How About a Pearl Jam Obscure Fact Repository

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  • ckravitz wrote:

    By the way, did you actually just read this entire thing??!!

    Damn right I did! :D

    I come on here every day hoping to see this thread bumped with more tidbits!
    Cool. I don't know what got into me with that last one. Next time, it will be much shorter. And perhaps, in my mind, the biggest obscure fact ever!! How's that for hype :D
    Never mind about that next one, I just debunked my own fact :oops: What happened was I read a quote from Mike McCready about Eddie collaborating with Novoselic and Grohl, which blew my mind... until it dawned on me he was referring to Watt's 'Against the 70's'. Oh well. But since we are talking about Watt, here is a warmhearted quote he shares about Mr. Vedder:

    "Eddie told me that a lady broke into his house a few days ago- burned down the front door, raided the refrigerator and wouldn't get out. He had to call the police. Most punk rockers dont have to deal with that! But Eddie got on the phone with her psychiatrist before he called the police. That's the kind of guy Eddie is, but people aren't going to know that unless they meet him. He's really a down-to-earth guy who kind of won the lottery. His band got all big, but I think he'd still be the same kind of guy if his band hadn't gotten big."

    And I might as well throw in this obscurity about Eddie and Krist Novoselic. On August 14th, 1994 at the Garlic Festival in Arlington, Washington Eddie Vedder joined an impromptu group that included Krist Novoselic and the (former) Nirvana guitar tech on a rendition of The Beatles' 'I am a Walrus' for about 250 people! Did I mention this was on a farm?!
  • ckravitzckravitz NJPosts: 1,666
    "He's really a down-to-earth guy who kind of won the lottery."

    It's funny because in one of the PJ20 DVDs (I forget which) there is a segment with Eddie at his house and there are a few sentences of dialogue that really give you this exact feeling. He comments something about being lucky that he met Irons by chance. Was a very humble moment. Granted that was specifically for film, but it definitely came across genuine.
  • pleathermanpleatherman Posts: 383
    edited December 2013
    Okay, for some reason, I seem to be on a drummer kick. Last one, I swear. Its gotten to the point where I can spell "Abbruzzese" by heart!

    Dave Abbruzzese always assumed agreeing to the "Modern Drummer" cover story, after he was asked not to, is what led to his eventual dismissal. However Eddie Vedder's good friend, Stewart Copeland (from The Police), once asked him why Dave got fired and got a different answer:
    "I asked Eddie Vedder why he fired Dave and he said it was because he did an ad with Tama drums. I mean, Jesus Christ. Singers just don't like drummers, huh? Eddie's great, but he is a singer."

    So there you go. I'd also like to add Copeland gladly admitted, if he could play with anyone, it would be Eddie Vedder and Tom Morello.
    While on the subject, Melody Maker magazine once reported in 1994 that Eddie planned on collaborating with Copeland on a series of VH1 unplugged-type performances. A year later, when someone asked about the status of the project, Copeland stated "The Eddie Vedder project is a complete mystery to me. Ask Eddie."
    Post edited by pleatherman on
  • 140303561_dc80bc9fb9.jpg

    Dennis Flemion's note, reprinted on the No Code Polaroid, is credited as the inspiration for the lyrics to 'Smile.' But what was the inspiration for Dennis' note? Turns out it came from a song of his brother's, Jimmy Flemion, called "This is How I Feel." But I'll let him tell it.
    Here is the true story behind the song lyrics to the song “Smile” by Pearl Jam, straight from the horse’s mouth or rather Frogs pen. I write this in response to everyone’s idea of what the lyrics are, where they came from, from the perspective of someone who was there and lived it. Eddie Vedder invited us to play 2 shows with Pearl Jam when they came to Milwaukee on July 8th and 9th of 1995 @ the Marcus Amphitheater. During the 1st show, side story, I was doing my climb on top of speakers or something high routine, whereupon jumping across to make my leap, I misjudged the length in the air and my shin hit the side of an anvil flight case, as mother would say,”full blast” (one of mother’s phrases, Dennis and I would laugh about). I could feel it at the time “smarting” (sounds like one of mother’s winner words) but in show biz the show goes on. After the show, I sat down on the steps backstage, rolled back my green sequined pants and discovered my calf resembled a giant bowling pin. The emergency room’s suggested remedy was ice. The next day I awoke and could barely lift my leg, it felt like it weighed a 100 lbs. I called in sick to my day job. That night for the show on July 9th, I could barely lift my leg to stomp on the pedal board, yet still managed to jump into the crowd that night. O.K. back to the gist of this “extraordinary” story about the song. On July 9th, 1995, Eddie came over to our house in the afternoon, and when the ice cream truck came down our street he ran with Dennis’ children, Paul and Sarah and bought them some ice cream. What does this have to do with story behind the song lyrics to the song “Smile” by Pearl Jam, were about to get into the incredible details right about now. Later in the afternoon, we drove Eddie back to the venue for soundcheck. On the way to the summerfest grounds, Dennis played Eddie a song of mine, “This Is How I Feel” that I wrote on June 6, 1995 and completed on June 11, 1995. The lyrics read as follows:

