Canadian Politics Redux

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  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,274
    I gave it some though ... Im just guessing here, but I doubt  Columbia's regularity standards and environmental standards are in the ballpark as are's...this is a country that just ended a 50 year civil war, and has been host to some of the world largest drug cartel's...the government probably had much more important things to worry about...
  • I gave it some though ... Im just guessing here, but I doubt  Columbia's regularity standards and environmental standards are in the ballpark as are's...this is a country that just ended a 50 year civil war, and has been host to some of the world largest drug cartel's...the government probably had much more important things to worry about...

    I'm not necessarily going to disagree with you; however, I'm pretty sure they didn't string together empty paper towel tubes with duct tape. There was a level of engineering and there were levels of planning to prevent a mishap.

    My whole point is that it doesn't matter what level of sophistication supports a pipeline project: once an accident occurs... it is brutal. There is a legitimate element of risk.

    And Columbia is not the only country with a pipeline incident. I only submitted the recent case given the latest context of this thread. Use google (if you haven't already) to peruse at your leisure.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    edited April 2018
    Then why are you arguing...

    personally i I would rather deal with a spill as opposed to an explosion that can happen from rail cars and semi’s...plus I trust the engineers far more than I’ll ever trust an overworked, underpaid semi drive or train engineer...
    Whatever your level of distrust for train engineers and oil tanker truck drivers may mysteriously be, the fact of the matter is that there are far more pipeline spills and oil storage facility accidents than there are oil tanker truck/train accidents.
    And FWIW, my friends in the trades always say that engineers like the guys who give the go-ahead with shit like pipelines and electrical systems and stuff are next to useless 90% of the time. You are putting WAY too much faith in those guys.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    Sounds like a good idea. I'm sure more could be done, and sentencing issues remain obviously, but still, a step in the right direction I think.

    Liberals propose major criminal justice changes to unclog Canada's courts

    Bill ends most preliminary inquiries, updates bail system and changes jury selection process


    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/liberal-crime-justice-reform-1.4598480?cid=


    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,299
    PJ_Soul said:
    Sounds like a good idea. I'm sure more could be done, and sentencing issues remain obviously, but still, a step in the right direction I think.

    Liberals propose major criminal justice changes to unclog Canada's courts

    Bill ends most preliminary inquiries, updates bail system and changes jury selection process


    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/liberal-crime-justice-reform-1.4598480?cid=


    this was my exact thought, and then there it was in print:

    The bill will restrict preliminary inquiries to those accused of an offence punishable by life imprisonment, which is expected to reduce the number of preliminary inquiries by 87 per cent. There are now more than 9,000 a year.

    But many criminal defence lawyers are opposed to the idea, saying it could have the opposite effect, since the preliminary inquiry process can weed out some cases that don't have enough evidence to go to trial.

    I agree 100% with this. the whole point of the prelim inquiry is to stop unwinnable cases from going to trial. now a much higher portion will go to trial, unless you have a fortune-telling DA that will somehow be able to predict which cases would get thrown out and which ones won't. My guess is many DA's will just roll the dice on a trial in hopes of scoring a conviction. or many people will get off scott-free when they shouldn't have because you have a gun shy DA who is being pressured not to waste taxpayer money on anything that isn't a slam dunk. at the very least they should have included serious crimes against the person; assault, sexual assault, rape, etc. 

    and this:

    "In particular, they cited 'condition creep,' where excessive conditions are placed on an accused person in the name of public safety," the report reads. "Participants said that many of these conditions do not contribute to public safety and can set people up to fail, resulting in longer criminal records."

    The report cited the example of alcoholics ordered by courts to stop drinking who don't subsequently get the community support they need to stay away from alcohol.

    the court system isn't designed to be a counselor. The court system is designed to tell you what you need to do to get help. It's not there to hold your hand while you do it. I get it. My sister's husband died from alcoholism. But come on. So a booze hound doesn't show up to court. No consequence. Ok. Four days later he gets behind the wheel and kills a family of 4. Now what?

    Headstones and Watchmen Fan Boy
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    edited April 2018
    I disagree with your assessment of what most DAs will do, and I don't think a DA needs to be a fortune teller to try and predict which cases would get thrown out and which ones won't. I feel that is specifically one of their skills needed for their jobs. I think we need to hold on to at least a little faith in those within the system to employ some common sense here... And honestly, of all the people in the criminal justice system, I'm thinking maybe defense lawyers aren't the very first ones we should be trusting for an objective opinion. But anyway, I guess we'll see how this all shakes out! The bill might not even pass.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,299
    I didn't say most. i said many. 

