Anyone want to shape up in 2018? A continuing journey.......

1636466686974

Comments

  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,525
    Breakfast can be a part of dieting for body composition but it really isn't necessary and is more likely to hurt than help.
    Most of the information spread by health experts through the 80's and 90's is completely unrelated to actual research.  The biggest, most pervasive, and ridiculous myth that health experts have perpetuated is the "starvation mode myth".
    It's total BS.  It makes some sense logically, but it isn't based on physiology and it isn't true.
    Entire swaths of the internet are a wasteland of fat people telling other fat people they need to eat more to lose weight!  There are seriously people out there that will swear the less they eat the more weight they gain.  How in the hell is that possible?  It isn't.  Simple physics blows that apart.  Your metabolic rate does slow when you deprive your body of calories.  Adaptive thermogenesis is a real and documented effect of starvation, but it requires actual starvation and isn't engaged simply because you are 1200 calories for the day.
    Your metabolic rate is effected by quite a few factors, but almost never to the degree that people believe.  We are talking about rate changes that equate to tens of calories in most cases, less than a full size candy bar in nearly all cases.
    Long story short, when you deprive your body of calories, your body eats itself.  Period.

    Quite a few studies have shown that people who eat breakfast tend to have more body fat than those that don't, the assumption is that it is due to a simple increase in caloric intake.  Most people who have even minor food addiction issues (aka, you enjoy junk food) will eat the same size lunch regardless of breakfast intake.
    Intermittent fasting and the research behind it has blown the importance of breakfast right off the map.
    I could link some studies and abstracts sometime, it's a fascinating subject that we are just beginning to really understand.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • FoxyRedLaFoxyRedLa Lauren / MIPosts: 4,773
    Your body eats itself :rofl: and EW! What I'm doing is working. I changed up my diet and my body is running beautifully! Sleep better. Eat better. And losing weight. I have finally crossed the 30 lb down mark! 

    I'm not hurting myself by not eating breakfast. I actually take a wheatgrass shot in the morning if that makes you feel better :lol:. My hormones get more time to work and regulate and repair my body when I fast. 

    I'm feeling good and intend on keepin on keepin on!

    Just cuz I skip breakfast doesn't mean I don't hook my body up at lunch and dinner with what it needs.

    Not saying anyone implied anything just sayin.

    Morning all!
    Oh please let it rain today.
    Those that can be trusted can change their mind.
  • Miss.SnowdropMiss.Snowdrop ScotlandPosts: 164
    rgambs said:
    Breakfast can be a part of dieting for body composition but it really isn't necessary and is more likely to hurt than help.
    Most of the information spread by health experts through the 80's and 90's is completely unrelated to actual research.  The biggest, most pervasive, and ridiculous myth that health experts have perpetuated is the "starvation mode myth".
    It's total BS.  It makes some sense logically, but it isn't based on physiology and it isn't true.
    Entire swaths of the internet are a wasteland of fat people telling other fat people they need to eat more to lose weight!  There are seriously people out there that will swear the less they eat the more weight they gain.  How in the hell is that possible?  It isn't.  Simple physics blows that apart.  Your metabolic rate does slow when you deprive your body of calories.  Adaptive thermogenesis is a real and documented effect of starvation, but it requires actual starvation and isn't engaged simply because you are 1200 calories for the day.
    Your metabolic rate is effected by quite a few factors, but almost never to the degree that people believe.  We are talking about rate changes that equate to tens of calories in most cases, less than a full size candy bar in nearly all cases.
    Long story short, when you deprive your body of calories, your body eats itself.  Period.