    This is how I feel when I’m happy
    This is how I feel when I’m sad
    This is how I feel
    Nothing has appeal
    This is how I feel underwater
    This is how I feel after suicide
    I’ll live over and over and over again
    I have escaped nothing can touch me
    This is how I feel without armor
    This is how i feel at a party
    Don’t it make you cry when the sky don’t shine
    Don’t it make you cry
    Don’t it make you cry
    Don’t it make you smile on the other side
    Don’t it make you smile
    Don’t it make you smile
    Don’t it make you smile
    Don’t it make you smile
    This is how I feel when I’m homesick
    This is how I feel when I’m sick
    This is how I feel
    Nothing does the trick anymore

    So let us awaken and return once again to the aforementioned breathtaking tale. What was it again, oh yeah, that’s right. the song “Smile”. After the 2nd show on July 9th, 1995, Dennis and I were backstage sitting on a couch in Pearl jam’s dressing room. When Dennis spotted Eddie’s notebook, he picked it up. Dennis asked me what the lyrics to my song “This Is How I Feel” were. I told him. He asked me if I was o.k. with what he wrote in Eddie’s notebook. He was showing me what he was writing, adding the word “you” before the word “smile” and saying that, “When the sun don’t shine” was better than my, “When the sky don’t shine”. Dennis also drew 3 crooked hearts and swirls on the notebook page. So when Eddie sings “3 crooked hearts, swirls all around” that is what he is referring to.
  • Eddie Vedder referenced a passage from Kurt Vonnegut's novel Breakfast of Champions to use as his song publishing name, "Innocent Bystander."
  • majleap3majleap3 Posts: 208
    -It's hard not to notice The Who logo on Eddie's telecaster.
    Pearl-Jam-Austin-City-Limits.jpg
    But those aren't the only musical heroes he pays homage to. A closer look reveals a Johnny Ramone sticker. Gabba-Gabba Hey!
    johnny_ramone_sticker_eddie_vedder_guitar_telecaster.jpg



    -It is commonly understood why Pearl Jam hasn't performed 'Angel' since 1994. But for those needing confirmation, back in 2000 Eddie gave an interview to an underground radio station in Chicago when the DJs posed that very question. In probably the only occurrence the singer has mentioned Dave in an interview after his departure, Eddie indeed revealed they do not perform 'Angel' because the drummer who played guitar on the song is not in the band anymore. Then after the DJ stammered in pronouncing "Abbruzzese," Eddie joked that was a reason he was no longer part of the band, followed by a heartfelt "sorry Dave."


    -If any long-time fans want to feel old, here is an interesting update on what Kelly Curtis' daughter, pictured below, has been up to.
    51NIRdg%252BJEL._SS500_.jpg
    Jessica Curtis has followed in her father's footsteps and now manages the band "The Young Evils." And the lead singer of the group happens to be Lance Mercer's (PJ's official photographer from the early days) daughter, Mackenzie Mercer. Mackenzie also participated in Fat Kid Rules the World soundtrack with Mike McCready. Oh, and just to tie things up in a nice bow, Lance Mercer took that picture of Jessica for the Jeremy single.


