountain people and beach people.
    The second group is wrong.
    There is a 3rd: Mountain and beach people. That's why we are in VanCity. ;) I sincerely can't imagine not living with both at the same time long term. I did live in the Rockies for just a handful of months once... It was so beautiful... but the Rockies need to be sitting in an ocean. Then they'd be perfect. ;)

    I don't think I've ever been to an American national park...? Or have I? Is the very northwest side of Washington State part of a national park? Where all those insanely beautiful beaches are, on the edge of forests? I thought it was actually First Nations land, so probably not? But the best National Park I've been to might be Banff National Park, especially since it includes the Columbia Glacier, which was awesome to walk up (and under!). Or maybe it's the Pacific Rim National Park on the west side of Vancouver Island .... that is certainly as beautiful as it gets!






    Those who live where the mountains meet the sea are a special breed of lucky!  Can't wait make it to Alaska.
    I do feel though that having them together subtracts a little from each...so instead of one 9/10 you get two 8/10's together and have to live with a meager 16/10.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,634
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 31,975
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    This!  Muir Woods comes to mind.  After visiting my step daughter in San Francisco yesterday, we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge and just a little ways into Marin County saw a lighted sign that said "Muir Woods Full, No reservations.  Try again."  That's horrible!  I remember a time when you could go there any time.  There were never reservations needed.  It's not even an over-night spot- just a day use national Monument.  WTF?!  What it comes down to is too few natural and wild places and way to many human beings. 

    And yes, t'n'g, Trump admin is trying to close some of them down. He wants to shut down 26 National Parks.  That alone should qualify for impeachment.


    Sorry to get political and on a rant here (it's a fine thread), but I do feel an urgent need to defend our National Parks and even create more park lands and wilderness. 



    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 24,563
    brianlux said:
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    This!  Muir Woods comes to mind.  After visiting my step daughter in San Francisco yesterday, we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge and just a little ways into Marin County saw a lighted sign that said "Muir Woods Full, No reservations.  Try again."  That's horrible!  I remember a time when you could go there any time.  There were never reservations needed.  It's not even an over-night spot- just a day use national Monument.  WTF?!  What it comes down to is too few natural and wild places and way to many human beings. 

    And yes, t'n'g, Trump admin is trying to close some of them down. He wants to shut down 26 National Parks.  That alone should qualify for impeachment.


    Sorry to get political and on a rant here (it's a fine thread), but I do feel an urgent need to defend our National Parks and even create more park lands and wilderness. 



    He wants national monuments acreage decreased mostly, not shut down.  There is a difference but it is still egregious.

    As for Muir, STAY AWAY.  While planning my Cali tour that was a place I wanted to go to along with glass beach and then the redwoods.  It would have been a coast tour.

    Everything I read said to not bother anymore.  If you are an outdoors-man then avoid it.  Which is a shame...

    We did Sequoia instead.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,634
    brianlux said:
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    This!  Muir Woods comes to mind.  After visiting my step daughter in San Francisco yesterday, we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge and just a little ways into Marin County saw a lighted sign that said "Muir Woods Full, No reservations.  Try again."  That's horrible!  I remember a time when you could go there any time.  There were never reservations needed.  It's not even an over-night spot- just a day use national Monument.  WTF?!  What it comes down to is too few natural and wild places and way to many human beings. 

    And yes, t'n'g, Trump admin is trying to close some of them down. He wants to shut down 26 National Parks.  That alone should qualify for impeachment.


    Sorry to get political and on a rant here (it's a fine thread), but I do feel an urgent need to defend our National Parks and even create more park lands and wilderness. 



    What happens if he removes the federal protection?  Does the monuments get turned over to the state?
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 13,199
    brianlux said:
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    This!  Muir Woods comes to mind.  After visiting my step daughter in San Francisco yesterday, we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge and just a little ways into Marin County saw a lighted sign that said "Muir Woods Full, No reservations.  Try again."  That's horrible!  I remember a time when you could go there any time.  There were never reservations needed.  It's not even an over-night spot- just a day use national Monument.  WTF?!  What it comes down to is too few natural and wild places and way to many human beings. 

    And yes, t'n'g, Trump admin is trying to close some of them down. He wants to shut down 26 National Parks.  That alone should qualify for impeachment.


    Sorry to get political and on a rant here (it's a fine thread), but I do feel an urgent need to defend our National Parks and even create more park lands and wilderness. 



    What happens if he removes the federal protection?  Does the monuments get turned over to the state?
    Mostly, yes, and then the state invariably opens the land for natural resource extraction and other troublesome industry.

