Your opinion about Immigration.

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  • A shortfall of immigrants is worsening widespread labor shortages and hobbling the U.S. economy at a time when more than 10 million jobs remain unfilled, particularly in low-paying and physically demanding industries.

    Alonzo Arteaga’s title is general manager of a small hotel in Topeka, Kan. But these days, he doubles as a housekeeper, making beds, vacuuming floors and laundering towels to fill an ever-worsening worker shortage.

    Like businesses around the country, Senate Luxury Suites is struggling to keep going without critical employees. The hotel is down to three housekeepers, half of what it had before the pandemic, and Arteaga blames a years-long immigration slowdown, which he says has made an already tough situation worse.

    “It’s been three years of trying absolutely everything,” said Arteaga, who has raised pay by about $3 an hour and offers discounted monthly rates to employees. “It feels like the workers really aren’t there.”

    A shortfall of immigrants is worsening widespread labor shortages and hobbling the U.S. economy at a time when more than 10 million jobs remain unfilled, particularly in low-paying and physically demanding industries such as hospitality, agriculture, construction and health care.

    While the slowdown in immigration began well before the pandemic, the covid crisis intensified the process as the Trump administration effectively halted the flow of foreign-born workers into the United States. Although legal immigration has rebounded somewhat since then, particularly in the last six monthsmajor shortages remain, rippling through the economy at a time when the labor force is also missing workers from early retirements, ongoing health problems and caregiving challenges. Labor force shortages are also contributing to higher prices for some goods and services, as companies raise wages to compete for a smaller pool of workers and to keep existing staff.

    The crisis had prompted senators on both sides of the aisle to try to strike a deal that allowed more legal immigration in the weeks before Republicans take control of the House. But those proposals never got off the ground, making an immigration overhaul far less politically feasible.

    “Immigration is something almost everyone agrees needs to be fixed, but it’s become a political wedge issue,” said Tara Watson, an economics professor at Williams College and fellow at the Brookings Institution. “There have been huge bureaucratic delays since the Trump administration. And of course covid really put a wrench in the gears. But this is a long-term structural problem that has not been addressed.”

    Economists say it’s difficult to quantify exactly how many foreign-born workers are missing from the labor force, particularly when it comes to undocumented immigrants. By one estimate, the United States is shy of about 1.7 million legal immigrants based on pre-pandemic migration trends, according to Giovanni Peri, director of the Global Migration Center at the University of California at Davis.

    Even though immigration rates have picked up in recent months, Peri says it could be another four years before the country makes up for current shortfalls. Even then, it won’t be enough to catch up to the rapidly aging workforce that is projected to leave millions more positions unfilled.

    Economists estimate that the lack of immigration is responsible for close to half of the workers missing from the labor force, a deficit Federal Reserve Chair Jerome H. Powell recently estimated to be about 3.5 million workers.

    “There is no question: We need more immigration,” said Adam Ozimek, chief economist at Economic Innovation Group, a nonpartisan business organization. “Immigrants aren’t just workers, they are particularly flexible, mobile workers, who help address acute labor shortages wherever they emerge. And that’s particularly important in this constrained economy we’re facing right now.”

    Visas for college students and highly skilled science and tech workers have bounced back relatively quickly, Peri said. But immigration rates for people without a college education have been slower to make up for lost ground.

    “If someone doesn’t have much education and doesn’t have a close relative in the U.S., there is virtually no legal pathway for them to get a green card," said Watson of Williams College. “There is a pool of untapped talent out there.”

    Trump took office, largely on an anti-immigrant platform. Although his administration didn’t make legislative changes, it slowed down visa processing through “a culture of extreme vetting and extreme delays” that was enough to deter immigration in all forms, especially among those without college educations, Peri said.

    The number of new immigrants entering the country legally each year, which peaked in 2016, fell by 6 percent in 2017 and another 9 percent the following year, according to data from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. But the pandemic dealt the biggest blow: New arrivals plunged 50 percent between 2019 and 2021.

    “Covid caused two years of lost immigration,” Peri said. “Embassies and consulates that release visas were mostly shut down. The processing of green cards in the U.S. was mostly shut down. Even international travel was mostly gone.”

    Many of those situations have since improved, but business owners say it hasn’t been enough to make up for years of lost workers.

    Early in the pandemic, Mariama Lowe lost nearly three-quarters of the employees at her home health-care business in Alexandria, Va., to covid illnesses, career changes and early retirements. She’s since gone from 100 nurses and personal care aides — almost all of them immigrants — to 27.

    “We’re in a very difficult position, because there is nobody to hire anymore,” Lowe said. “Tech companies can go recruit from anywhere; they have all of these avenues available to them. But a home health agency like me? I don’t have that opportunity. I just have to go with whoever’s here and whoever’s available. And right now, it’s not a lot.”

    Beyond creating wider avenues for immigrants to enter the country, business owners, economists and policymakers say there also needs to be a focus on retaining foreign-born workers already in the United States. That includes “dreamers,” undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as young children; recently laid-off tech workers on H1-B visas who may have to leave the country if they don’t find new work within 60 days; and the adult children of highly educated legal immigrants awaiting permanent residency.

    Continues


    Immigration revisions would alleviate worker shortages, businesses say - The Washington Post

    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

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  • I don't know how true this story is for NYC considering we are opening up more asylum houses here in and have a border that is still crowded.