    I think getting rid of the PH would put undo stress on the DA's office and a higher amount of scrutiny where it doesn't necessarily belong. 

    it was my opinion before I saw it in print. it doesn't matter to me which "side" they are on. I agree with it. and the defence lawyers I have known have been more interested in justice than getting a guilty person off. I have known both prosecutors and defence lawyers, and they are pretty much the same people. I have even known people who have swtiched jobs and in the process switched "sides". 

    saying I disagree with getting rid of the PH does not all of a sudden make me distrusting of the justice system as a whole. 
    Headstones and Watchmen Fan Boy
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    Okay, I disagree with your assessment of what many DAs will do, lol.

    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,449
    I have lots of thoughts on this that I don’t have time to tap out on my phone now but will try to get to later. 

    One picky point, though - Canada does not have DAs. We have Crown prosecutors. And I’m not actually just being picky; DAs have very different roles and expectations. Many are elected, and feel a lot of pressure to bow to public opinion. 

    I work with a lot of people interacting with the legal system, and I see massive delays due to the choices of defence attorneys. They know that things will go better for their clients if they can delay and delay a trial, assuming the client does well in the community and avoids breaching bail conditions. Thus, they often find reasons to ask for stay after stay, and it all drags out. There are definitely other reasons for legal delays, but this is a big one.  
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    Okay, I disagree with HFD's assessment of what many Crown Prosecutors would do. :lol: ;)
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,449
    On a related note, one of the things that I think is most wrong with the American justice system is the fact that many roles are elected positions instead of appointed due to actual competence. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    On a related note, one of the things that I think is most wrong with the American justice system is the fact that many roles are elected positions instead of appointed due to actual competence. 
    I totally agree with you - obviously once people are getting elected for a role, their job is mainly playing politics and greasing wheels rather than their actual job.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon In My PlacePosts: 19,299
    I wouldn't call it an assessment. it's a concern of what I think is possible. But who knows, maybe DA's welcome this as removing an unnecessary step. But that was just the first thought that came to my mind, and it was echoed in the article. 
    Headstones and Watchmen Fan Boy
  • Thirty Bills UnpaidThirty Bills Unpaid Posts: 16,881
    edited April 2018
    On a related note, one of the things that I think is most wrong with the American justice system is the fact that many roles are elected positions instead of appointed due to actual competence. 

    edit: never mind.
    Post edited by Thirty Bills Unpaid on
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,274
    Senators fear legal cannabis will hike number of Canadians barred from entering the U.S.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-senators-fear-legal-cannabis-will-hike-number-of-canadians-barred-from/?click=sf_globefb

    Unless you have a conviction the only way US customs would know is if you are dumb enough to admit you have used cannabis..of course some people are just dumb enough to admit this to the US Customs.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,274
    edited April 2018
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    edited April 2018
    I wonder what they're planning on doing once it's legal in BC, so on both sides of the border? They can't continue with this crap - it would be completely unmanageable. I mean, plenty of border guards are fine with a yes answer to this question, as long as you don't lie to them. If they find you lied (somehow... like find a crumb of weed in your bag, or a random photo with a pipe on the table in the background or someting, lol), that's when they decide you're inadmissable. The problem is that it depends on the border guard you are talking to. And once it's legal in Canada, saying no will just start seeming completely unbelievable for a large number of people.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,274
    The US Customs are federal ... they enforce federals laws of the US ... I do not think they much care what we in Canada think, the US custom officer has the right to ban people, once they ban you, its very hard to get the ban over-turned, I would lie through the teeth ... but once again, the vehicle I use when travelling to the US has never had weed in it, the luggage I use have never had weed in it either ... call me paranoid, I prefer cautious and smart to avoid hassles, and I only once in over 30 years crossing into the states was ever pulled into  secondary inspection, and it was random...and the dogs go all through your car, including engine and trunk compartment...
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    edited April 2018
    The US Customs are federal ... they enforce federals laws of the US ... I do not think they much care what we in Canada think, the US custom officer has the right to ban people, once they ban you, its very hard to get the ban over-turned, I would lie through the teeth ... but once again, the vehicle I use when travelling to the US has never had weed in it, the luggage I use have never had weed in it either ... call me paranoid, I prefer cautious and smart to avoid hassles, and I only once in over 30 years crossing into the states was ever pulled into  secondary inspection, and it was random...and the dogs go all through your car, including engine and trunk compartment...
    I know it's federal, but the Canadian legalization will be federal too, so what, the US plans on banning everyone in Canada who does something legal in their own country? I doubt that.
    Anyway, I have never been asked that question at the border... I'm not sure what I'd do if I was. I'm a pretty bad liar, so I wouldn't be comfortable lying to them about it, mainly because I don't know if they'd believe me, and once they think you're lying about anything, you're done. I also wouldn't have any weed anywhere on me, but them just thinking you're lying because you're an unconvincing liar is enough for them to turn you around if they want... while they certainly don't all turn you back if you admit you've ever smoked weed. And once it's legal in Canada, I mean, soon enough, half the people crossing will have smoked it. So what then? The US knows we help their economy when we enter. 
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,274
    The entire legalization process was poorly put into place, they have way of accurately making sure we do not have stoned drivers and the trudeau liberals never engaged the Americans on this issue...
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    edited April 2018
    The entire legalization process was poorly put into place, they have way of accurately making sure we do not have stoned drivers and the trudeau liberals never engaged the Americans on this issue...
    I totally disagree. Bogging around the nitty gritty when it comes to impaired driving and who America feels would have been an unnecessary delay. Just a bunch of people blabbing and blabbing indefinitely. The way it was done it perfect - it is forcing people who are paid to make decisions actually make decisions in a timely manner. For once. It's great.
    Why in the fuck would the Canadian government engage the Americans on the issue??? They already knew the answer. That would have been the stupidest possible thing to do, and I would have been pissed if the our government had allowed another nation's government dictate anything when it came to this issue.
    For once we're seeing government actually doing something actively and expeditiously, and recognizing that sometimes the best way to change is to just force change. I see that as a good thing.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,274
    Its the only campaign promise he thinks he can live up to ... what a pathetic government.  My major accomplishment, legalizing weed ... lol