    -Speaking of Lance Mercer, I always imagined the photo from the inside cover of Vs. with the band sitting in a circle by the campfire was taken at "The Site," an idyllic studio/living area in San Rafael, California where the album was recorded.
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-C3NlWNOt6Qg/TlSdcn-D1EI/AAAAAAAABL8/1t-y1qawD5o/s1600/DSCF8550.JPG
    Turns out the picture was taken later while staying at some cabin in Olympic Peninsula for the sole purpose of a photo shoot, along with many other promotional pictures that have circulated around that time.

    Thank you for the picture tidbit!!! I thought the same thing.

    Love this thread!
  • majleap3majleap3 Posts: 208
    And I might as well throw in this obscurity about Eddie and Krist Novoselic. On August 14th, 1994 at the Garlic Festival in Arlington, Washington Eddie Vedder joined an impromptu group that included Krist Novoselic and the (former) Nirvana guitar tech on a rendition of The Beatles' 'I am a Walrus' for about 250 people! Did I mention this was on a farm?![/quote]

    Two days late on August 16th Ed was in New Orleans in court for his public drunkenness charge from the previous year!
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 14,924
    I'd also like to add Copeland gladly admitted, if he could play with anyone, it would be Eddie Vedder and Tom Morello.
    Now that would be one hell of a collaboration!
  • pleathermanpleatherman Posts: 383
    edited December 2013
    majleap3 wrote:
    Two days late on August 16th Ed was in New Orleans in court for his public drunkenness charge from the previous year!

    Well, The Garlic Festival was a two-day event so maybe Eddie showed up on the 13th? Funny, that case ended almost as soon as it started because the two witnesses testifying against Vedder did not seem believable to the judge. Eddie just wished he could have told his part of the story.
    And that isn't the only time a judge took Eddie's side on a case- here is a news story from a month after the one in New Orleans:
    September 16, 1994
    "A judge in Boulder, Colo., has thrown out a charge against Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder. Police accused Vedder, 29, of interfering with police who were removing a rowdy fan from a "mosh pit," an area for dancing in front of the stage, at a concert at the University of Colorado last November. The band canceled a third concert after the incident."
    Post edited by pleatherman on
  • fox_mulderXfox_mulderX Posts: 1,134
    Billy likes to drink soda.
    Mrs. Lippy's car is green.
  • Neil Young and Pearl Jam's "Mirrorball" tour was originally designed to be a hodgepodge of material that included Eddie and Neil trading vocal duties on each other's songs!

    The short but memorable "Neil Jam" tour in '95 tore through Europe that summer. Eddie's absence kind of made sense since he played a minimal role in the making of "Mirrorball." And yet that wasn't how the tour was actually planned from the get go. First off, Brendan O'Brien's inclusion only happened because Vedder bowed out.
    O'Brien: I get a call from Pearl Jam's manager and I hear, "Hey, Neil's going on tour and he wants you to come play keyboards and sing, because Eddie's not going... and Eddie's the only one who could play all of the keyboards parts and sing the background."

    Most of the set lists for the shows were predominantly the same, consisting of selections from "Mirrorball" along with Neil's older material. In truth, those sets were a contingency after Eddie opted out of the tour. Back when his involvement was still assured, Neil had this to say about it in an interview with Guitar World.
    Interviewer: (Is Pearl Jam) learning the Neil Young songbook?
    Young: We won’t do any of the old ones... The way it’ll work is they’ll do Eddie’s songs and then they’ll do my songs. Sometimes I sing some of Eddie’s songs, and sometimes he sings on my songs. There’s a long way that it could develop.
  • RiotZactRiotZact Posts: 5,018
    Neil Young and Pearl Jam's "Mirrorball" tour was originally designed to be a hodgepodge of material that included Eddie and Neil trading vocal duties on each other's songs!

    The short but memorable "Neil Jam" tour in '95 tore through Europe that summer. Eddie's absence kind of made sense since he played a minimal role in the making of "Mirrorball." And yet that wasn't how the tour was actually planned from the get go. First off, Brendan O'Brien's inclusion only happened because Vedder bowed out.
    O'Brien: I get a call from Pearl Jam's manager and I hear, "Hey, Neil's going on tour and he wants you to come play keyboards and sing, because Eddie's not going... and Eddie's the only one who could play all of the keyboards parts and sing the background."