    Maybe the smaller cities are having trouble?
  • I don't know how true this story is for NYC considering we are opening up more asylum houses here in and have a border that is still crowded.

    Maybe the smaller cities are having trouble?
    Does NYC traditionally have jobs that 'Muricans don't want to do? Lots of hospitality jobs in hotels and food service. And the number of work visas for those types of positions has been held at the same number since 2006, I think the article mentioned. Farmers are planting/raising less because they don't have the labor to harvest. Which leads to higher prices, less supply, inflation. Mexico's Gen X'ers and Z'ers don't want that work as they're more educated than in the past. So, that's where immigrants from Central America come in. But you know, the "other." And POOTWH slow walked LEGAL immigration. We're our own worst enemy at times with our combined exploitation and fear mongering. Build the wall. Dumbest fucking campaign slogan ever and tens of millions of 'Muricans fell for it.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

    "If you're looking down on someone, it better be to extend them a hand to lift them up."

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  • I don't know how true this story is for NYC considering we are opening up more asylum houses here in and have a border that is still crowded.

    Maybe the smaller cities are having trouble?
    Does NYC traditionally have jobs that 'Muricans don't want to do? Lots of hospitality jobs in hotels and food service. And the number of work visas for those types of positions has been held at the same number since 2006, I think the article mentioned. Farmers are planting/raising less because they don't have the labor to harvest. Which leads to higher prices, less supply, inflation. Mexico's Gen X'ers and Z'ers don't want that work as they're more educated than in the past. So, that's where immigrants from Central America come in. But you know, the "other." And POOTWH slow walked LEGAL immigration. We're our own worst enemy at times with our combined exploitation and fear mongering. Build the wall. Dumbest fucking campaign slogan ever and tens of millions of 'Muricans fell for it.
    Food industry here just like where you live.  Go into your favorite restaurants kitchen and it's the same. Usually not legals.

    Didn't Trump lose a few of his Mir a laga workers because of his policy?
  • I don't know how true this story is for NYC considering we are opening up more asylum houses here in and have a border that is still crowded.

    Maybe the smaller cities are having trouble?
    Does NYC traditionally have jobs that 'Muricans don't want to do? Lots of hospitality jobs in hotels and food service. And the number of work visas for those types of positions has been held at the same number since 2006, I think the article mentioned. Farmers are planting/raising less because they don't have the labor to harvest. Which leads to higher prices, less supply, inflation. Mexico's Gen X'ers and Z'ers don't want that work as they're more educated than in the past. So, that's where immigrants from Central America come in. But you know, the "other." And POOTWH slow walked LEGAL immigration. We're our own worst enemy at times with our combined exploitation and fear mongering. Build the wall. Dumbest fucking campaign slogan ever and tens of millions of 'Muricans fell for it.
    Food industry here just like where you live.  Go into your favorite restaurants kitchen and it's the same. Usually not legals.

    Didn't Trump lose a few of his Mir a laga workers because of his policy?
    That's the point. Make them legal by upping the numbers allowed in, streamlining the process and understand that the US economy needs people to fill these jobs. Stop being afraid of the "other" and welcome them here. Afterall, they end up being better than native born. 10M unfilled jobs in the US, a loss of 5 years of migrant labor due to POOTWH and covid. Who's cleaning up Flo Rida, by the way? And I'm not insinuating that you're afraid of the "other." Repubs mostly are and deplorables surely are.
    09/15/1998, Mansfield, MA; 08/29/00 08/30/00, Mansfield, MA; 07/02/03, 07/03/03, Mansfield, MA; 09/28/04, 09/29/04, Boston, MA; 09/22/05, Halifax, NS; 05/24/06, 05/25/06, Boston, MA; 07/22/06, 07/23/06, Gorge, WA; 06/29/08, 06/30/08, Mansfield, MA; 08/18/08, O2 London, UK; 10/30/09, 10/31/09, Philadelphia, PA; 05/15/10, Hartford, CT; 05/17/10, Boston, MA; 05/20/10, 05/21/10, NY, NY; 06/22/10, Dublin, IRE; 06/23/10, Northern Ireland; 09/03/11, 09/04/11, Alpine Valley, WI; 09/11/11, 09/12/11, Toronto, Ont; 09/14/11, Ottawa, Ont; 09/15/11, Hamilton, Ont; 07/02/2012, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/04/2012 & 07/05/2012, Berlin, Germany; 07/07/2012, Stockholm, Sweden; 09/30/2012, Missoula, MT; 07/16/2013, London, Ont; 07/19/2013, Chicago, IL; 10/15/2013 & 10/16/2013, Worcester, MA; 10/21/2013 & 10/22/2013, Philadelphia, PA; 10/25/2013, Hartford, CT; 11/29/2013, Portland, OR; 11/30/2013, Spokane, WA; 12/04/2013, Vancouver, BC; 12/06/2013, Seattle, WA; 10/03/2014, St. Louis. MO; 10/22/2014, Denver, CO; 10/26/2015, New York, NY; 04/23/2016, New Orleans, LA; 04/28/2016 & 04/29/2016, Philadelphia, PA; 05/01/2016 & 05/02/2016, New York, NY; 05/08/2016, Ottawa, Ont.; 05/10/2016 & 05/12/2016, Toronto, Ont.; 08/05/2016 & 08/07/2016, Boston, MA; 08/20/2016 & 08/22/2016, Chicago, IL; 07/01/2018, Prague, Czech Republic; 07/03/2018, Krakow, Poland; 07/05/2018, Berlin, Germany; 09/02/2018 & 09/04/2018, Boston, MA;

    "If you're looking down on someone, it better be to extend them a hand to lift them up."

