See something, say something... unless...

we’ve built this social idea of see something, say something.  But apparently if you are wrong you end up front lines of the news.  How do we manage this idea of anything that seems suspicious that you should report vs you might be wrong and vilified?
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Comments

  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,156
    There's nothing suspicious about people of colour being places and doing things.
    It's that fucking simple, and the bastards that have been vilified have deserved it.
    If you are afraid of treading that line, what does that say?  I don't know, but nothing good is my guess.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • josevolutionjosevolution Posts: 19,190
    we’ve built this social idea of see something, say something.  But apparently if you are wrong you end up front lines of the news.  How do we manage this idea of anything that seems suspicious that you should report vs you might be wrong and vilified?
    It’s called common sense ! 
    jesus greets me looks just like me ....
  • unsungunsung Posts: 9,100
    Snitches.
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 4,655
    unsung said:
    Snitches.
    ...get stitches. right? Is that really what you think of people who "Say Something"?
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 2,663
    rgambs said:
    There's nothing suspicious about people of colour being places and doing things.
    It's that fucking simple, and the bastards that have been vilified have deserved it.
    If you are afraid of treading that line, what does that say?  I don't know, but nothing good is my guess.
    But in the San Bernardino mass shooting 2 or 3 years ago, didn't several neighbors come forward after the shooting and admit they thought it was suspicious, but were afraid to say anything. Fearing if they were wrong they'd be sued and called racist.
    I think there is some truth to the OP. Sometimes it is profiling, but sometimes it is suspicious behavior that turns out to be innocent, either way you'll be called racist (assuming they aren't white)..
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 4,655
    we’ve built this social idea of see something, say something.  But apparently if you are wrong you end up front lines of the news.  How do we manage this idea of anything that seems suspicious that you should report vs you might be wrong and vilified?
    Is there a specific incident you are referring to? I guess if what you "saw"  was a surface level observation based in implicit or unconscious bias with no other relevant threat or criminal behavior, then you can probably expect to get some backlash. Unfortunately there are plenty of xenophobic racists out there who do exactly that. I can't even begin to imagine how many of these types of BS calls law enforcement has to deal with on a daily basis. There are a lot of ignorant people out there who don't even know they carry this bias with them and how it impacts others.
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,078
    mace1229 said:
    rgambs said:
    There's nothing suspicious about people of colour being places and doing things.
    It's that fucking simple, and the bastards that have been vilified have deserved it.
    If you are afraid of treading that line, what does that say?  I don't know, but nothing good is my guess.
    But in the San Bernardino mass shooting 2 or 3 years ago, didn't several neighbors come forward after the shooting and admit they thought it was suspicious, but were afraid to say anything. Fearing if they were wrong they'd be sued and called racist.
    I think there is some truth to the OP. Sometimes it is profiling, but sometimes it is suspicious behavior that turns out to be innocent, either way you'll be called racist (assuming they aren't white)..
    people barbequeing is not suspicious behaviour. 
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 2,663
    mace1229 said:
    rgambs said:
    There's nothing suspicious about people of colour being places and doing things.
    It's that fucking simple, and the bastards that have been vilified have deserved it.
    If you are afraid of treading that line, what does that say?  I don't know, but nothing good is my guess.
    But in the San Bernardino mass shooting 2 or 3 years ago, didn't several neighbors come forward after the shooting and admit they thought it was suspicious, but were afraid to say anything. Fearing if they were wrong they'd be sued and called racist.
    I think there is some truth to the OP. Sometimes it is profiling, but sometimes it is suspicious behavior that turns out to be innocent, either way you'll be called racist (assuming they aren't white)..
    people barbequeing is not suspicious behaviour. 
    Correct. I don't think anyone was talking about someone back who was BBQing being reported through.
    This is the story I was referring to. Neighbors of those mass shooters were very suspicious, but were afraid to say anything.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3344736/Neighbors-Saudi-husband-wife-San-Bernardino-shooters-noticed-acting-suspiciously-did-NOT-report-fear-racial-profiling.html