    People love to champion smaller government and turn more power over to local and community leaders, and that sounds great in theory, all the arguments make sense.  Unfortunately, in reality, it just ends up that state and local government is much much cheaper to buy and corrupt.  That's why federal control is a necessity for long term investments like education and the environment, small governments favor short term investments (a few coal jobs now vs millions lost in the myriad costs of pollution) nearly every single time.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,634
    rgambs said:
    brianlux said:
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    This!  Muir Woods comes to mind.  After visiting my step daughter in San Francisco yesterday, we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge and just a little ways into Marin County saw a lighted sign that said "Muir Woods Full, No reservations.  Try again."  That's horrible!  I remember a time when you could go there any time.  There were never reservations needed.  It's not even an over-night spot- just a day use national Monument.  WTF?!  What it comes down to is too few natural and wild places and way to many human beings. 

    And yes, t'n'g, Trump admin is trying to close some of them down. He wants to shut down 26 National Parks.  That alone should qualify for impeachment.


    Sorry to get political and on a rant here (it's a fine thread), but I do feel an urgent need to defend our National Parks and even create more park lands and wilderness. 



    What happens if he removes the federal protection?  Does the monuments get turned over to the state?
    Mostly, yes, and then the state invariably opens the land for natural resource extraction and other troublesome industry.

    People love to champion smaller government and turn more power over to local and community leaders, and that sounds great in theory, all the arguments make sense.  Unfortunately, in reality, it just ends up that state and local government is much much cheaper to buy and corrupt.  That's why federal control is a necessity for long term investments like education and the environment, small governments favor short term investments (a few coal jobs now vs millions lost in the myriad costs of pollution) nearly every single time.
    That sucks ... can a future president introduce legislation that would require congress approval in the future.  It seems these loopholes need to be closed.  I'm beginning to think executive order is a bad thing...
  • HorosHoros Posts: 4,517
    Crater Lake a couple of weeks ago was over the top crowded. Took a good 20-30 minutes waiting traffic to get in. Resorted to parking off road in a picnic area. Lines in the gift shop and at the concessions. People everywhere. 
    #FHP
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 13,199
    Horos said:
    Crater Lake a couple of weeks ago was over the top crowded. Took a good 20-30 minutes waiting traffic to get in. Resorted to parking off road in a picnic area. Lines in the gift shop and at the concessions. People everywhere. 
    Bummer!  It is peak season though, should we really expect solitude at such glorious places in peak season?  
    Overcrowding in natural spaces is a tough one for me.
    I love to see Joe and Sally Fatass get out and do something, and I really hope that park visits stick with the kids, but I don't want to share my experience with them.
    The key for enjoyment is to go to the hot spots out of season and use peak season to explore the truly empty places.  The key for preservation is a fine line between inspiring the masses to appreciation and controlling the impact that comes with it, and it's a hard line to walk.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 31,975
    Horos said:
    Crater Lake a couple of weeks ago was over the top crowded. Took a good 20-30 minutes waiting traffic to get in. Resorted to parking off road in a picnic area. Lines in the gift shop and at the concessions. People everywhere. 
    Yeah, I remember it being pretty busy up there this time of year. 

    Anymore, I try to plan trips to National Parks as close to the end or beginning of the season as possible and figure more inclement weather is easier to deal with than big crowds of people.
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • jerparker20jerparker20 St. Paul, MNPosts: 1,925
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    Not totally true.  If your sole purpose of visiting a National Park is to avoid people, then you should avoid National Parks. They attract people, even the remote ones.  I visited Isle Royale this past June which is a remote park and one of the least visited.  I still encountered people.  It comes down to timing visits and activities to reduce the people aspect.  Couple things I've found to minimize crowds and still enjoy myself and the wonders of nature:

    1.  If possible visit parks during off-peak times of the year like the spring or fall instead of the summer.  Also visit during the week and not weekends.
    2. Start activities like hikes early in the morning (6AM).  I've found the average park visitor doesn't get moving until well after 9am.
    3. Go on hiking trails/loops that are over 3 miles in length.  The average park visitor is not going to spend several hours completing those hikes, and if they do they usually turn around by the 1 mile point.
  • HorosHoros Posts: 4,517
    rgambs said:
    Horos said:
    Crater Lake a couple of weeks ago was over the top crowded. Took a good 20-30 minutes waiting traffic to get in. Resorted to parking off road in a picnic area. Lines in the gift shop and at the concessions. People everywhere. 
    Bummer!  It is peak season though, should we really expect solitude at such glorious places in peak season?  
    Overcrowding in natural spaces is a tough one for me.
    I love to see Joe and Sally Fatass get out and do something, and I really hope that park visits stick with the kids, but I don't want to share my experience with them.
    The key for enjoyment is to go to the hot spots out of season and use peak season to explore the truly empty places.  The key for preservation is a fine line between inspiring the masses to appreciation and controlling the impact that comes with it, and it's a hard line to walk.
    I expected it. We were just in the neighborhood so we drove through. Actually my daughters BF(native Oregonian) had never been there.
    #FHP
  • HorosHoros Posts: 4,517