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  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 26,288
    I don't know how true this story is for NYC considering we are opening up more asylum houses here in and have a border that is still crowded.

    Maybe the smaller cities are having trouble?
    Does NYC traditionally have jobs that 'Muricans don't want to do? Lots of hospitality jobs in hotels and food service. And the number of work visas for those types of positions has been held at the same number since 2006, I think the article mentioned. Farmers are planting/raising less because they don't have the labor to harvest. Which leads to higher prices, less supply, inflation. Mexico's Gen X'ers and Z'ers don't want that work as they're more educated than in the past. So, that's where immigrants from Central America come in. But you know, the "other." And POOTWH slow walked LEGAL immigration. We're our own worst enemy at times with our combined exploitation and fear mongering. Build the wall. Dumbest fucking campaign slogan ever and tens of millions of 'Muricans fell for it.
    Food industry here just like where you live.  Go into your favorite restaurants kitchen and it's the same. Usually not legals.

    Didn't Trump lose a few of his Mir a laga workers because of his policy?
    I’ve noticed it’s not just restaurants they work for house contractors, landscaping,house cleaning! I’ve seen those roofing crews get to a house all immigrants and take the roof off in 4 hrs and have new roof on by days end and how about those tree cutting crews those guys are the best climbers! One of those crews took down a 60’ oak in my yard in 8 hrs I was shocked how fast they worked plus how good the climbers were..
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • I don't know how true this story is for NYC considering we are opening up more asylum houses here in and have a border that is still crowded.

    Maybe the smaller cities are having trouble?
    Does NYC traditionally have jobs that 'Muricans don't want to do? Lots of hospitality jobs in hotels and food service. And the number of work visas for those types of positions has been held at the same number since 2006, I think the article mentioned. Farmers are planting/raising less because they don't have the labor to harvest. Which leads to higher prices, less supply, inflation. Mexico's Gen X'ers and Z'ers don't want that work as they're more educated than in the past. So, that's where immigrants from Central America come in. But you know, the "other." And POOTWH slow walked LEGAL immigration. We're our own worst enemy at times with our combined exploitation and fear mongering. Build the wall. Dumbest fucking campaign slogan ever and tens of millions of 'Muricans fell for it.
    Food industry here just like where you live.  Go into your favorite restaurants kitchen and it's the same. Usually not legals.

    Didn't Trump lose a few of his Mir a laga workers because of his policy?
    I’ve noticed it’s not just restaurants they work for house contractors, landscaping,house cleaning! I’ve seen those roofing crews get to a house all immigrants and take the roof off in 4 hrs and have new roof on by days end and how about those tree cutting crews those guys are the best climbers! One of those crews took down a 60’ oak in my yard in 8 hrs I was shocked how fast they worked plus how good the climbers were..
    I used to be a tree climber and landscaper.  Tough work.  You don't find our youth doing that anymore.  Those jobs are actually career paths for people now.
  • NYC removed tent city from Randalls island only to talk about putting it up again.

    After Title 42 ends soon we are expected to receive an additional 1000 asylum seekers a day here.
  • I don't know how true this story is for NYC considering we are opening up more asylum houses here in and have a border that is still crowded.

    Maybe the smaller cities are having trouble?
    Does NYC traditionally have jobs that 'Muricans don't want to do? Lots of hospitality jobs in hotels and food service. And the number of work visas for those types of positions has been held at the same number since 2006, I think the article mentioned. Farmers are planting/raising less because they don't have the labor to harvest. Which leads to higher prices, less supply, inflation. Mexico's Gen X'ers and Z'ers don't want that work as they're more educated than in the past. So, that's where immigrants from Central America come in. But you know, the "other." And POOTWH slow walked LEGAL immigration. We're our own worst enemy at times with our combined exploitation and fear mongering. Build the wall. Dumbest fucking campaign slogan ever and tens of millions of 'Muricans fell for it.
    Food industry here just like where you live.  Go into your favorite restaurants kitchen and it's the same. Usually not legals.

    Didn't Trump lose a few of his Mir a laga workers because of his policy?
    That's the point. Make them legal by upping the numbers allowed in, streamlining the process and understand that the US economy needs people to fill these jobs. Stop being afraid of the "other" and welcome them here. Afterall, they end up being better than native born. 10M unfilled jobs in the US, a loss of 5 years of migrant labor due to POOTWH and covid. Who's cleaning up Flo Rida, by the way? And I'm not insinuating that you're afraid of the "other." Repubs mostly are and deplorables surely are.