    And remember that kid who brought a homemade clock to school that looked like a bomb? The school was sued for that. I have zero doubt in my mind if it was a bomb and no one called, the school would have faced 100 lawsuits for not calling. But if it looks like a bomb and you're wrong, you're racist and get sued.
  • tbergstbergs Posts: 4,655
    mace1229 said:
    rgambs said:
    There's nothing suspicious about people of colour being places and doing things.
    It's that fucking simple, and the bastards that have been vilified have deserved it.
    If you are afraid of treading that line, what does that say?  I don't know, but nothing good is my guess.
    But in the San Bernardino mass shooting 2 or 3 years ago, didn't several neighbors come forward after the shooting and admit they thought it was suspicious, but were afraid to say anything. Fearing if they were wrong they'd be sued and called racist.
    I think there is some truth to the OP. Sometimes it is profiling, but sometimes it is suspicious behavior that turns out to be innocent, either way you'll be called racist (assuming they aren't white)..
    The term suspicious behavior/person is completely based on people's ability to profile. Their whole view point is based on what they have been exposed to in person, read, seen on TV or heard from other people. Beyond someone in a ski mask holding a gun, the majority of people are profiling when they report these types of incidents because there isn't a universal agreement about what is suspicious in all circumstances. Based on my life experiences, I find a lot more behavior to be sketchy than my wife does. That doesn't mean I actually think that every time I see something that I say something because you have to take it in to context.   
    It's a hopeless situation...
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 2,663
    tbergs said:
    mace1229 said:
    rgambs said:
    There's nothing suspicious about people of colour being places and doing things.
    It's that fucking simple, and the bastards that have been vilified have deserved it.
    If you are afraid of treading that line, what does that say?  I don't know, but nothing good is my guess.
    But in the San Bernardino mass shooting 2 or 3 years ago, didn't several neighbors come forward after the shooting and admit they thought it was suspicious, but were afraid to say anything. Fearing if they were wrong they'd be sued and called racist.
    I think there is some truth to the OP. Sometimes it is profiling, but sometimes it is suspicious behavior that turns out to be innocent, either way you'll be called racist (assuming they aren't white)..
    The term suspicious behavior/person is completely based on people's ability to profile. Their whole view point is based on what they have been exposed to in person, read, seen on TV or heard from other people. Beyond someone in a ski mask holding a gun, the majority of people are profiling when they report these types of incidents because there isn't a universal agreement about what is suspicious in all circumstances. Based on my life experiences, I find a lot more behavior to be sketchy than my wife does. That doesn't mean I actually think that every time I see something that I say something because you have to take it in to context.   
    Some behaviours are pretty universal;y accepted as suspicious. When you see a lot of people coming and going at odd hours of the night, something illegal is going down in that house. 
    The suspicious behavior not reported was working in the garage during all hours of the night, and an unusually large number of packages being delivered. Unless you're a vampire and have no respect for your neighbors, there is no good reason to be working in the garage throughout the night.
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,078
    mace1229 said:
    mace1229 said:
    rgambs said:
    There's nothing suspicious about people of colour being places and doing things.
    It's that fucking simple, and the bastards that have been vilified have deserved it.
    If you are afraid of treading that line, what does that say?  I don't know, but nothing good is my guess.
    But in the San Bernardino mass shooting 2 or 3 years ago, didn't several neighbors come forward after the shooting and admit they thought it was suspicious, but were afraid to say anything. Fearing if they were wrong they'd be sued and called racist.
    I think there is some truth to the OP. Sometimes it is profiling, but sometimes it is suspicious behavior that turns out to be innocent, either way you'll be called racist (assuming they aren't white)..
    people barbequeing is not suspicious behaviour. 
    Correct. I don't think anyone was talking about someone back who was BBQing being reported through.
    This is the story I was referring to. Neighbors of those mass shooters were very suspicious, but were afraid to say anything.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3344736/Neighbors-Saudi-husband-wife-San-Bernardino-shooters-noticed-acting-suspiciously-did-NOT-report-fear-racial-profiling.html

    And remember that kid who brought a homemade clock to school that looked like a bomb? The school was sued for that. I have zero doubt in my mind if it was a bomb and no one called, the school would have faced 100 lawsuits for not calling. But if it looks like a bomb and you're wrong, you're racist and get sued.
    I gathered the OP was referencing the BBQ incident. 

    anything that is credible and not just "oh my god he's brown and wearing a head scarf so he's a terrorist" should be reported. just use common sense and quit with the hysteria, people. 

    full disclosure: I was on the bus the other day. a guy was looking for his cell phone. He was not from canada. someone then offered to call his phone so they could trace it wherever it was on the bus. Then he went to the front of the bus leaving his backpack on his seat at the back of the bus. 

    my mind went there. 

    then I realized how unlikely and preposterous it was that I was thinking what I was thinking. I had to actually think to myself "would this be on my mind if this guy was white?". I can honestly say probably not. I was profiling. and I was ashamed of myself. part of it, honestly, is my anxiety issue. My mind goes to those places often where "normal" people's dont, but still, the idea is the same. I was profling and it was wrong. 

