I think my guitar is broken... or about to break...

SchmaktSchmakt CharlottePosts: 199
edited March 2004 in Musicians and Gearheads
I don't really know a lot about guitars, but I'm afraid mine is about to break... Has anybody had this happen before?

It's one of those Stratocaster by Squire's... world's most popular electric guitar or something. The strings feed through the back, and up the next. At the bottom of the guitar, where the strings come through and the tremlo(?) bar attach is a metal piece. When you push the bar, that piece bends up to change the sound...

Now it used to be lying flat against the body of the guitar, but I just noticed yesterday that it was bent up and doesn't lay flat unless I force it. Has anyone had this happen and/or know what, if anything, I should or can do about it? Thanks...
2003-04-15: Raleigh, NC
2003-04-16: Charlotte, NC
2004-10-06: Asheville, NC
2006-05-30: Washington, DC
2006-08-29: Arnhem, The Netherlands
2006-12-02: Honolulu, Hawaii
2012-06-26: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2012-09-22: Atlanta, GA
2013-10-30: Charlotte, NC
2014-01-19: Gold Coast, Australia
2014-06-28: Stockholm, Sweden
2014-06-29: Oslo, Norway
2016-04-18: Hampton, VA
2016-04-20: Raleigh, NC
2016-04-21: Columbia, SC
2018-07-01: Prague, Czech Republic
2018-07-03: Krakow, Poland
2018-09-04: Boston, MA
Post edited by Unknown User on

Comments

  • blackredyellowblackredyellow Posts: 5,889
    If I'm understanding you right, the tension on the bridge needs adjusted. Under the plate on the back of the guitar, there are springs that provided tension to the bridge. Either you can add more springs (if there are less than 5 there) or replace them. Squiers have cheap hardware, and I guess that could apply to the springs they use as well.
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  • FinsburyParkCarrotsFinsburyParkCarrots Seattle, WAPosts: 12,175
    Originally posted by blackredyellow
    If I'm understanding you right, the tension on the bridge needs adjusted. Under the plate on the back of the guitar, there are springs that provided tension to the bridge. Either you can add more springs (if there are less than 5 there) or replace them. Squiers have cheap hardware, and I guess that could apply to the springs they use as well.

    Good advice.

    Guitar shop technicians don't usually rip people off; so, Schmakt, if you're a bit nervous about doing the job yourself, entrust the job with a store techie.
  • SchmaktSchmakt CharlottePosts: 199
    awesome! thanks, guys. Really appreciate it
    2003-04-15: Raleigh, NC
    2003-04-16: Charlotte, NC
    2004-10-06: Asheville, NC
    2006-05-30: Washington, DC
    2006-08-29: Arnhem, The Netherlands
    2006-12-02: Honolulu, Hawaii
    2012-06-26: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2012-09-22: Atlanta, GA
    2013-10-30: Charlotte, NC
    2014-01-19: Gold Coast, Australia
    2014-06-28: Stockholm, Sweden
    2014-06-29: Oslo, Norway
    2016-04-18: Hampton, VA
    2016-04-20: Raleigh, NC
    2016-04-21: Columbia, SC
    2018-07-01: Prague, Czech Republic
    2018-07-03: Krakow, Poland
    2018-09-04: Boston, MA
  • mccreadyisgodmccreadyisgod Bumfuq, MTPosts: 6,395
    It's also possible that something has just caught underneath the bridge-plate and held the tremolo out... when you move the tremolo arm, does it have the same resistance/pull-back that it used to have? Are all the strings on there correctly, or has one maybe come loose? I would guess it's probably a lack of proper tension, which would be easily fixed (as mentioned above) by adding or replacing springs... old springs might be worn out, whatever... but it could be something else, too. Make sure everything looks right. You can take the plastic cover off the spring cavity and check, you won't hurt anything just taking that off. And like these guys said, if you don't feel comfortable fooling with it, take it to a tech, explain the problem, and what our thoughts are. They'll be able to figure it out. Good luck...
    ...and if you don't like it, you can suck on an egg.
  • SchmaktSchmakt CharlottePosts: 199
    I took the plate off the back, and I only have two springs. They run diagonally from the inside to the out, so I think you guys were right about the springs being the problem.

    Everything else looks fine as far as I know. There's a wire of some sort soldered (sp??) to one of the hooks where the springs go, but it doesn't seem to be in the way.

