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  • PJWGIIIPJWGIII Chicago, ILPosts: 684
    edited November 2018
    Incredible this just happened.
    Jeremy's mom spoke on the news today.

    In all seriousness, as this is a very serious issue, it's interesting to think what must have been going on in the heads of those who knew Jeremy when PJ's song blew up. It's also interesting to think what the band must have thought of that. Would Ed have done things differently knowing this story fully? How does this video now impact your feelings about the song?
    Post edited by PJWGIII on
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  • PJinILPJinIL satan's bedPosts: 389
    Thanks for posting, interesting story. It doesn't change much of anything for me regarding the song's purpose. I do think it will change what I think of as far as the real Jeremy is concerned though. The song does put the parents in a position of fault, Jeremy as somehow abused/neglected. Maybe if the name had been changed, the artistic license of storytelling would've been easier to digest by those who knew Jeremy?

    On the flip side, this is a feature story (not news) and doesn't address any struggles or problems in the home. If he was such a talent with art, it's highly likely he ticked differently than your average kid. Prodigy kids can have real issues if undetected, so without knowing more I'm curious if he may have been one of these kids that became overwhelmed inside and the parents just didn't see it? I don't pretend to know what mental health research looked like 30 years ago, especially with kids. Would a modern psychologist have been able to see something in Jeremy back in the day? 

    I know - for sure - if one of my kids had some extraordinary gift that my wife and I would be aware of these things, but back then it was probably just viewed as a blessing/gift, nothing more. The kid could've been torn up inside.

    I support PJ's artistic interpretation, the message in the song as it is - is more universally understood than telling a story of parents that loved his art and accomplishments but didn't know any better about an underlying problem. It's sad, either way, that a young person has the capacity to do what he did.


    It's amazing what you hear when you take time to listen.
  • bootlegger10bootlegger10 Posts: 11,056
    edited November 2018

    I thought I read somewhere that Jeremy was a combination of two different stories.  The artwork was incredible though for such a young age.

    I can definitely see though from the family and friends perspective how horrible a hit song about the worst event of your life would be (along with a music video).

    Post edited by bootlegger10 on
  • JammalamboJammalambo Posts: 1,126
    edited November 2018

    ...

    I can definitely see though from the family and friends perspective how horrible a hit song about the worst event of your life would be (along with a music video).

    I agree. I always had this kind of double feelings about the song. I personally love it, and it's a meaningful piece of music.
    But on the other side, I know I would be mad towards the band if he was my son, and that perspective would change from meaningful to incredibly distasteful. Honestly, I always thought it was a wrong decision to use his real name. Still, the video is pretty clear and recognizable (expecially at the end), but if the name used was different, it would have been a lot wiser. Jonathan, maybe? Works as a three-syllable word in the chorus, too.
    I would be curious to know if Eddie ever talked (or tried to talk) to the parents, in order to better explain his intentions.
    Post edited by Jammalambo on
  • bootlegger10bootlegger10 Posts: 11,056

    ...

    I can definitely see though from the family and friends perspective how horrible a hit song about the worst event of your life would be (along with a music video).

    I agree. I always had this kind of double feelings about the song. I personally love it, and it's a meaningful piece of music.
    But on the other side, I know I would be mad towards the band if he was my son, and that perspective would change from meaningful to incredibly distasteful. Honestly, I always thought it was a wrong decision to use his real name. Still, the video is pretty clear and recognizable (expecially at the end), but if the name used was different, it would have been a lot wiser. Jonathan, maybe? Works as a three-syllable word in the chorus, too.
    I would be curious to know if Eddie ever talked (or tried to talk) to the parents, in order to better explain his intentions.
    Not trying to be a snowflake, but it is odd when you think about how the way the song is received live and people yell out the lyrics with a smile on their face.   You can say that with a lot of songs from a lot of bands.  Better man, Alive, etc... are songs about pain that are now positive anthems.
  • ...

    I can definitely see though from the family and friends perspective how horrible a hit song about the worst event of your life would be (along with a music video).

    I agree. I always had this kind of double feelings about the song. I personally love it, and it's a meaningful piece of music.
    But on the other side, I know I would be mad towards the band if he was my son, and that perspective would change from meaningful to incredibly distasteful. Honestly, I always thought it was a wrong decision to use his real name. Still, the video is pretty clear and recognizable (expecially at the end), but if the name used was different, it would have been a lot wiser. Jonathan, maybe? Works as a three-syllable word in the chorus, too.
    I would be curious to know if Eddie ever talked (or tried to talk) to the parents, in order to better explain his intentions.
    Not trying to be a snowflake, but it is odd when you think about how the way the song is received live and people yell out the lyrics with a smile on their face.   You can say that with a lot of songs from a lot of bands.  Better man, Alive, etc... are songs about pain that are now positive anthems.
    Legit thought and question - not being a snowflake at all.
    www.cluthelee.com
  • JammalamboJammalambo Posts: 1,126

    ...

    I can definitely see though from the family and friends perspective how horrible a hit song about the worst event of your life would be (along with a music video).