    the guy just innocently misplaced his cell phone. I can't imagine the pain he could have been caused had I or someone else reported him and acting suspiciously. which he really wasn't. 
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 2,663
    I'm unaware of a BBQ incident. What happened?
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 2,663
    Never heard that story.
    I don't think that's what the OP was referencing, maybe he was?
    Because that wasn't a case of "See something say something."
    Sounds like she was just good old fashioned racist and didn't want a large group of black people at the park. I mean her 911 complaint was that they were using charcoal, which was against park policy. But it was a well organized event with some legit looking bbq.
  • rgambsrgambs Posts: 11,156
    mace1229 said:
    Never heard that story.
    I don't think that's what the OP was referencing, maybe he was?
    Because that wasn't a case of "See something say something."
    Sounds like she was just good old fashioned racist and didn't want a large group of black people at the park. I mean her 911 complaint was that they were using charcoal, which was against park policy. But it was a well organized event with some legit looking bbq.
    The BBQ story has been widely lambasted, but across social media there have been several incidents that went viral recently.
    In the past few weeks, these events have gone viral...a white female student called the cops on a black female student napping in the common area of the dorm the both lived in at Yale, 2 native American boys had the cops called on them by a white person while walking around on a college tour in very white Ft Collins Co, Bob Marley's granddaughter had the cops called on her because she was at an AirBnB in a white suburb, the 2 black men had the cops called at a Starbucks, a group of black women had the cops called because they were golfing "suspiciously slow", and there's another one that's slipping my mind right now.
    One or more of these incidents surely sparked this thread.
    Monkey Driven, Call this Living?
  • F Me In The BrainF Me In The Brain this knows everybody from other commetsPosts: 13,520
    Holy shit that BBQ line looks amazing. 
    The love he receives is the love that is saved
  • mace1229mace1229 Posts: 2,663
    rgambs said:
    mace1229 said:
    Never heard that story.
    I don't think that's what the OP was referencing, maybe he was?
    Because that wasn't a case of "See something say something."
    Sounds like she was just good old fashioned racist and didn't want a large group of black people at the park. I mean her 911 complaint was that they were using charcoal, which was against park policy. But it was a well organized event with some legit looking bbq.
    The BBQ story has been widely lambasted, but across social media there have been several incidents that went viral recently.
    In the past few weeks, these events have gone viral...a white female student called the cops on a black female student napping in the common area of the dorm the both lived in at Yale, 2 native American boys had the cops called on them by a white person while walking around on a college tour in very white Ft Collins Co, Bob Marley's granddaughter had the cops called on her because she was at an AirBnB in a white suburb, the 2 black men had the cops called at a Starbucks, a group of black women had the cops called because they were golfing "suspiciously slow", and there's another one that's slipping my mind right now.
    One or more of these incidents surely sparked this thread.
    I'm familiar with all those except the BBQ one. I have a range of opinions on those, some I think look very bad, and some I think may have been just an over-reaction, but not necessarily racially motivated. 
  • hedonisthedonist standing on the edge of foreverPosts: 19,164
    we’ve built this social idea of see something, say something.  But apparently if you are wrong you end up front lines of the news.  How do we manage this idea of anything that seems suspicious that you should report vs you might be wrong and vilified?
    It’s called common sense ! 
    This right here.

    And F Me, ha!
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,542
    hedonist said:
    we’ve built this social idea of see something, say something.  But apparently if you are wrong you end up front lines of the news.  How do we manage this idea of anything that seems suspicious that you should report vs you might be wrong and vilified?
    It’s called common sense ! 
    This right here.

