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Our Daily Experiences Ruled by Symbols

Ms. HaikuMs. Haiku Washington DC Posts: 7,250
edited December 2023 in A Moving Train
I was planning on putting this in AET, but with race and religion in my question I guess it goes here.

What are parts of our daily lives that are ruled by arbitrary standards, rituals and/or symbols? The ones I thought of so far are:

Time
Language
Weather
Race
Religion

Anything else? I'm figuring this out for poetry exercises.

TY!
There is no such thing as leftover pizza. There is now pizza and later pizza. - anonymous
The risk I took was calculated, but man, am I bad at math - The Mincing Mockingbird
Post edited by Ms. Haiku on

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    mickeyratmickeyrat up my ass, like Chadwick was up his Posts: 35,724
    as a professional driver , road signs.
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
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    Go BeaversGo Beavers Posts: 8,610
    edited December 2023
    One standard I find interesting is how physical distance communicates a lot if information about the relationship between people. This also includes posture. You can observe two people together and start to make pretty accurate judgments on their relationship: is this work related, they’re friends, they’re a couple, they’re a parent and child, they’re strangers making small talk. In a busy city, you can tell when two people walking side by side are together, and when two people side by side aren’t. We don’t always consciously note the cues that tell us this, but our brain makes the call just from repetition of patterns. 

    And to add, it’s a lot of subtle non verbals that include, eye contact, angle of lean with the body, squaring the shoulders vs angling out a little, facial expressions, smiling, reciprocation of expressions, head angles up, straight or down a little, amount of physical touching and where also gives a lot of info about the relationship. 
    Post edited by Go Beavers on
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    cblock4lifecblock4life Posts: 1,401
    One standard I find interesting is how physical distance communicates a lot if information about the relationship between people. This also includes posture. You can observe two people together and start to make pretty accurate judgments on their relationship: is this work related, they’re friends, they’re a couple, they’re a parent and child, they’re strangers making small talk. In a busy city, you can tell when two people walking side by side are together, and when two people side by side aren’t. We don’t always consciously note the cues that tell us this, but our brain makes the call just from repetition of patterns. 

    And to add, it’s a lot of subtle non verbals that include, eye contact, angle of lean with the body, squaring the shoulders vs angling out a little, facial expressions, smiling, reciprocation of expressions, head angles up, straight or down a little, amount of physical touching and where also gives a lot of info about the relationship. 
    Excellent observations.  You’ve described this very well. 
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    Ms. HaikuMs. Haiku Washington DC Posts: 7,250
    mickeyrat said:
    as a professional driver , road signs.
    That works!
    There is no such thing as leftover pizza. There is now pizza and later pizza. - anonymous
    The risk I took was calculated, but man, am I bad at math - The Mincing Mockingbird
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    Ms. HaikuMs. Haiku Washington DC Posts: 7,250
    One standard I find interesting is how physical distance communicates a lot if information about the relationship between people. This also includes posture. You can observe two people together and start to make pretty accurate judgments on their relationship: is this work related, they’re friends, they’re a couple, they’re a parent and child, they’re strangers making small talk. In a busy city, you can tell when two people walking side by side are together, and when two people side by side aren’t. We don’t always consciously note the cues that tell us this, but our brain makes the call just from repetition of patterns. 

    And to add, it’s a lot of subtle non verbals that include, eye contact, angle of lean with the body, squaring the shoulders vs angling out a little, facial expressions, smiling, reciprocation of expressions, head angles up, straight or down a little, amount of physical touching and where also gives a lot of info about the relationship. 
    Very cool!
    There is no such thing as leftover pizza. There is now pizza and later pizza. - anonymous
    The risk I took was calculated, but man, am I bad at math - The Mincing Mockingbird
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    GlowGirlGlowGirl New York, NY Posts: 9,851
    One standard I find interesting is how physical distance communicates a lot if information about the relationship between people. This also includes posture. You can observe two people together and start to make pretty accurate judgments on their relationship: is this work related, they’re friends, they’re a couple, they’re a parent and child, they’re strangers making small talk. In a busy city, you can tell when two people walking side by side are together, and when two people side by side aren’t. We don’t always consciously note the cues that tell us this, but our brain makes the call just from repetition of patterns. 

    And to add, it’s a lot of subtle non verbals that include, eye contact, angle of lean with the body, squaring the shoulders vs angling out a little, facial expressions, smiling, reciprocation of expressions, head angles up, straight or down a little, amount of physical touching and where also gives a lot of info about the relationship. 
    What you are describing is called proxemics and it is part of our ways of communicating non-verbally. However, it is very cultural. If you go to another culture you may not be able to decipher some of these behaviors as readily as you would in your own culture. It’s really interesting. 
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    HobbesHobbes Pacific Northwest Posts: 6,383
    Consumerism.
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    brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain. Posts: 40,694
    Interesting question!
    How about this, perhaps as something that directs how we stand and move:
    Stanchion - Wikipedia

    “The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man [or woman] who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”
    Variously credited to Mark Twain or Edward Abbey.













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