Introduce an obscure old band/artist you think people should hear

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Comments

  • Guy DudebroGuy Dudebro Posts: 1,051
    Yefa said:
    Causa Sui

    Motorpsycho
    Motorpsycho? From Southern California? 
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,090


    Al Jourgansen and Paul Barker from Ministry along with Jello Biafra.  “Forkboy” was on the Natural Born Killers Soundtrack and is also on “The Last Temptation of Reid”; an awesome album. 


    They did 2 albums and I loved them both.  The Power of Lard and The Last Temptation of Reid!  I never did listen to Pure Chewing Satisfaction...
  • Guy DudebroGuy Dudebro Posts: 1,051


    Al Jourgansen and Paul Barker from Ministry along with Jello Biafra.  “Forkboy” was on the Natural Born Killers Soundtrack and is also on “The Last Temptation of Reid”; an awesome album. 


    They did 2 albums and I loved them both.  The Power of Lard and The Last Temptation of Reid!  I never did listen to Pure Chewing Satisfaction...
    This is one is pretty entertaining too:

  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,090


    Al Jourgansen and Paul Barker from Ministry along with Jello Biafra.  “Forkboy” was on the Natural Born Killers Soundtrack and is also on “The Last Temptation of Reid”; an awesome album. 


    They did 2 albums and I loved them both.  The Power of Lard and The Last Temptation of Reid!  I never did listen to Pure Chewing Satisfaction...
    This is one is pretty entertaining too:

    Might as well post his stuff w Chumba Wumba, nomeansno and Mojo Nixon too!
  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Posts: 5,013
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,299
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Posts: 5,013
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 


  • Go BeaversGo Beavers Posts: 7,657
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"


    Do you have the Coriky album that came out last year? Has Ian MacKaye, Amy Farina, and Joe Lally. I really like it.
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,299
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,090
    Brian I understand what you are saying.  Basically Fugazi never got a tour bus or on first class planes.  They toured in a bus and still have that DIY mentality where PJ matured and went a different route.

    I do think that when musicians get "comfortable" they lose their creative edge.
  • BIGDaddyWilBIGDaddyWil MichiganPosts: 2,761
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"


    Do you have the Coriky album that came out last year? Has Ian MacKaye, Amy Farina, and Joe Lally. I really like it.

    I love the Coriky album!
    Pine Knob Music Theatre - Jul 31, 1992 Crisler Arena - Mar 20, 1994
    Summerfest - Jul 09, 1995*Savage Hall - Sep 22, 1996The Palace of Auburn Hills-Aug 23, 1998 Breslin Center- Aug 18, 1998,The Palace of Auburn Hills-Oct 07, 2000 DTE Energy Theatre-Jun5,2003,DTE Energy Music Theatre - Jun 26, 2003Sports Arena - Oct 02, 2004 Van Andel Arena - May 19, 2006Palace of Auburn Hills-May 22, 2006 Quicken Loans Arena-May 09, 2010
    10-16-2014 Detroit
  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Posts: 5,013
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:

    Neither of us will change each other’s mind. 😂
    All good man
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,299
    Brian I understand what you are saying.  Basically Fugazi never got a tour bus or on first class planes.  They toured in a bus and still have that DIY mentality where PJ matured and went a different route.

    I do think that when musicians get "comfortable" they lose their creative edge.
    I agree.  But I also have had this long standing hope that Pearl Jam will step out of their comfort zone one of these days and hit it out of the park again like, for example, what Neil Young did with Freedom and then even more so with Ragged Glory .
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:

    Neither of us will change each other’s mind. 😂
    All good man

    LOL, Not a problem.  It would be tremendously boring around here if we all had the same viewpoint on things.
    Cheers, 1T!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Posts: 5,013
    brianlux said:
    Brian I understand what you are saying.  Basically Fugazi never got a tour bus or on first class planes.  They toured in a bus and still have that DIY mentality where PJ matured and went a different route.

    I do think that when musicians get "comfortable" they lose their creative edge.
    I agree.  But I also have had this long standing hope that Pearl Jam will step out of their comfort zone one of these days and hit it out of the park again like, for example, what Neil Young did with Freedom and then even more so with Ragged Glory .
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:

    Neither of us will change each other’s mind. 😂
    All good man

    LOL, Not a problem.  It would be tremendously boring around here if we all had the same viewpoint on things.
    Cheers, 1T!
    Honestly, I enjoy friendly keyboard jousts with you an tng on here because it never gets personal and you fellas always keep your sense of humour. No name calling, etc. 
    You definitely have a point… the comparison to NY certainly helps your case. 
  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Posts: 5,013
    Back on topic. I’ll keep beating the drum of this fabulous artist… she won’t be obscure for long imo:

  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,299
    brianlux said:
    Brian I understand what you are saying.  Basically Fugazi never got a tour bus or on first class planes.  They toured in a bus and still have that DIY mentality where PJ matured and went a different route.