    Quite a few studies have shown that people who eat breakfast tend to have more body fat than those that don't, the assumption is that it is due to a simple increase in caloric intake.  Most people who have even minor food addiction issues (aka, you enjoy junk food) will eat the same size lunch regardless of breakfast intake.
    Intermittent fasting and the research behind it has blown the importance of breakfast right off the map.
    I could link some studies and abstracts sometime, it's a fascinating subject that we are just beginning to really understand.
    I would love to read more about this. I am not sure I would be able to understand a study (English is not my first language and I am not a very scientific person) but, if you know of any articles based on the science, that'd be great. Because I force myself to eat breakfast in the first hour after getting up before I do anything else everyday
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,525
    rgambs said:
    Breakfast can be a part of dieting for body composition but it really isn't necessary and is more likely to hurt than help.
    Most of the information spread by health experts through the 80's and 90's is completely unrelated to actual research.  The biggest, most pervasive, and ridiculous myth that health experts have perpetuated is the "starvation mode myth".
    It's total BS.  It makes some sense logically, but it isn't based on physiology and it isn't true.
    Entire swaths of the internet are a wasteland of fat people telling other fat people they need to eat more to lose weight!  There are seriously people out there that will swear the less they eat the more weight they gain.  How in the hell is that possible?  It isn't.  Simple physics blows that apart.  Your metabolic rate does slow when you deprive your body of calories.  Adaptive thermogenesis is a real and documented effect of starvation, but it requires actual starvation and isn't engaged simply because you are 1200 calories for the day.
    Your metabolic rate is effected by quite a few factors, but almost never to the degree that people believe.  We are talking about rate changes that equate to tens of calories in most cases, less than a full size candy bar in nearly all cases.
    Long story short, when you deprive your body of calories, your body eats itself.  Period.

    Quite a few studies have shown that people who eat breakfast tend to have more body fat than those that don't, the assumption is that it is due to a simple increase in caloric intake.  Most people who have even minor food addiction issues (aka, you enjoy junk food) will eat the same size lunch regardless of breakfast intake.
    Intermittent fasting and the research behind it has blown the importance of breakfast right off the map.
    I could link some studies and abstracts sometime, it's a fascinating subject that we are just beginning to really understand.
    I would love to read more about this. I am not sure I would be able to understand a study (English is not my first language and I am not a very scientific person) but, if you know of any articles based on the science, that'd be great. Because I force myself to eat breakfast in the first hour after getting up before I do anything else everyday
    If you aren't a breakfast person I wouldn't force it.
    The studies are a bit conflicting on breakfast at this point.  The finer details of nutrition, dieting, and metabolism are incredibly difficult to hammer out because there are so so many variables, including individual anatomy and physiology.

    Essentially, breakfast can be an integral part of a diet/body composition strategy, and so can skipping it.  There are many ways to achieve the same results, but what studies have really shown is that neither skipping nor partaking in breakfast is bad for you.  The old adages about the importance of breakfast seem to be more about cultural tradition than anything else.

    Personally, breakfast doesn't work for me, it opens the gate/breaks the seal on eating for the day and will actually cause me to eat a bigger lunch and sooner in many cases.  There is very often an "appetizer" effect for me.
    Instead of having breakfast, I eat a Greek yogurt or a protein drink.  I avoid carbs and focus on protein alone to try to prevent muscle catabolism and also avoid a large insulin response which directs the growth of fat storage.  Lower insulin levels equal higher fat loss and lower muscle loss, which is why people use fasting to lose fat, as fasting is the best way to keep insulin levels low.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 15,484
    rgambs said:
    rgambs said:
    Breakfast can be a part of dieting for body composition but it really isn't necessary and is more likely to hurt than help.
    Most of the information spread by health experts through the 80's and 90's is completely unrelated to actual research.  The biggest, most pervasive, and ridiculous myth that health experts have perpetuated is the "starvation mode myth".
    It's total BS.  It makes some sense logically, but it isn't based on physiology and it isn't true.
    Entire swaths of the internet are a wasteland of fat people telling other fat people they need to eat more to lose weight!  There are seriously people out there that will swear the less they eat the more weight they gain.  How in the hell is that possible?  It isn't.  Simple physics blows that apart.  Your metabolic rate does slow when you deprive your body of calories.  Adaptive thermogenesis is a real and documented effect of starvation, but it requires actual starvation and isn't engaged simply because you are 1200 calories for the day.
    Your metabolic rate is effected by quite a few factors, but almost never to the degree that people believe.  We are talking about rate changes that equate to tens of calories in most cases, less than a full size candy bar in nearly all cases.
    Long story short, when you deprive your body of calories, your body eats itself.  Period.