    And F Me, ha!
    I agree as well-- common sense!
    "Something comes along and you have to jump on and do it.  You can't stop until it's done."
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  • mcgruff10mcgruff10 New JerseyPosts: 15,708
    mace1229 said:
    rgambs said:
    There's nothing suspicious about people of colour being places and doing things.
    It's that fucking simple, and the bastards that have been vilified have deserved it.
    If you are afraid of treading that line, what does that say?  I don't know, but nothing good is my guess.
    But in the San Bernardino mass shooting 2 or 3 years ago, didn't several neighbors come forward after the shooting and admit they thought it was suspicious, but were afraid to say anything. Fearing if they were wrong they'd be sued and called racist.
    I think there is some truth to the OP. Sometimes it is profiling, but sometimes it is suspicious behavior that turns out to be innocent, either way you'll be called racist (assuming they aren't white)..
    people barbequeing is not suspicious behaviour. 
    Agreed. Some people really suck. 
    I'll ride the wave where it takes me......
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 3,948
    Instead of people being afraid to say something, my worry is how much is missed because people are distracting by their cell phones pretty much 95% of their day.
    "At least I'm housebroken"
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 5,200
    PJPOWER said:
    Instead of people being afraid to say something, my worry is how much is smissed because people are distracting by their cell phones pretty much 95% of their day.
    Wait
    What?
    Sorry I was liking  a really cute cat video  on facebook
  • PJPOWERPJPOWER In Yo FacePosts: 3,948
    PJPOWER said:
    Instead of people being afraid to say something, my worry is how much is smissed because people are distracting by their cell phones pretty much 95% of their day.
    Wait
    What?
    Sorry I was liking  a really cute cat video  on facebook
    Exactly, lol
    "At least I'm housebroken"
  • pjhawkspjhawks Posts: 8,715
    I would not have called the police for it but the BBQ incident they were doing something they weren't supposed to be doing. I have no problem with saying something if i see something. better to be safe than sorry...unless...
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,078
    pjhawks said:
    I would not have called the police for it but the BBQ incident they were doing something they weren't supposed to be doing. I have no problem with saying something if i see something. better to be safe than sorry...unless...
    yes, but would she have called the cops if it was a bunch of cardigan-wearing blonde people? who knows. 
  • pjhawkspjhawks Posts: 8,715
    pjhawks said:
    I would not have called the police for it but the BBQ incident they were doing something they weren't supposed to be doing. I have no problem with saying something if i see something. better to be safe than sorry...unless...
    yes, but would she have called the cops if it was a bunch of cardigan-wearing blonde people? who knows. 
    obviously we will never know that but might be a good idea to be careful before labeling someone racist these days. not everyone who calls the police on black people are being racist.  i think that is where the tone is moving to these days.  we have to be careful not to go to far in either direction...calling too much or calling not at all.
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,078
    pjhawks said:
    pjhawks said:
    I would not have called the police for it but the BBQ incident they were doing something they weren't supposed to be doing. I have no problem with saying something if i see something. better to be safe than sorry...unless...
    yes, but would she have called the cops if it was a bunch of cardigan-wearing blonde people? who knows. 
    obviously we will never know that but might be a good idea to be careful before labeling someone racist these days. not everyone who calls the police on black people are being racist.  i think that is where the tone is moving to these days.  we have to be careful not to go to far in either direction...calling too much or calling not at all.
    I agree with you...hence the "who knows". 
  • OnWis97OnWis97 St. Paul, MNPosts: 979
    The Yale story as well.  White student calls the cops on a black woman who fell asleep in the common area of the dorm (in which she's a resident).  Apparently this is the white student's second time calling the police on someone for, I don't know, "being while black." 

    https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/09/us/yale-student-napping-black-trnd/index.html

    There are a lot of stories out there.  It's either a trend or it's simply being covered more, but it's common for white people to get nervous and call the cops when black people are around.  

    And in this case, the cops spent a lot of time with her making sure she actually lived there.  Her using the key to open the door did not convince them.  

    This is a reality being black in white-dominated places.  Someone may call the cops. And if they do, the cops may take up a lot of your time (or worse).  
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  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,231
    pjhawks said:
    pjhawks said:
    I would not have called the police for it but the BBQ incident they were doing something they weren't supposed to be doing. I have no problem with saying something if i see something. better to be safe than sorry...unless...
    yes, but would she have called the cops if it was a bunch of cardigan-wearing blonde people? who knows. 
    obviously we will never know that but might be a good idea to be careful before labeling someone racist these days. not everyone who calls the police on black people are being racist.  i think that is where the tone is moving to these days.  we have to be careful not to go to far in either direction...calling too much or calling not at all.
    Hell, even if she isn't racist, she deserves to be publicly shamed just for calling the cops about anyone using charcoal instead of propane. That's ridiculous, and at the very least I hope people learn that you don't go calling the cops for stupid shit like that. Not unless you maybe live in Mayberry or something, where the cops literally have nothing better to do.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Go BeaversGo Beavers Posts: 6,931
    Somethings become suspicious after the fact. If I was working in my garage through the night repetitively, my neighbors would say it’s annoying, not suspicious.  It’s natural to change meaning to something in hindsight so we don’t look like a dipstick. 
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