    Most of the set lists for the shows were predominantly the same, consisting of selections from "Mirrorball" along with Neil's older material. In truth, those sets were a contingency after Eddie opted out of the tour. Back when his involvement was still assured, Neil had this to say about it in an interview with Guitar World.
    Interviewer: (Is Pearl Jam) learning the Neil Young songbook?
    Young: We won’t do any of the old ones... The way it’ll work is they’ll do Eddie’s songs and then they’ll do my songs. Sometimes I sing some of Eddie’s songs, and sometimes he sings on my songs. There’s a long way that it could develop.

    Damn that would have been awesome! What was Ed's reason for backing out of that one?
  • RiotZact wrote:
    Neil Young and Pearl Jam's "Mirrorball" tour was originally designed to be a hodgepodge of material that included Eddie and Neil trading vocal duties on each other's songs!

    The short but memorable "Neil Jam" tour in '95 tore through Europe that summer. Eddie's absence kind of made sense since he played a minimal role in the making of "Mirrorball." And yet that wasn't how the tour was actually planned from the get go. First off, Brendan O'Brien's inclusion only happened because Vedder bowed out.
    O'Brien: I get a call from Pearl Jam's manager and I hear, "Hey, Neil's going on tour and he wants you to come play keyboards and sing, because Eddie's not going... and Eddie's the only one who could play all of the keyboards parts and sing the background."

    Most of the set lists for the shows were predominantly the same, consisting of selections from "Mirrorball" along with Neil's older material. In truth, those sets were a contingency after Eddie opted out of the tour. Back when his involvement was still assured, Neil had this to say about it in an interview with Guitar World.
    Interviewer: (Is Pearl Jam) learning the Neil Young songbook?
    Young: We won’t do any of the old ones... The way it’ll work is they’ll do Eddie’s songs and then they’ll do my songs. Sometimes I sing some of Eddie’s songs, and sometimes he sings on my songs. There’s a long way that it could develop.

    Damn that would have been awesome! What was Ed's reason for backing out of that one?

    Wish I knew. Your guess is as good as mine.
    It's funny how much convincing it took to get Brendan to go along for the ride on that tour. After turning down both managers, a call directly from Neil finally did the trick.
    That tactic was less than effective on Pearl Jam's standing offer for Brendan to play keys on tour during the pre-Boom era. O'Brien was already considered the sixth member of the group by then, according to McCready. Had he joined Pearl Jam on all of their tour dates, that probably would have sealed the deal. For now, if I had to bestow membership on a sixth bandmate, his name could only be Brendan O'Boom!
  • ckravitzckravitz NJPosts: 1,666
    RiotZact wrote:

    Damn that would have been awesome! What was Ed's reason for backing out of that one?

    Wish I knew. Your guess is as good as mine.

    I don't have any documentation for this, but I thought I had read somewhere that it had to do with an over the top stalker.
  • ckravitz wrote:
    RiotZact wrote:

    Damn that would have been awesome! What was Ed's reason for backing out of that one?

    Wish I knew. Your guess is as good as mine.

    I don't have any documentation for this, but I thought I had read somewhere that it had to do with an over the top stalker.
    I remember that was part of the reason he wasn't present for most of the recording for Mirrorball, which granted, was over and done with insanely quick. There were even tentative plans for another session in April of '95. Had that happened, maybe Eddie would have been more involved. Huh, there tends to be a lot of "what if?" scenarios for Pearl Jam. Anyways, the stalker problem has been an ongoing thing, so that could be a reason he wasn't around for the tour either. I really have no idea.
  • What sounds like incomprehensible gibberish at approximately the 3 second mark of 'Bugs' is actually Eddie singing "Give Up!" played backwards.
  • majleap3majleap3 Posts: 208
    In reference to Ed and Krist Novoselic playing the garlic festival together; I'm researching when Ed recorded Against the 70's and Big Train with Mike Watt and it was sometime between March 29 and Sep 11th of 94. Since they both played on Against the 70's together maybe it was recorded around April 94? I have an insane desire to know when and where everything was recorded! Any help would be appreciated :)
  • majleap3majleap3 Posts: 208
    I meant August not April
  • pleathermanpleatherman Posts: 383
    edited December 2013
    majleap3 wrote:
    In reference to Ed and Krist Novoselic playing the garlic festival together; I'm researching when Ed recorded Against the 70's and Big Train with Mike Watt and it was sometime between March 29 and Sep 11th of 94. Since they both played on Against the 70's together maybe it was recorded around April 94? I have an insane desire to know when and where everything was recorded! Any help would be appreciated :)
    majleap3 wrote:
    I meant August not April