    This is a great comment. While the US has a long history of imposing restrictive and racist immigration policies (see: Chinese Exclusion Act), for much of the first half of the 20th century it was easier for people to come to the US work for a time, save money, and return home. Some did so seasonally, then we started punishing people for coming and going and restricting entry (unless you could prove you were a tourist or had a student/work/business owner visa) which in turn made people who came in through irregular means have to stay here or they could never come back. Reagan was a terrible politician, but his administration and congress collaborating on legalizing millions of undocumented people was a huge improvement (see IRCA of 1986). The fact that no other administration has been able to re-do this is an embarrassment. Both parties use the same dehumanizing rhetoric to refer to immigrants as a "illegals", "flood", "wave", "invasion", and their unwillingness to actually address the root causes (bad immigration policy, bad US foreign policy) they seem content to keep people vulnerable and easily exploitable as flexible labor. 

  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,377
    So Cubans are ok. but others from the broader region are not. fleeing for the same or similar reasons.



     
    Cuban migrants flow into Florida Keys, overwhelm officials
    By CODY JACKSON and TERRY SPENCER
    Today

    MARATHON, Fla. (AP) — More than 500 Cuban immigrants have come ashore in the Florida Keys since the weekend, the latest in a large and increasing number who are fleeing the communist island and stretching thin U.S. border agencies both on land and at sea.

    It is a dangerous 100-mile (160-kilometer) trip in often rickety boats — unknown thousands having perished over the years — but more Cubans are taking the risk amid deepening and compounding political and economic crises at home. A smaller number of Haitians are also fleeing their country’s economic and political woes and arriving by boat in Florida.

    The Coast Guard tries to interdict Cuban migrants at sea and return them. Since the U.S. government’s new fiscal year began Oct. 1, about 4,200 have been stopped at sea — or about 43 a day. That was up from 17 per day in the previous fiscal year and just two per day during the 2020-21 fiscal year.

    But an unknown number have made it to land and will likely get to stay.

    “I would prefer to die to reach my dream and help my family. The situation in Cuba is not very good,” Jeiler del Toro Diaz told The Miami Herald shortly after coming ashore Tuesday in Key Largo.

    The Department of Homeland Security, which oversees U.S. Customs and Border Protection, said it would be issuing a statement Wednesday, but had not yet done so.

    Dry Tortugas National Park, a group of seven islands 70 miles (110 kilometers) west of Key West, remained closed to visitors Wednesday as the U.S. evacuated migrants who came ashore there earlier in the week. Normally, about 255 tourists a day arrive by boat and seaplane to tour the islands and Fort Jefferson, which was built 160 years ago. Officials did not know when it would reopen.

    In Marathon, some 45 miles (72 kilometers) northeast of Key West, about two dozen migrants were being held in a fenced-in area outside a Customs and Border Protection station where tents had been erected to provide shade. When Associated Press journalists tried to speak with the migrants through the fence, Border Patrol employees told them to leave.

    Ramón Raul Sanchez with the Cuban-American group Movimiento Democracia went to the Keys to check on the situation. He told the AP that he met a group of 22 Cubans who had just arrived. They were standing along the main road, waiting for U.S. authorities to pick them up. Sanchez and Keys officials said the Biden administration needs a more coordinated response.

    “There is a migration and humanitarian crisis, and it is necessary for the president to respond by helping local authorities,” Sanchez said.

    Cubans are willing to take the risk because those who make it to U.S. soil almost always get to stay, even if their legal status is murky. They also arrive by land, flying to Nicaragua, then traveling north through Honduras and Guatemala into Mexico. In the 2021-22 fiscal year, 220,000 Cubans were stopped at the U.S.-Mexican border, almost six times as many as the previous year.

    Callan Garcia, a Florida immigration attorney, said most Cubans who reach U.S. soil tell Border Patrol agents they can't find adequate work at home. They are then flagged “expedited for removal" as having entered the country illegally. But that does not mean the actually will be removed quickly — or at all.

    Because the U.S. and Cuba do not have formal diplomatic relations, the American government has no way to repatriate them. Cubans are released but given an order that requires them to contact federal immigration authorities periodically to confirm their address and status. They are allowed to get work permits, driver’s licenses and Social Security numbers, but cannot apply for permanent residency or citizenship.

    Garcia said that can last for the rest of their lives; some Cubans who came in the 1980 Mariel boatlift still are designated “expedited for removal."

    “They're just sort of here with a floating order for removal that can't be executed,” Garcia said.

    A small percentage of Cuban immigrants tell Border Patrol agents they are fleeing political persecution and are “paroled," Garcia said. Under the 1966 Cuban Adjustment Act, they are released until they can appear before an immigration judge to make their case. If approved, they can receive permanent residency and later apply for citizenship.

    On the other hand, Haitian immigrants almost always get sent back, even though political persecution and violence is rife there, along with severe economic hardship.

    “That inconsistency has something that immigrant rights advocates have always pointed to,” Garcia said.

    ___

    Spencer reported from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. AP reporter Gisela Salomon in Miami contributed to this report.


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
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  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,377
    ohhhh its just crossing at the southern border ......


     
    Biden toughens border, offers legal path for 30,000 a month
    By COLLEEN LONG, ZEKE MILLER and ELLIOT SPAGAT
    2 hours ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Thursday the U.S. would immediately begin turning away Cubans, Haitians and Nicaraguans who cross the border from Mexico illegally, his boldest move yet to confront the arrivals of migrants that have spiraled since he took office two years ago.

    The new rules expand on an existing effort to stop Venezuelans attempting to enter the U.S., which began in October and led to a dramatic drop in Venezuelans coming to the southern border. Together, they represent a major change to immigration rules that will stand even if the Supreme Court ends a Trump-era public health law that allows U.S. authorities to turn away asylum-seekers.

