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Ted Greene

Does anyone here use Ted Greene's books Chord Chemistry and Modern Chord Progressions as a learning base? Does anyone refer to the Ted Greene videos on YouTube? Share your love for the 'Yoda of guitar' here.


Comments

  • static111static111 Posts: 1,413
    Always wanted to get into chord chemistry. Never thought I had a good enough handle on music theory. After several years of self study I think I may be able to comprehend it finally.
  • FinsburyParkCarrotsFinsburyParkCarrots Seattle, WAPosts: 12,223
    edited May 2
    static111 said:
    Always wanted to get into chord chemistry. Never thought I had a good enough handle on music theory. After several years of self study I think I may be able to comprehend it finally.
    Ted Greene's good to study in conjunction with Jens Larsen's videos on YouTube, as Jens explains how soloing around triads, arpeggios and chord tones adds a real feeling of the chordal movement of a song whereas just doing single-note modal runs might sometimes be a bit lacking. 

    Allan Holdsworth used to talk about using scales in relation to their chord 'families' as well, and while Holdsworth's musical terminology was idiosyncratic and unorthodox, he certainly opens up opportunities for thinking about soloing in ways that emphasize the most pertinent notes and tones of the chords of a tune. 

    What I love about these guitarists' wisdom is that they never lose sight of the fact that their techniques are aimed towards articulating the song first and foremost. Not too many years ago, a lot of this knowledge went right over my head, but the Internet's a great way for helping self-taught musicians such as us to get to grips with some of the mechanics and rationale of what Greene et al were doing.

    Here's a great site that you might like regarding Holdsworth, and some good links to pages in that site: 

    https://fretboardknowledge.com/guitar/kb/allan-holdsworths-10-most-usable-scales/
    https://fretboardknowledge.com/kb/the-fretboard-knowledge-list-of-most-common-chord-types/
    Post edited by FinsburyParkCarrots on
  • static111static111 Posts: 1,413
    static111 said:
    Always wanted to get into chord chemistry. Never thought I had a good enough handle on music theory. After several years of self study I think I may be able to comprehend it finally.
    Ted Greene's good to study in conjunction with Jens Larsen's videos on YouTube, as Jens explains how soloing around triads, arpeggios and chord tones adds a real feeling of the chordal movement of a song whereas just doing single-note modal runs might sometimes be a bit lacking. 

    Allan Holdsworth used to talk about using scales in relation to their chord 'families' as well, and while Holdsworth's musical terminology was idiosyncratic and unorthodox, he certainly opens up opportunities for thinking about soloing in ways that emphasize the most pertinent notes and tones of the chords of a tune. 

    What I love about these guitarists' wisdom is that they never lose sight of the fact that their techniques are aimed towards articulating the song first and foremost. Not too many years ago, a lot of this knowledge went right over my head, but the Internet's a great way for helping self-taught musicians such as us to get to grips with some of the mechanics and rationale of what Greene et al were doing.

    Here's a great site that you might like regarding Holdsworth, and some good links to pages in that site: 

    https://fretboardknowledge.com/guitar/kb/allan-holdsworths-10-most-usable-scales/
    https://fretboardknowledge.com/kb/the-fretboard-knowledge-list-of-most-common-chord-types/
    Thanks so much.  I took lessons for an entire year about two years ago after 20ish years of self taught.  I can play my scales and modes backwards and forwards though I don’t exactly always know what to do with them. When he talked about playing the scales backward in the video I was like well I must be on t he right track.  It’s always nice to have more resources.
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