    Quite a few studies have shown that people who eat breakfast tend to have more body fat than those that don't, the assumption is that it is due to a simple increase in caloric intake.  Most people who have even minor food addiction issues (aka, you enjoy junk food) will eat the same size lunch regardless of breakfast intake.
    Intermittent fasting and the research behind it has blown the importance of breakfast right off the map.
    I could link some studies and abstracts sometime, it's a fascinating subject that we are just beginning to really understand.
    I would love to read more about this. I am not sure I would be able to understand a study (English is not my first language and I am not a very scientific person) but, if you know of any articles based on the science, that'd be great. Because I force myself to eat breakfast in the first hour after getting up before I do anything else everyday
    If you aren't a breakfast person I wouldn't force it.
    The studies are a bit conflicting on breakfast at this point.  The finer details of nutrition, dieting, and metabolism are incredibly difficult to hammer out because there are so so many variables, including individual anatomy and physiology.

    Essentially, breakfast can be an integral part of a diet/body composition strategy, and so can skipping it.  There are many ways to achieve the same results, but what studies have really shown is that neither skipping nor partaking in breakfast is bad for you.  The old adages about the importance of breakfast seem to be more about cultural tradition than anything else.

    Personally, breakfast doesn't work for me, it opens the gate/breaks the seal on eating for the day and will actually cause me to eat a bigger lunch and sooner in many cases.  There is very often an "appetizer" effect for me.
    Instead of having breakfast, I eat a Greek yogurt or a protein drink.  I avoid carbs and focus on protein alone to try to prevent muscle catabolism and also avoid a large insulin response which directs the growth of fat storage.  Lower insulin levels equal higher fat loss and lower muscle loss, which is why people use fasting to lose fat, as fasting is the best way to keep insulin levels low.
    I don't do a big breakfast anymore either.  I do a hard boiled egg and some juice.  A few hours later I'll do a banana or a tuna packet then lunch.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 9,051
    rgambs said:
    rgambs said:
    Breakfast can be a part of dieting for body composition but it really isn't necessary and is more likely to hurt than help.
    Most of the information spread by health experts through the 80's and 90's is completely unrelated to actual research.  The biggest, most pervasive, and ridiculous myth that health experts have perpetuated is the "starvation mode myth".
    It's total BS.  It makes some sense logically, but it isn't based on physiology and it isn't true.
    Entire swaths of the internet are a wasteland of fat people telling other fat people they need to eat more to lose weight!  There are seriously people out there that will swear the less they eat the more weight they gain.  How in the hell is that possible?  It isn't.  Simple physics blows that apart.  Your metabolic rate does slow when you deprive your body of calories.  Adaptive thermogenesis is a real and documented effect of starvation, but it requires actual starvation and isn't engaged simply because you are 1200 calories for the day.
    Your metabolic rate is effected by quite a few factors, but almost never to the degree that people believe.  We are talking about rate changes that equate to tens of calories in most cases, less than a full size candy bar in nearly all cases.
    Long story short, when you deprive your body of calories, your body eats itself.  Period.

    Quite a few studies have shown that people who eat breakfast tend to have more body fat than those that don't, the assumption is that it is due to a simple increase in caloric intake.  Most people who have even minor food addiction issues (aka, you enjoy junk food) will eat the same size lunch regardless of breakfast intake.
    Intermittent fasting and the research behind it has blown the importance of breakfast right off the map.
    I could link some studies and abstracts sometime, it's a fascinating subject that we are just beginning to really understand.
    I would love to read more about this. I am not sure I would be able to understand a study (English is not my first language and I am not a very scientific person) but, if you know of any articles based on the science, that'd be great. Because I force myself to eat breakfast in the first hour after getting up before I do anything else everyday
    If you aren't a breakfast person I wouldn't force it.
    The studies are a bit conflicting on breakfast at this point.  The finer details of nutrition, dieting, and metabolism are incredibly difficult to hammer out because there are so so many variables, including individual anatomy and physiology.