    “Do not, do not just show up at the border,” Biden said as he announced the changes, even as he acknowledged the hardships that lead many families to make the dangerous journey north.

    “Stay where you are and apply legally from there,” he advised.

    Biden made the announcement just days before a planned visit to El Paso, Texas, on Sunday for his first trip to the southern border as president. From there, he will travel on to Mexico City to meet with North American leaders on Monday and Tuesday.

    Homeland Security officials said they would begin denying asylum to those who circumvent legal pathways and do not first ask for asylum in the country they traveled through en route to the U.S.

    Instead, the U.S. will accept 30,000 people per month from the four nations for two years and offer the ability to work legally, as long as they come legally, have eligible sponsors and pass vetting and background checks. Border crossings by migrants from those four nations have risen most sharply, with no easy way to quickly return them to their home countries.

    “This new process is orderly,” Biden said. “It’s safe and humane, and it works.”

    The move, while not unexpected, drew swift criticism from asylum and immigration advocates, who have had a rocky relationship with the president.

    “President Biden correctly recognized today that seeking asylum is a legal right and spoke sympathetically about people fleeing persecution," said Jonathan Blazer, the American Civil Liberties Union’s director of border strategies. “But the plan he announced further ties his administration to the poisonous anti-immigrant policies of the Trump era instead of restoring fair access to asylum protections.”

    The Biden administration says it will immediately begin turning away Cubans, Haitians and Nicaraguans who cross the U.S.-Mexico border illegally, a major expansion of an existing effort to stop Venezuelans attempting to enter the US. (Jan. 5)

    Even with the health law restrictions in place, the president has seen the numbers of migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border rise dramatically during his two years in office; there were more than 2.38 million stops during the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, the first time the number topped 2 million. The administration has struggled to clamp down on crossings, reluctant to take hard-line measures that would resemble those of the Trump administration.

    That’s resulted in relentless criticism from Republicans who say the Democratic president is ineffective on border security, and the newly minted Republican House majority has promised congressional investigations on the matter.

    The new policy could result in 360,000 people from these four nations lawfully entering the U.S. in a year, a huge number. But far more people from those countries have been attempting to cross into the U.S. on foot, by boat or swimming; migrants from those four countries were stopped 82,286 times in November alone.

    Enyer Valbuena, a Venezuelan who was living in Tijuana, Mexico, after crossing the border illegally, said Thursday’s announcement came as no surprise but a blow nonetheless.

    “This was coming. It’s getting more difficult all the time,” he said by text message.

    Some Venezuelans waiting on Mexico’s border with the U.S. have been talking among themselves if Canada is an option, Valbuena said. He had been waiting for the outcome of the pandemic-related asylum ban before trying to enter the U.S. again and is seeking asylum in Mexico, which offers a much better future than Venezuela.

    “If it becomes more difficult (to reach the U.S.), the best path is to get papers in Mexico,” said Valbuena, who currently works at a Tijuana factory.

    Mexico has agreed to accept up to 30,000 migrants each month from the four countries who attempt to walk or swim across the U.S.-Mexico border and are turned back. Normally, these migrants would be returned to their country of origin, but the U.S. can not easily send back people from those four countries for a variety of reasons that include relations with the governments there.

    Anyone coming to the U.S. is allowed to claim asylum, regardless of how they crossed the border, and migrants seeking a better life in the U.S. often pay smugglers the equivalent of thousands of dollars to deliver them across the dangerous Darien Gap.

    But the requirements for granting asylum are narrow, and only about 30% of applications are granted. That has created a system in which migrants try to cross between ports of entry and are allowed into the U.S. to wait out their cases. But there is a 2 million-case immigration court backlog, so cases often are not heard for years.

    The only lasting way to change the system is through Congress, but a bipartisan congressional effort on new immigration laws failed shortly before Republicans took the House majority.

    “The actions we’re announcing will make things better, but will not fix the border problem completely," Biden said, in pressing lawmakers to act.

    Under then-President Donald Trump, the U.S. required asylum seekers to wait across the border in Mexico. But clogs in the immigration system created long delays, leading to fetid, dangerous camps over the border where migrants were forced to wait. That system was ended under Biden, and the migrants who are returned to Mexico under the new rules will not be eligible for asylum.

    Biden will also triple the number of refugees accepted to the U.S. from the Western Hemisphere, to 20,000 from Latin America and Caribbean, over the next two years. Refugees and asylum-seekers have to meet the same criteria to be allowed into the country, but they arrive through different means.

    Border officials are also creating an online appointment portal to help reduce wait times at U.S. ports of entry for those coming legally. It will allow people to set up an appointment to come and ask to be allowed into the country.

    At the U.S.-Mexico border, migrants have been denied a chance to seek asylum 2.5 million times since March 2020 under the Title 42 restrictions, introduced as an emergency health measure by Trump to prevent the spread of COVID-19. But there always has been criticism that the restrictions were used as a pretext by the Republican to seal off the border.

    Biden moved to end the Title 42 restrictions, and Republicans sued to keep them. The U.S. Supreme Court has kept the rules in place for now. White House officials say they still believe the restrictions should end, but they maintain they can continue to turn away migrants under immigration law.