    I respect your insanity, and indeed "Against the 70's" was recorded in August '94 in Los Angeles.
    Post edited by pleatherman on
  • majleap3majleap3 Posts: 208
    Pleatherman are you 100% sure? I ask because I also noticed some of the Ballhog or Tug Boat album was recorded at Robert Lang Studios in Seattle. And since Dave and Krist played on Against the 70's as well it makes it convenient to have been recorded there. Plus I went to the Robert Lang Studios website and it lists Eddie Vedder as having recorded there. I can't recall him ever recording there. Not being argumentative just trying to flesh out all of the facts.

    You seem to have a ton of knowledge and I've learned a lot from this thread and look forward to learning more.
  • pleathermanpleatherman Posts: 383
    edited December 2013
    majleap3 wrote:
    Pleatherman are you 100% sure? I ask because I also noticed some of the Ballhog or Tug Boat album was recorded at Robert Lang Studios in Seattle. And since Dave and Krist played on Against the 70's as well it makes it convenient to have been recorded there. Plus I went to the Robert Lang Studios website and it lists Eddie Vedder as having recorded there. I can't recall him ever recording there. Not being argumentative just trying to flesh out all of the facts.

    You seem to have a ton of knowledge and I've learned a lot from this thread and look forward to learning more.
    Yeah, I was also thinking it makes sense for it to be recorded in Seattle since Grohl and Novoselic also play on that track. Along with an original source I read from a magazine that gave the date and location of the recording, there is an article written upon "Ballhog or Tugboat?"s release that states the following:
    "Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder, trying to pass the time while a band was setting up to record a track for Mike Watt’s solo album, decided to do some Dumpster-diving in an alley behind a California studio. Vedder found a discarded wet suit and, in a weird attempt at inspiration, put it on while recording the antinostalgia rant, “Against the ‘70s.”

    Usually, when something seems off, I'll use multiple sources to either support or refute it. But who knows?
    Post edited by pleatherman on
  • majleap3majleap3 Posts: 208
    majleap3 wrote:
    Pleatherman are you 100% sure? I ask because I also noticed some of the Ballhog or Tug Boat album was recorded at Robert Lang Studios in Seattle. And since Dave and Krist played on Against the 70's as well it makes it convenient to have been recorded there. Plus I went to the Robert Lang Studios website and it lists Eddie Vedder as having recorded there. I can't recall him ever recording there. Not being argumentative just trying to flesh out all of the facts.

    You seem to have a ton of knowledge and I've learned a lot from this thread and look forward to learning more.
    Yeah, I was also thinking it makes sense for it to be recorded in Seattle since Grohl and Novoselic also play on that track. Along with an original source I read from a magazine that gave the time and date of the recording, there is an article written upon "Ballhog or Tugboat?"s release that states the following:
    "Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder, trying to pass the time while a band was setting up to record a track for Mike Watt’s solo album, decided to do some Dumpster-diving in an alley behind a California studio. Vedder found a discarded wet suit and, in a weird attempt at inspiration, put it on while recording the antinostalgia rant, “Against the ‘70s.”

    Usually, when something seems off, I'll use multiple sources to either support or refute it. But who knows?


    Man that is interesting. Do you know the exact date?
  • majleap3 wrote:
    majleap3 wrote:
    Pleatherman are you 100% sure? I ask because I also noticed some of the Ballhog or Tug Boat album was recorded at Robert Lang Studios in Seattle. And since Dave and Krist played on Against the 70's as well it makes it convenient to have been recorded there. Plus I went to the Robert Lang Studios website and it lists Eddie Vedder as having recorded there. I can't recall him ever recording there. Not being argumentative just trying to flesh out all of the facts.