    brianlux said:
    Horos said:
    Crater Lake a couple of weeks ago was over the top crowded. Took a good 20-30 minutes waiting traffic to get in. Resorted to parking off road in a picnic area. Lines in the gift shop and at the concessions. People everywhere. 
    Yeah, I remember it being pretty busy up there this time of year. 

    Anymore, I try to plan trips to National Parks as close to the end or beginning of the season as possible and figure more inclement weather is easier to deal with than big crowds of people.
    I've gone in the dead of winter. Only the south entrance is open. It's beautiful. Of course it always is. I've taken the boat tour on the surface aslo.
    #FHP
  • darwinstheorydarwinstheory LaPorte, INPosts: 4,149
    rgambs said:

    Bummer!  It is peak season though, should we really expect solitude at such glorious places in peak season?  
    Overcrowding in natural spaces is a tough one for me.
    I love to see Joe and Sally Fatass get out and do something, and I really hope that park visits stick with the kids, but I don't want to share my experience with them.
    The key for enjoyment is to go to the hot spots out of season and use peak season to explore the truly empty places.  The key for preservation is a fine line between inspiring the masses to appreciation and controlling the impact that comes with it, and it's a hard line to walk.
    Hey! I'm Joe Fatass, thank you very much. 
    "A smart monkey doesn't monkey around with another monkey's monkey" - Darwin's Theory
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 48,080
    brianlux said:
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    This!  Muir Woods comes to mind.  After visiting my step daughter in San Francisco yesterday, we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge and just a little ways into Marin County saw a lighted sign that said "Muir Woods Full, No reservations.  Try again."  That's horrible!  I remember a time when you could go there any time.  There were never reservations needed.  It's not even an over-night spot- just a day use national Monument.  WTF?!  What it comes down to is too few natural and wild places and way to many human beings. 

    And yes, t'n'g, Trump admin is trying to close some of them down. He wants to shut down 26 National Parks.  That alone should qualify for impeachment.


    Sorry to get political and on a rant here (it's a fine thread), but I do feel an urgent need to defend our National Parks and even create more park lands and wilderness. 



    Is there any such thing in America as a government campsite that isn't always fully booked? Or private for that matter? I have heard so many stories about how you have to book any camping months or even years in advance in the US now.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 13,199
    rgambs said:

    Bummer!  It is peak season though, should we really expect solitude at such glorious places in peak season?  
    Overcrowding in natural spaces is a tough one for me.
    I love to see Joe and Sally Fatass get out and do something, and I really hope that park visits stick with the kids, but I don't want to share my experience with them.
    The key for enjoyment is to go to the hot spots out of season and use peak season to explore the truly empty places.  The key for preservation is a fine line between inspiring the masses to appreciation and controlling the impact that comes with it, and it's a hard line to walk.
    Hey! I'm Joe Fatass, thank you very much. 
    Hahaha it's meant as more of a knock on a person's life and outlook on life than a knock on their actual BMI.  My best friend is technically obese and definitely somewhat fat, but he is an adventure badass.
    Joe Fatass is a generic name I use for people who only go to drive-up scenery and always have their Big Gulp in one hand and phone in the other.  They complain about the sun being too bright and the temperature not being perfect, they buy expensive junk trinkets at the gift shop and they have no relevant information to the area they are visiting, you'll often hear them asking the dumbest possible questions as they walk past information kiosks.

    Are you still Joe Fatass?
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 31,975
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    Not totally true.  If your sole purpose of visiting a National Park is to avoid people, then you should avoid National Parks. They attract people, even the remote ones.  I visited Isle Royale this past June which is a remote park and one of the least visited.  I still encountered people.  It comes down to timing visits and activities to reduce the people aspect.  Couple things I've found to minimize crowds and still enjoy myself and the wonders of nature:

    1.  If possible visit parks during off-peak times of the year like the spring or fall instead of the summer.  Also visit during the week and not weekends.
    2. Start activities like hikes early in the morning (6AM).  I've found the average park visitor doesn't get moving until well after 9am.
    3. Go on hiking trails/loops that are over 3 miles in length.  The average park visitor is not going to spend several hours completing those hikes, and if they do they usually turn around by the 1 mile point.
    All excellent advice, Jer!