    The four nationalities that Biden addressed Thursday now make up the majority of those crossing the border illegally. Cubans, who are leaving the island nation in their largest numbers in six decades, were stopped 34,675 times at the U.S. border with Mexico in November, up 21% from October. Nicaraguans, a large reason why El Paso has become the busiest corridor for illegal crossings, were stopped 34,209 times in November, up 65% from October.

    But Venezuelans were seen far less at the border after Mexico agreed on Oct. 12 to begin accepting those expelled from the United States. They were stopped 7,931 times, down 64% from October.

    Venezuelans have said the changes have been difficult, particularly with finding a sponsor who has the financial resources to demonstrate the ability to support them. And even if they find a sponsor, sometimes they delay their arrival because they don’t have the economic resources to pay for the flight to the U.S. For some, the Venezuelan passport that they need has expired, and they cannot afford to pay for the renewal.

    ___

    Spagat reported from San Diego. Associated Press writers Rebecca Santana in Washington and Gisela Salomon in Miami contributed to this report.


    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 35,302
    mickeyrat said:
    ohhhh its just crossing at the southern border ......


     
    Biden toughens border, offers legal path for 30,000 a month
    By COLLEEN LONG, ZEKE MILLER and ELLIOT SPAGAT
    2 hours ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Thursday the U.S. would immediately begin turning away Cubans, Haitians and Nicaraguans who cross the border from Mexico illegally, his boldest move yet to confront the arrivals of migrants that have spiraled since he took office two years ago.

    The new rules expand on an existing effort to stop Venezuelans attempting to enter the U.S., which began in October and led to a dramatic drop in Venezuelans coming to the southern border. Together, they represent a major change to immigration rules that will stand even if the Supreme Court ends a Trump-era public health law that allows U.S. authorities to turn away asylum-seekers.

    “Do not, do not just show up at the border,” Biden said as he announced the changes, even as he acknowledged the hardships that lead many families to make the dangerous journey north.

    “Stay where you are and apply legally from there,” he advised.

    Biden made the announcement just days before a planned visit to El Paso, Texas, on Sunday for his first trip to the southern border as president. From there, he will travel on to Mexico City to meet with North American leaders on Monday and Tuesday.

    Homeland Security officials said they would begin denying asylum to those who circumvent legal pathways and do not first ask for asylum in the country they traveled through en route to the U.S.

    Instead, the U.S. will accept 30,000 people per month from the four nations for two years and offer the ability to work legally, as long as they come legally, have eligible sponsors and pass vetting and background checks. Border crossings by migrants from those four nations have risen most sharply, with no easy way to quickly return them to their home countries.

    “This new process is orderly,” Biden said. “It’s safe and humane, and it works.”

    The move, while not unexpected, drew swift criticism from asylum and immigration advocates, who have had a rocky relationship with the president.

    “President Biden correctly recognized today that seeking asylum is a legal right and spoke sympathetically about people fleeing persecution," said Jonathan Blazer, the American Civil Liberties Union’s director of border strategies. “But the plan he announced further ties his administration to the poisonous anti-immigrant policies of the Trump era instead of restoring fair access to asylum protections.”

    The Biden administration says it will immediately begin turning away Cubans, Haitians and Nicaraguans who cross the U.S.-Mexico border illegally, a major expansion of an existing effort to stop Venezuelans attempting to enter the US. (Jan. 5)

    Even with the health law restrictions in place, the president has seen the numbers of migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border rise dramatically during his two years in office; there were more than 2.38 million stops during the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, the first time the number topped 2 million. The administration has struggled to clamp down on crossings, reluctant to take hard-line measures that would resemble those of the Trump administration.

    That’s resulted in relentless criticism from Republicans who say the Democratic president is ineffective on border security, and the newly minted Republican House majority has promised congressional investigations on the matter.

    The new policy could result in 360,000 people from these four nations lawfully entering the U.S. in a year, a huge number. But far more people from those countries have been attempting to cross into the U.S. on foot, by boat or swimming; migrants from those four countries were stopped 82,286 times in November alone.

    Enyer Valbuena, a Venezuelan who was living in Tijuana, Mexico, after crossing the border illegally, said Thursday’s announcement came as no surprise but a blow nonetheless.

    “This was coming. It’s getting more difficult all the time,” he said by text message.

    Some Venezuelans waiting on Mexico’s border with the U.S. have been talking among themselves if Canada is an option, Valbuena said. He had been waiting for the outcome of the pandemic-related asylum ban before trying to enter the U.S. again and is seeking asylum in Mexico, which offers a much better future than Venezuela.

    “If it becomes more difficult (to reach the U.S.), the best path is to get papers in Mexico,” said Valbuena, who currently works at a Tijuana factory.

    Mexico has agreed to accept up to 30,000 migrants each month from the four countries who attempt to walk or swim across the U.S.-Mexico border and are turned back. Normally, these migrants would be returned to their country of origin, but the U.S. can not easily send back people from those four countries for a variety of reasons that include relations with the governments there.

    Anyone coming to the U.S. is allowed to claim asylum, regardless of how they crossed the border, and migrants seeking a better life in the U.S. often pay smugglers the equivalent of thousands of dollars to deliver them across the dangerous Darien Gap.