    You seem to have a ton of knowledge and I've learned a lot from this thread and look forward to learning more.
    Yeah, I was also thinking it makes sense for it to be recorded in Seattle since Grohl and Novoselic also play on that track. Along with an original source I read from a magazine that gave the time and date of the recording, there is an article written upon "Ballhog or Tugboat?"s release that states the following:
    "Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder, trying to pass the time while a band was setting up to record a track for Mike Watt’s solo album, decided to do some Dumpster-diving in an alley behind a California studio. Vedder found a discarded wet suit and, in a weird attempt at inspiration, put it on while recording the antinostalgia rant, “Against the ‘70s.”

    Usually, when something seems off, I'll use multiple sources to either support or refute it. But who knows?


    Man that is interesting. Do you know the exact date?
    If only. But more importantly, here is a transcription between Eddie, Krist, and Mike Watt from self-pollution radio.
    Eddie: Um. That uh ... I guess Dave. Uh. Most of that was recorded up here. Wasn't it? Seattle. (Watt:Yeah it was) I mean I was there.
    Watt: Yep. I guess, yeah. In three different towns. Frankenstein.
    Eddie: Oh, because...
    Watt: The Cookwood brothers did it here, and Mascis did ...
    Eddie: and Jay Mascis did it in New York, and Dave Grohl did it here and I played some guitar up here.
    Watt: Right, In Bob Lang's hole.
    Krist: Bob's bunker.

    So it was made in Seattle! There's still a chance Eddie's vocals might have been done in L.A. because he only talks about recording guitar in Seattle. Thanks for bringing this up. Now I've lost all credibility. :cry:
  • majleap3majleap3 Posts: 208
    If only. But more importantly, here is a transcription between Eddie, Krist, and Mike Watt from self-pollution radio.
    Eddie: Um. That uh ... I guess Dave. Uh. Most of that was recorded up here. Wasn't it? Seattle. (Watt:Yeah it was) I mean I was there.
    Watt: Yep. I guess, yeah. In three different towns. Frankenstein.
    Eddie: Oh, because...
    Watt: The Cookwood brothers did it here, and Mascis did ...
    Eddie: and Jay Mascis did it in New York, and Dave Grohl did it here and I played some guitar up here.
    Watt: Right, In Bob Lang's hole.
    Krist: Bob's bunker.

    So it was made in Seattle! There's still a chance Eddie's vocals might have been done in L.A. because he only talks about recording guitar in Seattle. Thanks for bringing this up. Now I've lost all credibility. :cry:[/quote]

    Not at all! You were right on the most important part which is Ed was stripping himself of the wetsuit while singing! Which was at Cherokee in LA. Now we have the full story. Thanks!

    You mentioned you knew the exact date?
  • majleap3majleap3 Posts: 208
    Nice find on the transcripts BTW!
  • pleathermanpleatherman Posts: 383
    edited December 2013
    If only. But more importantly, here is a transcription between Eddie, Krist, and Mike Watt from self-pollution radio.
    Eddie: Um. That uh ... I guess Dave. Uh. Most of that was recorded up here. Wasn't it? Seattle. (Watt:Yeah it was) I mean I was there.
    Watt: Yep. I guess, yeah. In three different towns. Frankenstein.
    Eddie: Oh, because...
    Watt: The Cookwood brothers did it here, and Mascis did ...
    Eddie: and Jay Mascis did it in New York, and Dave Grohl did it here and I played some guitar up here.
    Watt: Right, In Bob Lang's hole.
    Krist: Bob's bunker.

    So it was made in Seattle! There's still a chance Eddie's vocals might have been done in L.A. because he only talks about recording guitar in Seattle. Thanks for bringing this up. Now I've lost all credibility. :cry:
    majleap3 wrote:
    Not at all! You were right on the most important part which is Ed was stripping himself of the wetsuit while singing! Which was at Cherokee in LA. Now we have the full story. Thanks!

    You mentioned you knew the exact date?
    No, I just knew the month. But I commend you for going after this info because sometimes the more I look into this studio stuff, the more precarious the time frame becomes. A few examples spring to mind.

    -I had always read it only took four days to record Mirrorball with Neil Young. What often got left out in the articles is those four days were not consecutive (Jan. 26-27 and Feb 7, 10).

    -Billboard reported the only two sessions for Lightning Bolt took place in early 2012 and the first quarter of this year. Yet, Pearl Jam was definitely at Henson Studios in L.A. during the spring of 2011 recording for their 10th album.