    PJ_Soul said:
    brianlux said:
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    This!  Muir Woods comes to mind.  After visiting my step daughter in San Francisco yesterday, we crossed the Golden Gate Bridge and just a little ways into Marin County saw a lighted sign that said "Muir Woods Full, No reservations.  Try again."  That's horrible!  I remember a time when you could go there any time.  There were never reservations needed.  It's not even an over-night spot- just a day use national Monument.  WTF?!  What it comes down to is too few natural and wild places and way to many human beings. 

    And yes, t'n'g, Trump admin is trying to close some of them down. He wants to shut down 26 National Parks.  That alone should qualify for impeachment.


    Sorry to get political and on a rant here (it's a fine thread), but I do feel an urgent need to defend our National Parks and even create more park lands and wilderness. 



    Is there any such thing in America as a government campsite that isn't always fully booked? Or private for that matter? I have heard so many stories about how you have to book any camping months or even years in advance in the US now.
    Most, if not all, National Park camping is booked well ahead of time.  The federally funded campsites that are not always booked are the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) campgrounds.  Many of them are first come first serve.  But I have to tell you, I've pulled into some USFS campgrounds that had some campers that looked very scary and/or unfriendly.  Some of them are occupied my either transient workers or the semi-homeless people who are not interested in having your every-day campers around. 

    California state parks are becoming more an more booked up ahead of time.  That sure has changed.  Salt Point on the Sonoma Coast used to always have open sites and now even the overflow area is often crowded.  That surprising considering the state camping fees there are now $35 US per night.

    If we take the nieces or nephews, we go to established sites.  But if it's just the two of us, we've gotten pretty turned off to the whole crowded, noisy campground scene and whenever possible do what is called "dry camping" in state and U.S. forest lands where permitted (which is mostly here in the west).  During wet times of the year we get a fire permit from the USFS so we can build campfires.  Dry camping or backpacking are really the only ways to get away from the noise and clutter. 
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 48,080
    edited July 2018
    Yeah, forest service or hydro campsites up here can have some pretty gnarly guests too, lol. Although I have still always favoured them in BC... I don't know what such places are like generally, but I've managed to find a few that are in absolutely spectacular settings, and well worth tolerating a few yahoos once in a while (I will admit that story I've told before about that one time I ran into a guy who was actually packing heat in Canada is a story from one of those campsites, lol). Obviously these places have the great benefit of not being packed with fucking kids. That is a BIG positive feature for me. Most parents want amenities when they camp with children, so aren't humping it up to a remote hydro campsite that only has an outhouse and maybe a water pump if we're lucky.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 31,975
    PJ_Soul said:
    Yeah, forest service or hydro campsites up here can have some pretty gnarly guests too, lol. Although I have still always favoured them in BC... I don't know what such places are like generally, but I've managed to find a few that are in absolutely spectacular settings, and well worth tolerating a few yahoos once in a while (I will admit that story I've told before about that one time I ran into a guy who was actually packing heat in Canada is a story from one of those campsites, lol). Obviously these places have the great benefit of not being packed with fucking kids. That is a BIG positive feature for me. Most parents want amenities when they camp with children, so aren't humping it up to a remote hydro campsite that only has an outhouse and maybe a water pump if we're lucky.
    Doug Peacock (who wrote the better know book, Grizzly Years) tells a very harrowing story in his excellent book, Walking it Off called "Black Beach" about a time he and his family were camping in a primitive campground in a remote part of area of Vancouver Island.  These drunk loggers came around who seemed very aggressive and things got really weird!  They got through it OK but that story is a very unsettling read! 

    I think the most wildland camping I've ever done was at this place called KOA at the edge of Missoula, Montana.  You might know the place.  I believe that was in the fall of 2012.  Lots of wild but animals prowling around the place.  Turns out they were quite friendly and harmless and, in fact, if I recall correctly, some of these critters were even passed out.  The game wardens were a bit fearful that night because they had heard a rumor about how these animals were going to go on a "Rave".  Other than some baying in the night, it all turned out fairly peaceful and, actually, it was all quite good fun!
    “In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result.”
    -James Allen










  • darwinstheorydarwinstheory LaPorte, INPosts: 4,149
    Hmmm...well, I don't buy expensive trinkets but I may buy a keychain. I don't like overly hot weather but I'll usually try to hit the trails before it gets to be too hot. [Even in high school when I was graduating at literally 150, I would sit in the classroom and sweat through 2 t-shirts in the arm pits (always wore 2 to delay the obvious wet marks). I am 220 now at 35 and was 190 about 5 years ago when my job was much more physical and I used to smoke.]