    But the requirements for granting asylum are narrow, and only about 30% of applications are granted. That has created a system in which migrants try to cross between ports of entry and are allowed into the U.S. to wait out their cases. But there is a 2 million-case immigration court backlog, so cases often are not heard for years.

    The only lasting way to change the system is through Congress, but a bipartisan congressional effort on new immigration laws failed shortly before Republicans took the House majority.

    “The actions we’re announcing will make things better, but will not fix the border problem completely," Biden said, in pressing lawmakers to act.

    Under then-President Donald Trump, the U.S. required asylum seekers to wait across the border in Mexico. But clogs in the immigration system created long delays, leading to fetid, dangerous camps over the border where migrants were forced to wait. That system was ended under Biden, and the migrants who are returned to Mexico under the new rules will not be eligible for asylum.

    Biden will also triple the number of refugees accepted to the U.S. from the Western Hemisphere, to 20,000 from Latin America and Caribbean, over the next two years. Refugees and asylum-seekers have to meet the same criteria to be allowed into the country, but they arrive through different means.

    Border officials are also creating an online appointment portal to help reduce wait times at U.S. ports of entry for those coming legally. It will allow people to set up an appointment to come and ask to be allowed into the country.

    At the U.S.-Mexico border, migrants have been denied a chance to seek asylum 2.5 million times since March 2020 under the Title 42 restrictions, introduced as an emergency health measure by Trump to prevent the spread of COVID-19. But there always has been criticism that the restrictions were used as a pretext by the Republican to seal off the border.

    Biden moved to end the Title 42 restrictions, and Republicans sued to keep them. The U.S. Supreme Court has kept the rules in place for now. White House officials say they still believe the restrictions should end, but they maintain they can continue to turn away migrants under immigration law.

    The four nationalities that Biden addressed Thursday now make up the majority of those crossing the border illegally. Cubans, who are leaving the island nation in their largest numbers in six decades, were stopped 34,675 times at the U.S. border with Mexico in November, up 21% from October. Nicaraguans, a large reason why El Paso has become the busiest corridor for illegal crossings, were stopped 34,209 times in November, up 65% from October.

    But Venezuelans were seen far less at the border after Mexico agreed on Oct. 12 to begin accepting those expelled from the United States. They were stopped 7,931 times, down 64% from October.

    Venezuelans have said the changes have been difficult, particularly with finding a sponsor who has the financial resources to demonstrate the ability to support them. And even if they find a sponsor, sometimes they delay their arrival because they don’t have the economic resources to pay for the flight to the U.S. For some, the Venezuelan passport that they need has expired, and they cannot afford to pay for the renewal.

    ___

    Spagat reported from San Diego. Associated Press writers Rebecca Santana in Washington and Gisela Salomon in Miami contributed to this report.


    So now that we have agreed to let people in let's see if the borders get even more inundated in knowing that they actually have a chance to get in.

    They agreed to let in 360,000 a year for 2 years.  That is 720,000 for those 2 years.  They still have a 2,000,000 backlog?
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 27,377
    Biden just outmaneuvered MAGA Republicans — and they barely noticed  https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2023/01/17/biden-trump-maga-undocumented-workers/ 

      Opinion | Biden just outmaneuvered MAGA Republicans — and they barely noticed
    Opinion by Greg Sargent
    January 17, 2023 at 15:33 ET
    If President Biden rolls out a major new pro-immigrant policy, and MAGA Republicans don’t make any noise about it, did the announcement happen at all?
    Why, yes, it did. Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas unveiled an initiative on Friday that would extend more protection against deportation to undocumented immigrants who report labor rights violations by employers.
    This is a big move by the administration, one long sought by immigration advocates. Biden’s immigration record is decidedly mixed, but this would address a serious problem: Undocumented migrant workers often fear reporting workplace violations — ones they were victims of or just witnessed — because it could lead to their deportation.
    Now they will have improved access to a legal process that can defer their deportations for two years and potentially extend them work permits. The hope: To encourage them not just to report unsafe or exploitative working conditions, but also to cooperate with ongoing Labor Department investigations, improving working standards for all workers.
    So far, this policy has sparked relatively little outrage among MAGA Republicans and right-wing media. Yet it has hallmarks that typically anger the right. It would allow some migrants here unlawfully to remain in the U.S. interior, based on the use of prosecutorial discretion to defer deportations, something the right has long raged against.
    What explains the quiet response? It might be that this change creates an awkward political situation for the anti-immigrant right, one that says a good deal about its ideology and its limitations.
    Here’s why: This policy attempts to align the interests of undocumented workers with those of native-born workers. For some on the right, casting those interests as irrevocably in conflict has been essential to their project. This zero-sum agitprop packages the nativist impulse to drastically limit immigration as all about protecting the American worker.
    But this new move undermines that rhetoric. In describing the shift, Mayorkas took pains to note that it will facilitate holding “exploitative employers” accountable for taking advantage of vulnerable workers who are in the U.S. lawfully. Mayorkas added: “Employers who play by the rules are disadvantaged by those who don’t.”
    In other words, allowing undocumented migrants to speak out about exploitative labor violations without fear of retribution helps aboveboard employers and U.S. workers, too.
    Chris Newman, general counsel of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, has long argued this would help resolve perceived conflicts between migrants and U.S. workers. “It removes the pernicious incentive for predatory employers to hire undocumented immigrants with the intent to abuse them,” Newman told me.
    “All workers, whether documented or undocumented, have an interest in being compensated, in not being abused, in being able to blow the whistle,” immigration lawyer David Leopold added. When the undocumented are exploited, Leopold said, “that brings down the wages and working conditions of U.S. workers as well.”
    Republicans might yet strongly oppose this policy. They might argue it’s an abuse of executive power, or that it will harm mom-and-pop small-business owners. This is how Republicans attack Biden’s effort to expand IRS crackdowns on wealthy tax cheats, as The Post’s Catherine Rampell details: By pretending it’s about protecting small businesses.

    continues.....