  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    edited April 2018
    Its the only campaign promise he thinks he can live up to ... what a pathetic government.  My major accomplishment, legalizing weed ... lol


    That's a pretty massive accomplishment, actually. I don't understand why you're treating it like it's not a really big deal. But it's not actually true that is the only campaign promise he has lived up to. Don't let your biases blind you to fact.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Its the only campaign promise he thinks he can live up to ... what a pathetic government.  My major accomplishment, legalizing weed ... lol


    That's not small at all. It's huge actually.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,449
    Being one of the first countries in the world to fully legalize cannabis, and also bringing in medical assistance in dying, are not minor accomplishments, but some have such an unreasonable dislike that they are blind to that. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,274
    Every one out to fully defend Trudeau, good to see...I would never thank Trudeau for legalizing it ... I don't need the governments permission, I smoked before it was legal and never been hassled...The better question is why do we need the governments permission ... east answer, we don't...

    Trudeau is useless....

    I see he's on another vacation...

    I'm sure the foreign dignitaries will enjoy his socks...
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 47,789
    edited April 2018
    Every one out to fully defend Trudeau, good to see...I would never thank Trudeau for legalizing it ... I don't need the governments permission, I smoked before it was legal and never been hassled...The better question is why do we need the governments permission ... east answer, we don't...

    Trudeau is useless....

    I see he's on another vacation...

    I'm sure the foreign dignitaries will enjoy his socks...
    Your comments here just prove that you're choosing your biases over logic. It's a bit stunning to me how much reality you're ignoring right now. You really seem trapped in some kind of bubble, where nothing that affects you directly on a day to day basis means anything.
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 7,274
    edited April 2018

    Canada's back, when it's convenient

    https://trib.al/ktOsFjv


    Pretty Much....

    From the article...

    “The government’s actions and rhetoric have been inconsistent, at times contradictory and mostly focused on messaging and advancing the Liberal brand than fixing real problems,” according to the 2018 Foreign Policy Report Cardproduced by Carleton University’s School of International Affairs in partnership with the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal. “For a political party that promised to elevate Canada’s position in the world, the Liberal government under Justin Trudeau has achieved remarkably little in the first half of its tenure to meet that goal.”
    Post edited by Meltdown99 on
  • Every one out to fully defend Trudeau, good to see...I would never thank Trudeau for legalizing it ... I don't need the governments permission, I smoked before it was legal and never been hassled...The better question is why do we need the governments permission ... east answer, we don't...

    Trudeau is useless....

    I see he's on another vacation...

    I'm sure the foreign dignitaries will enjoy his socks...
    Lol

    Come on, man.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 10,449
    I was listening to the CBC news yesterday evening. First up, reactions of B.C. residents protesting in Victoria Trudeau’s support of the pipeline. Everyone interviewed was furious. Then off to Alberta, where Trudeau was speaking later in the day. Everyone should be happy, right? Nope. They’re all furious that Trudeau hasn’t approved enough pipelines, fast enough. Literally no way to win. 
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
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