    Essentially, breakfast can be an integral part of a diet/body composition strategy, and so can skipping it.  There are many ways to achieve the same results, but what studies have really shown is that neither skipping nor partaking in breakfast is bad for you.  The old adages about the importance of breakfast seem to be more about cultural tradition than anything else.

    Personally, breakfast doesn't work for me, it opens the gate/breaks the seal on eating for the day and will actually cause me to eat a bigger lunch and sooner in many cases.  There is very often an "appetizer" effect for me.
    Instead of having breakfast, I eat a Greek yogurt or a protein drink.  I avoid carbs and focus on protein alone to try to prevent muscle catabolism and also avoid a large insulin response which directs the growth of fat storage.  Lower insulin levels equal higher fat loss and lower muscle loss, which is why people use fasting to lose fat, as fasting is the best way to keep insulin levels low.
    Why isn’t the Greek yoghurt or the protein drink considered breakfast? I thought the deal with intermittent fasting was no food for the majority of the day. I have fruit and yoghurt in the morning and consider that breakfast. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • FoxyRedLaFoxyRedLa Lauren / MIPosts: 4,773
    Anything consumed more than 30 calories some say 40 some say 50 calories will break a fast. Protein anything for sure will break a fast. He may be referring to what he does before he works out.
    Oh please let it rain today.
    Those that can be trusted can change their mind.
  • FoxyRedLaFoxyRedLa Lauren / MIPosts: 4,773
    Sorry would like to add he isn't trying to lose weight lol
    Oh please let it rain today.
    Those that can be trusted can change their mind.
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,525
    Yeah, I'm not fasting I'm just on a calorie reduction plan that emphasizes preservation of lean mass.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,525
    Carbs for breakfast seems to the one idea that's universally considered unwise, other than by the dogmatic breakfast crowd that doesn't concern themselves with scientific research as much as they concern themselves with upholding adages.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • FoxyRedLaFoxyRedLa Lauren / MIPosts: 4,773
    I agree gambs. The average American breakfast is donuts, bagels, cereals, pop tarts lol all so good tasting but not good for our insides. 
    Oh please let it rain today.
    Those that can be trusted can change their mind.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 15,484
    FoxyRedLa said:
    I agree gambs. The average American breakfast is donuts, bagels, cereals, pop tarts lol all so good tasting but not good for our insides. 
    I was doing a bagel or egg sandwich on a roll everyday.  I stopped doing bread, sans a special occasion now and it's changed me.

    I'm doing 900 calories a day on average now and I'm noticing the difference.  I'm hoping that my body doesn't try to load up on fat though like Gambs was saying but for right now, last 2 weeks it seems to be working.


  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,525
    FoxyRedLa said:
    I agree gambs. The average American breakfast is donuts, bagels, cereals, pop tarts lol all so good tasting but not good for our insides. 
    I was doing a bagel or egg sandwich on a roll everyday.  I stopped doing bread, sans a special occasion now and it's changed me.

    I'm doing 900 calories a day on average now and I'm noticing the difference.  I'm hoping that my body doesn't try to load up on fat though like Gambs was saying but for right now, last 2 weeks it seems to be working.


    That's pretty low, keep your protein up and don't miss your strength training or you will be losing roughly as much muscle as fat.  I wouldn't worry about storing fat, that's unlikely, but I would worry about losing muscle.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 9,051
    I have started doing planks daily. Someone challenged me to a "plank off" a few days ago, and I had never done one, but I'm just a little bit competitive so I managed 4:01 to her 3:35. However, I suspect my form wasn't perfect, even though I tried, so am now doing planks each morning and focusing more on proper form rather than max plank (my own little physics joke that makes me smile). Right now I'm doing 2:30 planks but will work up again over time as I suspect this will further help my climbing.

    I can't remember if we've discussed planks. Anyone else do these regularly?
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 15,484
    I have started doing planks daily. Someone challenged me to a "plank off" a few days ago, and I had never done one, but I'm just a little bit competitive so I managed 4:01 to her 3:35. However, I suspect my form wasn't perfect, even though I tried, so am now doing planks each morning and focusing more on proper form rather than max plank (my own little physics joke that makes me smile). Right now I'm doing 2:30 planks but will work up again over time as I suspect this will further help my climbing.