    I agree. I always had this kind of double feelings about the song. I personally love it, and it's a meaningful piece of music.
    But on the other side, I know I would be mad towards the band if he was my son, and that perspective would change from meaningful to incredibly distasteful. Honestly, I always thought it was a wrong decision to use his real name. Still, the video is pretty clear and recognizable (expecially at the end), but if the name used was different, it would have been a lot wiser. Jonathan, maybe? Works as a three-syllable word in the chorus, too.
    I would be curious to know if Eddie ever talked (or tried to talk) to the parents, in order to better explain his intentions.
    Not trying to be a snowflake, but it is odd when you think about how the way the song is received live and people yell out the lyrics with a smile on their face.   You can say that with a lot of songs from a lot of bands.  Better man, Alive, etc... are songs about pain that are now positive anthems.
    Well, now, one thing is a song written about YOUR personal experiences (betterman, alive, rvm), an other thing is a song directly related to something that you basically knows nothing about apart from the little bit you read on the newspaper. On the fist case, yeah, they can very well turn into positive anthems, in the second case.. not so much. I'm genuinely curious, are there other songs like Jeremy? I mean, songs that use real names from real (tragic) piece of news, and written soon after the fact happened? I can't thing of any at the moment.
    Anyway, an example of how you can write a good smart song inspired by a real tragic story is Rival.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 9,204

    ...

    I can definitely see though from the family and friends perspective how horrible a hit song about the worst event of your life would be (along with a music video).

    I agree. I always had this kind of double feelings about the song. I personally love it, and it's a meaningful piece of music.
    But on the other side, I know I would be mad towards the band if he was my son, and that perspective would change from meaningful to incredibly distasteful. Honestly, I always thought it was a wrong decision to use his real name. Still, the video is pretty clear and recognizable (expecially at the end), but if the name used was different, it would have been a lot wiser. Jonathan, maybe? Works as a three-syllable word in the chorus, too.
    I would be curious to know if Eddie ever talked (or tried to talk) to the parents, in order to better explain his intentions.
    Not trying to be a snowflake, but it is odd when you think about how the way the song is received live and people yell out the lyrics with a smile on their face.   You can say that with a lot of songs from a lot of bands.  Better man, Alive, etc... are songs about pain that are now positive anthems.
    Well, now, one thing is a song written about YOUR personal experiences (betterman, alive, rvm), an other thing is a song directly related to something that you basically knows nothing about apart from the little bit you read on the newspaper. On the fist case, yeah, they can very well turn into positive anthems, in the second case.. not so much. I'm genuinely curious, are there other songs like Jeremy? I mean, songs that use real names from real (tragic) piece of news, and written soon after the fact happened? I can't thing of any at the moment.
    Anyway, an example of how you can write a good smart song inspired by a real tragic story is Rival.
    "I Don't Like Mondays", Boomtown Rats - real quotes from a school shooter, though I don't think her name is mentioned in the song.
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • darthvedderdarthvedder Posts: 1,615

    I thought I read somewhere that Jeremy was a combination of two different stories.  The artwork was incredible though for such a young age.

    I can definitely see though from the family and friends perspective how horrible a hit song about the worst event of your life would be (along with a music video).

    Yeah, Eddie had a classmate that brought a gun to school and shot up a fish tank with it, iirc.
  • njnancynjnancy Northern New JerseyPosts: 3,626
    edited November 2018

    ...

    I can definitely see though from the family and friends perspective how horrible a hit song about the worst event of your life would be (along with a music video).

    I agree. I always had this kind of double feelings about the song. I personally love it, and it's a meaningful piece of music.
    But on the other side, I know I would be mad towards the band if he was my son, and that perspective would change from meaningful to incredibly distasteful. Honestly, I always thought it was a wrong decision to use his real name. Still, the video is pretty clear and recognizable (expecially at the end), but if the name used was different, it would have been a lot wiser. Jonathan, maybe? Works as a three-syllable word in the chorus, too.
    I would be curious to know if Eddie ever talked (or tried to talk) to the parents, in order to better explain his intentions.
    Not trying to be a snowflake, but it is odd when you think about how the way the song is received live and people yell out the lyrics with a smile on their face.   You can say that with a lot of songs from a lot of bands.  Better man, Alive, etc... are songs about pain that are now positive anthems.
    Well, now, one thing is a song written about YOUR personal experiences (betterman, alive, rvm), an other thing is a song directly related to something that you basically knows nothing about apart from the little bit you read on the newspaper. On the fist case, yeah, they can very well turn into positive anthems, in the second case.. not so much. I'm genuinely curious, are there other songs like Jeremy? I mean, songs that use real names from real (tragic) piece of news, and written soon after the fact happened? I can't thing of any at the moment.
    Anyway, an example of how you can write a good smart song inspired by a real tragic story is Rival.
    "I Don't Like Mondays", Boomtown Rats - real quotes from a school shooter, though I don't think her name is mentioned in the song.
    Great analogy. 
    https://genius.com/The-boomtown-rats-i-dont-like-mondays-lyrics
    http://murderpedia.org/female.S/s/spencer-brenda.htm
    Post edited by njnancy on
  • cp3iversoncp3iverson Posts: 4,702
    edited November 2018
    As a songwriter you cant get that sensitive or you’ll never write anything down that alley.  

    This is Eddie’s interpretation of the article he read and what he felt.  Interviewing everyone, being concerned with feelings, and acting like the song is a documentary would totally change the point of the song.  
    Post edited by cp3iverson on
  • Stickman24Stickman24 Posts: 198
    edited November 2018
    I ve read before he (Ed) blended two stories to write the song.  As sad as it is. I appreciate ( hope this doesn’t get taken the wrong way) the realness of the song and the impact.  It carries serious weight IMO. 
  • Dr. DelightDr. Delight Posts: 11,026

    And so you see, I have come to doubt
    All that I once held as true
    I stand alone without beliefs
    The only truth I know is you.
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