    I'll probably take it to Sam Ash to see if they can help. Thanks again!
    2003-04-15: Raleigh, NC
    2003-04-16: Charlotte, NC
    2004-10-06: Asheville, NC
    2006-05-30: Washington, DC
    2006-08-29: Arnhem, The Netherlands
    2006-12-02: Honolulu, Hawaii
    2012-06-26: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2012-09-22: Atlanta, GA
    2013-10-30: Charlotte, NC
    2014-01-19: Gold Coast, Australia
    2014-06-28: Stockholm, Sweden
    2014-06-29: Oslo, Norway
    2016-04-18: Hampton, VA
    2016-04-20: Raleigh, NC
    2016-04-21: Columbia, SC
    2018-07-01: Prague, Czech Republic
    2018-07-03: Krakow, Poland
    2018-09-04: Boston, MA
  • Have you changed anything lately? If you put heavier strings on, they will pull the tremelo out, causing the bridge to pull out like that.
    If you're not in tune, and you keep tuning up so the strings are tighter, they will pull on the trem, too. make sure you are in EADGBE. If you change the tuning you usually have to adjust the springs anyway.
    If it's only 2 springs, they may have stretched. You could probably do with one more tremelo spring anyway. Your guitar isn't going to break, though. No problem playing it, but it might be cool to take it in for a setup anyway. A good tech can make a guitar play nicer than you expected.
    You can try to screw in the tremelo claw to the wood a bit if you want. The screws that hold the springs to the wood body. Just a little bit at a time, and that will pull the bridge back. You might actually be fine after doing that. Just a little at a time, and the same amount of screw turns on each one.

    The wire is the ground wire for the electronics. don't remove that!
    Be kind, man
    Don't be mankind. ~Captain Beefheart
    __________________________________
  • SchmaktSchmakt CharlottePosts: 199
    Originally posted by who's_pearljam?
    Have you changed anything lately? If you put heavier strings on, they will pull the tremelo out, causing the bridge to pull out like that.
    If you're not in tune, and you keep tuning up so the strings are tighter, they will pull on the trem, too. make sure you are in EADGBE. If you change the tuning you usually have to adjust the springs anyway.
    If it's only 2 springs, they may have stretched. You could probably do with one more tremelo spring anyway. Your guitar isn't going to break, though. No problem playing it, but it might be cool to take it in for a setup anyway. A good tech can make a guitar play nicer than you expected.
    You can try to screw in the tremelo claw to the wood a bit if you want. The screws that hold the springs to the wood body. Just a little bit at a time, and that will pull the bridge back. You might actually be fine after doing that. Just a little at a time, and the same amount of screw turns on each one.

    The wire is the ground wire for the electronics. don't remove that!

    that's it!
    I was playing 9's for the longest time, and just switched to 11's. Makes sense. I'll see if I can tighten those screws, but I think I'll take it in on Monday anyway. Thanks again... learning a lot today. :)
    2003-04-15: Raleigh, NC
    2003-04-16: Charlotte, NC
    2004-10-06: Asheville, NC
    2006-05-30: Washington, DC
    2006-08-29: Arnhem, The Netherlands
    2006-12-02: Honolulu, Hawaii
    2012-06-26: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2012-09-22: Atlanta, GA
    2013-10-30: Charlotte, NC
    2014-01-19: Gold Coast, Australia
    2014-06-28: Stockholm, Sweden
    2014-06-29: Oslo, Norway
    2016-04-18: Hampton, VA
    2016-04-20: Raleigh, NC
    2016-04-21: Columbia, SC
    2018-07-01: Prague, Czech Republic
    2018-07-03: Krakow, Poland
    2018-09-04: Boston, MA
  • Originally posted by Schmakt
    that's it!
    I was playing 9's for the longest time, and just switched to 11's. Makes sense. I'll see if I can tighten those screws, but I think I'll take it in on Monday anyway. Thanks again... learning a lot today. :)

    :)
    Cool, Now I can go to bed! I'm glad it worked.
    With 11's you might want another spring or 2 anyway. More springs make a stiffer tremelo, especially if you bend strings when you play, as when you bend one or two strings, the rest of the ringing strings go a bit flat due the the extra pull from your soon to be sore fingers!, depends on the feel that you want. Going from 9's to 11's , you'll want a setup anyway. 11's are a great string to work with once you get used to them.
    Good luck
    Be kind, man
    Don't be mankind. ~Captain Beefheart
    __________________________________
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