    I can't remember if we've discussed planks. Anyone else do these regularly?
    I do Planks in my routine.  I do 1minute on w 30 seconds of rest at 3 times.  I stopped doing the side planking and do another exercise in its place.

    It's all about form.  I work out with low weights and go for definition.  I'm not that guy tossing the weights after doing my reps...  I'm not there to impress anyone but myself and I'm happy with what is becoming of me!

    #goyou!
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 15,484
    rgambs said:
    FoxyRedLa said:
    I agree gambs. The average American breakfast is donuts, bagels, cereals, pop tarts lol all so good tasting but not good for our insides. 
    I was doing a bagel or egg sandwich on a roll everyday.  I stopped doing bread, sans a special occasion now and it's changed me.

    I'm doing 900 calories a day on average now and I'm noticing the difference.  I'm hoping that my body doesn't try to load up on fat though like Gambs was saying but for right now, last 2 weeks it seems to be working.


    That's pretty low, keep your protein up and don't miss your strength training or you will be losing roughly as much muscle as fat.  I wouldn't worry about storing fat, that's unlikely, but I would worry about losing muscle.
    Egg in the AM, Tuna packet for snack, salad or wrap for lunch w/bacon, turkey, something w protein and turkey/chicken/steak on weekends for dinner.

    Not sure how much protein I should be intaking?

    I could always up the calorie content but I am full and not feeling hungry during the day.  The tuna packet helps a bunch.  Maybe some almonds in the diet between meals?
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 5,649
    edited April 20
    rgambs said:
    Carbs for breakfast seems to the one idea that's universally considered unwise, other than by the dogmatic breakfast crowd that doesn't concern themselves with scientific research as much as they concern themselves with upholding adages.
    Here' my 2 cents....

    At one time I was a nationally  ranked age-group  Ironman triathlete So I had to have breakfast. I had to eat multiple  meals every day to keep the tank fueled. A good balance  of cards, fat, protein with an emphasis on a lot of protein.

    Now that I am long retired and don't  have the daily caloric consumption that I used to enjoy I eat a diet very heavy on protein and very low on carbs.. Including a very protein heavy almost no carbs breakfast  on a daily basis.

    There is no white food  in my house. No white rice, no white  potatoes, no white pasta, no white bread, etc

    This process  has allowed me to stay active, eat what I like, and keep my body at a healthy level. Good weight, good body fat level, good numbers in bloodwork.

    Every body is different. Do the research and do what works best for you and keeps you healthy.

    And planks  are a regular part of my core workout
    Post edited by Bentleyspop on
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 15,484
    rgambs said:
    Carbs for breakfast seems to the one idea that's universally considered unwise, other than by the dogmatic breakfast crowd that doesn't concern themselves with scientific research as much as they concern themselves with upholding adages.
    Here' my 2 cents....

    At one time I was a nationally  ranked age-group  Ironman triathlete So I had to have breakfast. I had to eat multiple  meals every day to keep the tank fueled. A good balance  of cards, fat, protein with an emphasis on a lot of protein.

    Now that I am long retired and don't  have the daily caloric consumption that I used to enjoy I eat a diet very heavy on protein and very low on carbs.. Including a very protein heavy almost no carbs breakfast  on a daily basis.

    There is no white food  in my house. No white rice, no white  potatoes, no white pasta, no white bread, etc

    This process  has allowed me to stay active, eat what I like, and keep my body at a healthy level. Good weight, good body fat level, good numbers in bloodwork.

    Every body is different. Do the research and do what works best for you and keeps you healthy.

    And planks  are a regular part of my core workout
    I've given up the "whites" too!  I miss Mac n cheese though.  Ain't gonna lie.  Annies was the bomb!
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 9,051
    rgambs said:
    FoxyRedLa said:
    I agree gambs. The average American breakfast is donuts, bagels, cereals, pop tarts lol all so good tasting but not good for our insides. 
    I was doing a bagel or egg sandwich on a roll everyday.  I stopped doing bread, sans a special occasion now and it's changed me.