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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 35,302
    Chinas growth is negative.  See if they will take some people in.
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 26,288
    mickeyrat said:
    So Cubans are ok. but others from the broader region are not. fleeing for the same or similar reasons.



     
    Cuban migrants flow into Florida Keys, overwhelm officials
    By CODY JACKSON and TERRY SPENCER
    Today

    MARATHON, Fla. (AP) — More than 500 Cuban immigrants have come ashore in the Florida Keys since the weekend, the latest in a large and increasing number who are fleeing the communist island and stretching thin U.S. border agencies both on land and at sea.

    It is a dangerous 100-mile (160-kilometer) trip in often rickety boats — unknown thousands having perished over the years — but more Cubans are taking the risk amid deepening and compounding political and economic crises at home. A smaller number of Haitians are also fleeing their country’s economic and political woes and arriving by boat in Florida.

    The Coast Guard tries to interdict Cuban migrants at sea and return them. Since the U.S. government’s new fiscal year began Oct. 1, about 4,200 have been stopped at sea — or about 43 a day. That was up from 17 per day in the previous fiscal year and just two per day during the 2020-21 fiscal year.

    But an unknown number have made it to land and will likely get to stay.

    “I would prefer to die to reach my dream and help my family. The situation in Cuba is not very good,” Jeiler del Toro Diaz told The Miami Herald shortly after coming ashore Tuesday in Key Largo.

    The Department of Homeland Security, which oversees U.S. Customs and Border Protection, said it would be issuing a statement Wednesday, but had not yet done so.

    Dry Tortugas National Park, a group of seven islands 70 miles (110 kilometers) west of Key West, remained closed to visitors Wednesday as the U.S. evacuated migrants who came ashore there earlier in the week. Normally, about 255 tourists a day arrive by boat and seaplane to tour the islands and Fort Jefferson, which was built 160 years ago. Officials did not know when it would reopen.

    In Marathon, some 45 miles (72 kilometers) northeast of Key West, about two dozen migrants were being held in a fenced-in area outside a Customs and Border Protection station where tents had been erected to provide shade. When Associated Press journalists tried to speak with the migrants through the fence, Border Patrol employees told them to leave.

    Ramón Raul Sanchez with the Cuban-American group Movimiento Democracia went to the Keys to check on the situation. He told the AP that he met a group of 22 Cubans who had just arrived. They were standing along the main road, waiting for U.S. authorities to pick them up. Sanchez and Keys officials said the Biden administration needs a more coordinated response.

    “There is a migration and humanitarian crisis, and it is necessary for the president to respond by helping local authorities,” Sanchez said.

    Cubans are willing to take the risk because those who make it to U.S. soil almost always get to stay, even if their legal status is murky. They also arrive by land, flying to Nicaragua, then traveling north through Honduras and Guatemala into Mexico. In the 2021-22 fiscal year, 220,000 Cubans were stopped at the U.S.-Mexican border, almost six times as many as the previous year.

    Callan Garcia, a Florida immigration attorney, said most Cubans who reach U.S. soil tell Border Patrol agents they can't find adequate work at home. They are then flagged “expedited for removal" as having entered the country illegally. But that does not mean the actually will be removed quickly — or at all.

    Because the U.S. and Cuba do not have formal diplomatic relations, the American government has no way to repatriate them. Cubans are released but given an order that requires them to contact federal immigration authorities periodically to confirm their address and status. They are allowed to get work permits, driver’s licenses and Social Security numbers, but cannot apply for permanent residency or citizenship.

    Garcia said that can last for the rest of their lives; some Cubans who came in the 1980 Mariel boatlift still are designated “expedited for removal."

    “They're just sort of here with a floating order for removal that can't be executed,” Garcia said.

    A small percentage of Cuban immigrants tell Border Patrol agents they are fleeing political persecution and are “paroled," Garcia said. Under the 1966 Cuban Adjustment Act, they are released until they can appear before an immigration judge to make their case. If approved, they can receive permanent residency and later apply for citizenship.

    On the other hand, Haitian immigrants almost always get sent back, even though political persecution and violence is rife there, along with severe economic hardship.

    “That inconsistency has something that immigrant rights advocates have always pointed to,” Garcia said.

    ___

    Spencer reported from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. AP reporter Gisela Salomon in Miami contributed to this report.


    Off course Cubans get here by boat way harder then walking 2000miles and they vote Republican! 
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 26,288
    Send them all to marliago to be with the orange savior he will help them all! 
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • Halifax2TheMaxHalifax2TheMax Posts: 32,674
    Deathsantis and Abbot & Costello winning again. Gift article.

    https://wapo.st/3QY7GlE
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