    I don't get Big Gulps, but I do indulge in energy drinks. Nowadays I go with "Bang" and "Kickstart" brands instead of the overloaded sugar and calorie types that I used to drink. 

    When we go to parks, we definitely walk trails more than I would guess 90% of the rest of the folks would. Pulled into Yellowstone on a Sunday and left on a Thursday morning. Lost 7 pounds on that vaca.

    I would say that based on your interpretation of Joe Fatass, no I am not that. 
    "A smart monkey doesn't monkey around with another monkey's monkey" - Darwin's Theory
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 20,558
    I would give you a pass...but label you a Note Dame Fatass.
    :)
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • xavier mcdanielxavier mcdaniel Somewhere in NYCPosts: 8,420
    This thread is designed to share some of our likes/dislikes/stories about some of America's National Parks. If you're like me, and have been to some, you may have had a fantastic time. I always enjoy telling my stories or showing my pictures, but they very seldom do the actual scenery much justice. I really need to get a camera for such trips. But it's hard to justify so much money for a decent camera.

    Below is a questionnaire. If you would like to participate, have at it. Look forward to hearing of others experiences.

    Have you visited any:
    How many?
    Which ones?
    Rank favorite to least favorite?
    Key points (from each park)?
    What time of year did you visit?
    Was it worth the trip?
    Do you plan on visiting all National Parks?
    Do you plan on visiting any more?
    If so, which ones?
    Which one is next?
    Any must share stories?


    Ready? GO!
    I've visited Yosemite and Mt. Rainier.

    I went to Yosemite on August 24, 2006 with my parents. We were staying in San Francisco and took one of those side trips that leaves around 5:30 am. From what I recall it's a five-hour trip, though we stopped somewhere along the way. I want to say Merced. We saw all the major things El Capitan among them,

    I went to Mt. Rainier with three other people I met from the board who don't post here anymore. This was Sept. 20, 2009 when I was in Seattle to see two shows at Key Arena. Capped one of the best weekends I've had started it with Mariners-Yankees, Ichiro walk off against Rivera, Washington beating USC on a last-second field goal. USC was ranked No. 2 at the time I believe and then the listening party for backspacer at Easy Street Records. From what I recall the section of Rainier we went to (Paradise) is about two hours beyond Seattle.
    Reading 2004
    Albany 2006 Camden 2006 E. Rutherford 2, 2006 Inglewood 2006,
    Chicago 2007
    Camden 2008 MSG 2008 MSG 2008 Hartford 2008.
    Seattle 2009 Seattle 2009 Philadelphia 2009,Philadelphia 2009 Philadelphia 2009
    Hartford 2010 MSG 2010 MSG 2010
    Toronto 2011,Toronto 2011
    Wrigley Field 2013 Brooklyn 2013 Brooklyn 2013 Philadelphia 2, 2013
    Philadelphia 1, 2016 Philadelphia 2 2016 New York 2016 New York 2016 Fenway 1, 2016

    "I play good, hard-nosed basketball.
    Things happen in the game. Nothing you
    can do. I don't go and say,
    "I'm gonna beat this guy up."
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 20,558
    That hurts
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,634
    The best National Parks are the most remote ... way less people.
    Not totally true.  If your sole purpose of visiting a National Park is to avoid people, then you should avoid National Parks. They attract people, even the remote ones.  I visited Isle Royale this past June which is a remote park and one of the least visited.  I still encountered people.  It comes down to timing visits and activities to reduce the people aspect.  Couple things I've found to minimize crowds and still enjoy myself and the wonders of nature:

    1.  If possible visit parks during off-peak times of the year like the spring or fall instead of the summer.  Also visit during the week and not weekends.
    2. Start activities like hikes early in the morning (6AM).  I've found the average park visitor doesn't get moving until well after 9am.
    3. Go on hiking trails/loops that are over 3 miles in length.  The average park visitor is not going to spend several hours completing those hikes, and if they do they usually turn around by the 1 mile point.
    The last 2 years I have went to Jasper National Park in Alberta Canada and it is never overly busy ... this is the remote I'm talking about.  Most tourist stay in the Banff area...
  • darwinstheorydarwinstheory LaPorte, INPosts: 4,149
    I would give you a pass...but label you a Note Dame Fatass.
    :)

    Well played, fucker! And welcome to the National Parks thread. Go Irish! 
    "A smart monkey doesn't monkey around with another monkey's monkey" - Darwin's Theory
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