    I'm doing 900 calories a day on average now and I'm noticing the difference.  I'm hoping that my body doesn't try to load up on fat though like Gambs was saying but for right now, last 2 weeks it seems to be working.


    That's pretty low, keep your protein up and don't miss your strength training or you will be losing roughly as much muscle as fat.  I wouldn't worry about storing fat, that's unlikely, but I would worry about losing muscle.
    Egg in the AM, Tuna packet for snack, salad or wrap for lunch w/bacon, turkey, something w protein and turkey/chicken/steak on weekends for dinner.

    Not sure how much protein I should be intaking?

    I could always up the calorie content but I am full and not feeling hungry during the day.  The tuna packet helps a bunch.  Maybe some almonds in the diet between meals?
    I can’t picture eating that little and not being hungry. Then again, I’m not looking to lose any weight so I don’t have that motivation to cut back on food. I have almonds with my fruit and yoghurt each morning. 

    Maybe I’ll try doing plank reps instead of straight through. I’ll consider it. 
     
    #goyou!
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • FoxyRedLaFoxyRedLa Lauren / MIPosts: 4,773
    rgambs said:
    Carbs for breakfast seems to the one idea that's universally considered unwise, other than by the dogmatic breakfast crowd that doesn't concern themselves with scientific research as much as they concern themselves with upholding adages.
    Here' my 2 cents....

    At one time I was a nationally  ranked age-group  Ironman triathlete So I had to have breakfast. I had to eat multiple  meals every day to keep the tank fueled. A good balance  of cards, fat, protein with an emphasis on a lot of protein.

    Now that I am long retired and don't  have the daily caloric consumption that I used to enjoy I eat a diet very heavy on protein and very low on carbs.. Including a very protein heavy almost no carbs breakfast  on a daily basis.

    There is no white food  in my house. No white rice, no white  potatoes, no white pasta, no white bread, etc

    This process  has allowed me to stay active, eat what I like, and keep my body at a healthy level. Good weight, good body fat level, good numbers in bloodwork.

    Every body is different. Do the research and do what works best for you and keeps you healthy.

    And planks  are a regular part of my core workout
    I've given up the "whites" too!  I miss Mac n cheese though.  Ain't gonna lie.  Annies was the bomb!
    Cauliflower mac n cheese baby!!!
    Oh please let it rain today.
    Those that can be trusted can change their mind.
  • markymark550markymark550 Columbia, SCPosts: 4,323
    I have started doing planks daily. Someone challenged me to a "plank off" a few days ago, and I had never done one, but I'm just a little bit competitive so I managed 4:01 to her 3:35. However, I suspect my form wasn't perfect, even though I tried, so am now doing planks each morning and focusing more on proper form rather than max plank (my own little physics joke that makes me smile). Right now I'm doing 2:30 planks but will work up again over time as I suspect this will further help my climbing.

    I can't remember if we've discussed planks. Anyone else do these regularly?
    I used to do planks 2-3 times a week, but haven't done them in months. I basically quit doing abs/core work because 1) I'll never have visible abs and 2) I'm stealing the powerlifter mantra that the compound barbell exercises is enough core work.
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,525
    I have started doing planks daily. Someone challenged me to a "plank off" a few days ago, and I had never done one, but I'm just a little bit competitive so I managed 4:01 to her 3:35. However, I suspect my form wasn't perfect, even though I tried, so am now doing planks each morning and focusing more on proper form rather than max plank (my own little physics joke that makes me smile). Right now I'm doing 2:30 planks but will work up again over time as I suspect this will further help my climbing.