    I do think that when musicians get "comfortable" they lose their creative edge.
    I agree.  But I also have had this long standing hope that Pearl Jam will step out of their comfort zone one of these days and hit it out of the park again like, for example, what Neil Young did with Freedom and then even more so with Ragged Glory .
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:

    Neither of us will change each other’s mind. 😂
    All good man

    LOL, Not a problem.  It would be tremendously boring around here if we all had the same viewpoint on things.
    Cheers, 1T!
    Honestly, I enjoy friendly keyboard jousts with you an tng on here because it never gets personal and you fellas always keep your sense of humour. No name calling, etc. 
    You definitely have a point… the comparison to NY certainly helps your case. 
    Sweet, man, I love hearing that.  :plus_one:

    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,299
    I'm guessing/ hoping that Billy Bragg is not considered an obscure musician's name around here.  But just in case, I want to mention him in this thread.   I was listing to this album this evening and every time I listen to it I'm blown away.  So damn good!

    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,090
    brianlux said:
    Brian I understand what you are saying.  Basically Fugazi never got a tour bus or on first class planes.  They toured in a bus and still have that DIY mentality where PJ matured and went a different route.

    I do think that when musicians get "comfortable" they lose their creative edge.
    I agree.  But I also have had this long standing hope that Pearl Jam will step out of their comfort zone one of these days and hit it out of the park again like, for example, what Neil Young did with Freedom and then even more so with Ragged Glory .
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:

    Neither of us will change each other’s mind. 😂
    All good man

    LOL, Not a problem.  It would be tremendously boring around here if we all had the same viewpoint on things.
    Cheers, 1T!
    Honestly, I enjoy friendly keyboard jousts with you an tng on here because it never gets personal and you fellas always keep your sense of humour. No name calling, etc. 
    You definitely have a point… the comparison to NY certainly helps your case. 
    Me too, even though you're wrong most of the time...
    Bah dum bump!

    I just realized that the third person in that pic w Ian and Henry is Keith Morris.  What a great pic of HC royalty.

    Still wrong!
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,299
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"


    Do you have the Coriky album that came out last year? Has Ian MacKaye, Amy Farina, and Joe Lally. I really like it.

    No , GB, but I will have to look into that album!

    Yes, CK, well said.  Three of the greatest right there, and such a cool photo!
    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Posts: 5,013
    brianlux said:
    Brian I understand what you are saying.  Basically Fugazi never got a tour bus or on first class planes.  They toured in a bus and still have that DIY mentality where PJ matured and went a different route.

    I do think that when musicians get "comfortable" they lose their creative edge.
    I agree.  But I also have had this long standing hope that Pearl Jam will step out of their comfort zone one of these days and hit it out of the park again like, for example, what Neil Young did with Freedom and then even more so with Ragged Glory .
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:

    Neither of us will change each other’s mind. 😂
    All good man

    LOL, Not a problem.  It would be tremendously boring around here if we all had the same viewpoint on things.
    Cheers, 1T!
    Honestly, I enjoy friendly keyboard jousts with you an tng on here because it never gets personal and you fellas always keep your sense of humour. No name calling, etc. 
    You definitely have a point… the comparison to NY certainly helps your case. 
    Me too, even though you're wrong most of the time...
    Bah dum bump!

    I just realized that the third person in that pic w Ian and Henry is Keith Morris.  What a great pic of HC royalty.

    Still wrong!
    No one having a different opinion on art is wrong. Therefore, I am never wrong… you are wrong for thinking so 😎
  • Maybe not so obscure, but since Eddie brought back Timeless Melody, I gave a listen to The La's, and damn they are good. Their main songwriter is an... interesting character (https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20210315-the-mystery-of-lost-rock-genius-lee-mavers).
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 32,090
    brianlux said:
    Brian I understand what you are saying.  Basically Fugazi never got a tour bus or on first class planes.  They toured in a bus and still have that DIY mentality where PJ matured and went a different route.

    I do think that when musicians get "comfortable" they lose their creative edge.
    I agree.  But I also have had this long standing hope that Pearl Jam will step out of their comfort zone one of these days and hit it out of the park again like, for example, what Neil Young did with Freedom and then even more so with Ragged Glory .
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:

    Neither of us will change each other’s mind. 😂
    All good man

    LOL, Not a problem.  It would be tremendously boring around here if we all had the same viewpoint on things.
    Cheers, 1T!
    Honestly, I enjoy friendly keyboard jousts with you an tng on here because it never gets personal and you fellas always keep your sense of humour. No name calling, etc. 
    You definitely have a point… the comparison to NY certainly helps your case. 
    Me too, even though you're wrong most of the time...
    Bah dum bump!