    -Plus, after recording sessions for any album is finished, there is still the mixing stage which can mean anything from overdubs or, in the case of LBC, lead vocals.
    Post edited by pleatherman on
  • When Pearl Jam fulfilled their 7 album deal with Epic in 2002 (barring the Greatest Hits package that arrived two years later), the independent route seemed almost like a sure bet. They had long ago turned into a self-sustaining entity for the most part, and put together all their ancillary efforts in-house. There was no reason to sink with the major label ship.
    The band already had a semblance of independence and could continue that transition, with the help of distribution, easier than any other musicians of their stature. But there was a part of PJ that would never be free from Sony- their entire back catalogue, 1991-2002. With that carrot dangling over their head, Pearl Jam did make a concerted effort to renew a contract with Sony and continue their long term relationship. The main bargaining chip on the table being acquisition of those 'masters'. But that was too much of a prized possession for Sony and the Pearl Jam of the early aughts offered a lessened commercial appeal in its stead. So even though both parties would have liked to renew a contract, the necessary concessions couldn't be made and negotiations fell through. That was when Pearl Jam aggressively pursued new methods to release music for future endeavors.
  • I am posting here just so it appears in my "view your posts" section so when I have time I can read the ever-living fuck out of it...
  • KV4053KV4053 Mike's side, crushed up against the stagePosts: 999
    When Pearl Jam fulfilled their 7 album deal with Epic in 2002 (barring the Greatest Hits package that arrived two years later), the independent route seemed almost like a sure bet. They had long ago turned into a self-sustaining entity for the most part, and put together all their ancillary efforts in-house. There was no reason to sink with the major label ship.
    The band already had a semblance of independence and could continue that transition, with the help of distribution, easier than any other musicians of their stature. But there was a part of PJ that would never be free from Sony- their entire back catalogue, 1991-2002. With that carrot dangling over their head, Pearl Jam did make a concerted effort to renew a contract with Sony and continue their long term relationship. The main bargaining chip on the table being acquisition of those 'masters'. But that was too much of a prized possession for Sony and the Pearl Jam of the early aughts offered a lessened commercial appeal in its stead. So even though both parties would have liked to renew a contract, the necessary concessions couldn't be made and negotiations fell through. That was when Pearl Jam aggressively pursued new methods to release music for future endeavors.

    This goes back to my post from a few days ago regarding "The Business of Pearl Jam." 20 years from now, there will be a couple of books on how they became "self sustaining."
    I know I was born and I know that I'll die. The in between is mine. I am mine.
  • pleathermanpleatherman Posts: 383
    edited December 2013
    KV4053 wrote:
    When Pearl Jam fulfilled their 7 album deal with Epic in 2002 (barring the Greatest Hits package that arrived two years later), the independent route seemed almost like a sure bet. They had long ago turned into a self-sustaining entity for the most part, and put together all their ancillary efforts in-house. There was no reason to sink with the major label ship.
    The band already had a semblance of independence and could continue that transition, with the help of distribution, easier than any other musicians of their stature. But there was a part of PJ that would never be free from Sony- their entire back catalogue, 1991-2002. With that carrot dangling over their head, Pearl Jam did make a concerted effort to renew a contract with Sony and continue their long term relationship. The main bargaining chip on the table being acquisition of those 'masters'. But that was too much of a prized possession for Sony and the Pearl Jam of the early aughts offered a lessened commercial appeal in its stead. So even though both parties would have liked to renew a contract, the necessary concessions couldn't be made and negotiations fell through. That was when Pearl Jam aggressively pursued new methods to release music for future endeavors.

    This goes back to my post from a few days ago regarding "The Business of Pearl Jam." 20 years from now, there will be a couple of books on how they became "self sustaining."

    Back in 2002, Kelly Curtis had this to say:
    "I wish I had a crystal ball," Curtis said of the band's future with Epic. "We aren't any further along than we were six months ago. There have been some negotiations, but they stop and then they start up again, and then they stop."

    Since that time, it's fair to say PJ's music has gotten more accessible and they no longer shy away from marketing themselves either. The band has been proven willing to play the "game." Because of that, I can't help but speculate if either Sony or Pearl Jam has ever tried to reach out for a counter-offer. Or maybe it is too late.
    Post edited by pleatherman on
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