    I can't remember if we've discussed planks. Anyone else do these regularly?
    I used to do planks 2-3 times a week, but haven't done them in months. I basically quit doing abs/core work because 1) I'll never have visible abs and 2) I'm stealing the powerlifter mantra that the compound barbell exercises is enough core work.
    I'm with you there.  I don't see the point of direct ab work for anyone that isnt training for a dynamic sport.  I can hold a Planck length for 3 or 4 minutes and do 20 clean leg raises from my other training alone and I don't see what benefit there is from further training directly.
    Now that it's spring and hiking season is back I need increased abdominal and oblique stability, but I train that by carrying a loaded pack dynamically, because the best training for what you do is what you do.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 9,051
    So far 2 votes pro, 2 votes con =)
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 9,051
    Honestly, the best ab workout for me is climbing overhangs and bouldering tunnels, but I don’t do that every day. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 5,649
    So far 2 votes pro, 2 votes con =)g
    Core isn't as important to some as to others.
    I will never have a 6pack but yet I feel that not having a strong core is a mistake and having a strong core is essential so I keep at it.
    I work the core from all angles. Not just sit ups or planks or hanging leg lifts. 

  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 9,051
    So far 2 votes pro, 2 votes con =)g
    Core isn't as important to some as to others.
    I will never have a 6pack but yet I feel that not having a strong core is a mistake and having a strong core is essential so I keep at it.
    I work the core from all angles. Not just sit ups or planks or hanging leg lifts. 

    I don’t see it as about appearance, I see it as about function. In my experience having a strong core is essential for the activities I have want to do, and helps protect my back. Before I got into climbing I used to have periodic back trouble, like many people. Nothing serious but it was a pain. I don’t think I’ve had so much as a twinge in my back in the last year, which is great. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • curmudgeonesscurmudgeoness Brigadoon, foodie capitalPosts: 2,488
    rgambs said:
    Carbs for breakfast seems to the one idea that's universally considered unwise, other than by the dogmatic breakfast crowd that doesn't concern themselves with scientific research as much as they concern themselves with upholding adages.

    I used to make a point of eating breakfast every day. Even when I was young and clueless, it quickly became clear to me that no good came from eating a carb-heavy breakfast. One summer when I was in college, I would stop and get a muffin for breakfast before boarding the train. By the time I got to work, half an hour later, I was ravenous. All the sugar just made me want to eat more.

    Since I have an epic case of "runner's tummy," "breakfast" for me now is twelve almonds. If I had a very light dinner or burned a ton of calories the day before, I'll add a Tbsp. of raisins for the sugar. Then at 10 or 10:30, I have (plain) Greek yogurt, some fruit, rice krispies and almondmilk if I'm really hungry. I'm sure I've said it before, but, once I started paying more attention to the composition of what I was eating and made more of an effort to get enough protein, I began to experience fewer cravings and to lose more body fat.
    All those who seek to destroy the liberties of a democratic nation ought to know that war is the surest and shortest means to accomplish it.
  • curmudgeonesscurmudgeoness Brigadoon, foodie capitalPosts: 2,488
    I don't do a lot of planks. I DO do core work, every day. It''s about form and function, for me. I'll admit I'm vain enough that I'm psyched, as a woman/mother approaching fifty, to have a six-pack; my husband's pretty excited about that, too, LOL. And I find that having a strong core is useful for the things I do (running, lifting, jiujitsu) and for the things I want to learn to do.
    All those who seek to destroy the liberties of a democratic nation ought to know that war is the surest and shortest means to accomplish it.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 9,051
    I don't do a lot of planks. I DO do core work, every day. It''s about form and function, for me. I'll admit I'm vain enough that I'm psyched, as a woman/mother approaching fifty, to have a six-pack; my husband's pretty excited about that, too, LOL. And I find that having a strong core is useful for the things I do (running, lifting, jiujitsu) and for the things I want to learn to do.
    You're only approaching 50? Ha! I've got you beat. 50 is in my rearviewmirror.
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,525
    May is going to be a pull-up month. I think I'm going to shoot for 1,000.
    Ugh.
    Pull-ups suck.  They are so hard.
    I've taken 2 weeks off running because of shin splints, now in May I'm looking to crank the weight loss up.
    I got my diet under control and lost 5 lbs so it's time to turn it up!  I can smell the blood in the water now and Im finally feeling motivated on the weight loss.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
Sign In or Register to comment.