    I just realized that the third person in that pic w Ian and Henry is Keith Morris.  What a great pic of HC royalty.

    Still wrong!
    No one having a different opinion on art is wrong. Therefore, I am never wrong… you are wrong for thinking so 😎
    Now see that's where you're wrong... =)
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 37,299
    I think Chris Cacavas is great.  Member of both Green on Red and The Dream Syndicate and has made some terrific solo works. 


    "I believe in the mystery, and I don't want to take it any further than that. Maybe what I mean by that is love."
    -John Densmore











  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Posts: 5,013
    brianlux said:
    Brian I understand what you are saying.  Basically Fugazi never got a tour bus or on first class planes.  They toured in a bus and still have that DIY mentality where PJ matured and went a different route.

    I do think that when musicians get "comfortable" they lose their creative edge.
    I agree.  But I also have had this long standing hope that Pearl Jam will step out of their comfort zone one of these days and hit it out of the park again like, for example, what Neil Young did with Freedom and then even more so with Ragged Glory .
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    brianlux said:
    I'm not a big fan of the world "should" but I'll add to this thread two bands that were mentioned by Eddie Vedder in this article:  Dead Moon
    and Fugazi:


    I found the article very frustrating because the very thing Vedder has loved about Dead Moon (and others he mentioned like Fugazi) was the "the ritual, and the sweat, and the love" and the fact that they never lost their edge does not well define where Vedder himself has gone.  There is a juncture where artists like Vedder and Pearl Jam reach where the path that one takes continues to maintain a creative edge or lapse into the lap of luxury or fail all together.  Dead Moon and Fuagzi never lost their edge.  I wish I could say the same for Vedder and Pearl Jam.  But who knows, maybe Eddie's upcoming solo album will prove me wrong.  One can only hope.
    Dead Moon isn't very good imo so I won’t comment if they still have “edge”. 

    As for Fugazi, are you trying to tell me The Argument has the same edge as say Repeater? I would say it doesn’t. Is it a great album, of course! I love Fugazi… but it’s far from the best and “edgiest” Fugazi. It reminds me of Quicksand’s latest release. Love it, but it’s a post-hardcore record that could be played on our local “alternative” rock station that plays PJ, Nirvana and Our Lady Peace. It’s a mature post-hardcore sound. Very cool. 

    Recent PJ releases sound like a mature band still rocking out and not mailing it in. Can’t say I love any of the past three albums, but they are all good to very good imo. Music doesn’t always require an edge to be good. Some edgy music is good, some of it is downright awful.  And old guy bands who try to sound edgy come across a little disingenuous to me. 


    I don't know how you define "very good" but I would never describe Dead Moon as a polished band.  Their grit, soul, and spirited performance is what makes them a great band.  It's no surprise that Vedder described seeing them as one of the highlights of a life time of seeing live music.  I totally get that.  But, sure, it's not for everyone.

    What I mean regarding Fugazi is that they never showed any interst in becoming popular or going corporate rock.  Of course, that goes with out saying, right guys?
    IMG
    "You really need to ask that?"

    I still don’t see the argument. PJ isn’t Fugazi. Jeff and Stone wanted to be successful musicians. PJ made a great album that instantly made them stars, they weren’t going for a corporate rock sound and certainly weren’t trying to be popular with that album. If they were they would have wrote “Cherry Pie”. 
    Basically, the mainstream came to them not the other way around.

    Since then they have done it their own way, not caring about people telling them what they “should” do. 



    Playing stadiums is not going for a corporate rock image?
    Well, OK then, I think we are just going to have to accept our differences on this one.
    And look, my point is not to simply put down Pearl Jam.  I mean, after all, they put on one of the great shows I've ever seen including  first rate performances by big names like Jimi Hendrix, The Who, U2, The Clash, plus scads of lesser known greats whose shows were also remarkable, and, going back to my earlier point, at least as lesser known as Fugazi and Dead Moon... who I still would argue are worth checking out...
    ...which I think is what this thread is about.  :lol:

    Neither of us will change each other’s mind. 😂
    All good man

    LOL, Not a problem.  It would be tremendously boring around here if we all had the same viewpoint on things.
    Cheers, 1T!
    Honestly, I enjoy friendly keyboard jousts with you an tng on here because it never gets personal and you fellas always keep your sense of humour. No name calling, etc. 
    You definitely have a point… the comparison to NY certainly helps your case. 
    Me too, even though you're wrong most of the time...
    Bah dum bump!

    I just realized that the third person in that pic w Ian and Henry is Keith Morris.  What a great pic of HC royalty.

    Still wrong!
    No one having a different opinion on art is wrong. Therefore, I am never wrong… you are wrong for thinking so 😎
    Now see that's where you're wrong... =)
    Lol…
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