Canadian Politics Redux

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  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,060
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,298
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    I agree with you, you don't know much about this, if anything at all.
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,060
    edited February 16
    dignin said:
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    I agree with you, you don't know much about this, if anything at all.
    well then, have a wonderful day. 

    jesus fucking christ. 
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,060
    edited February 16
    dignin said:
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    I agree with you, you don't know much about this, if anything at all.
    you know what....fuck it. if you know more than me, fine. many do. i was speaking to the very real perception a lot of canadians have towards albertans. 

    you can choose to refute that respectfully. but no, once again, you choose to be a complete dick about it. again and again. 

    go fuck yourself. i'm done. 
    Post edited by HughFreakingDillon on
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,298
    dignin said:
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    I agree with you, you don't know much about this, if anything at all.
    well then, have a wonderful day. 

    jesus fucking christ. 
    Hey man, relax, I was just agreeing with you.

    1ThoughtKnown gives a well thought out response based on actual knowledge and you chime in "Hey, I don't know what I'm talking about but here's my two cents". I'm not even going to get into how BC is kneecapping a progressive government here, the first to pass real environmental legislation putting a price on carbon, all for politics. Helping to elect Jason Fucking Kenny and his band of wackjobs. If you think shits bad here, wait until they take control.

    And thanks, I am having a good day.
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,298
    dignin said:
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    I agree with you, you don't know much about this, if anything at all.
    you know what....fuck it. if you know more than me, fine. many do. i was speaking to the very real perception a lot of canadians have towards albertans. 

    you can choose to refute that respectfully. but no, once again, you choose to be a complete dick about it. again and again. 

    go fuck yourself. i'm done. 
    Nice, well done.
  • dignin said:
    dignin said:
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    I agree with you, you don't know much about this, if anything at all.
    well then, have a wonderful day. 

    jesus fucking christ. 
    Hey man, relax, I was just agreeing with you.

    1ThoughtKnown gives a well thought out response based on actual knowledge and you chime in "Hey, I don't know what I'm talking about but here's my two cents". I'm not even going to get into how BC is kneecapping a progressive government here, the first to pass real environmental legislation putting a price on carbon, all for politics. Helping to elect Jason Fucking Kenny and his band of wackjobs. If you think shits bad here, wait until they take control.

    And thanks, I am having a good day.
    BC doesn't owe Alberta anything.

    The province has a responsibility to its citizens before it has a responsibility to placating Alberta.

    If, among many things, environmental impact studies have deemed the pipeline too great a risk... then it is what it is. Alberta has oil. Great! It doesn't have an ocean though... wants it... isn't getting it... and threatens to boycott BC wine lol.

    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,298
    edited February 16
    dignin said:
    dignin said:
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    I agree with you, you don't know much about this, if anything at all.
    well then, have a wonderful day. 

    jesus fucking christ. 
    Hey man, relax, I was just agreeing with you.

    1ThoughtKnown gives a well thought out response based on actual knowledge and you chime in "Hey, I don't know what I'm talking about but here's my two cents". I'm not even going to get into how BC is kneecapping a progressive government here, the first to pass real environmental legislation putting a price on carbon, all for politics. Helping to elect Jason Fucking Kenny and his band of wackjobs. If you think shits bad here, wait until they take control.

    And thanks, I am having a good day.
    BC doesn't owe Alberta anything.

    The province has a responsibility to its citizens before it has a responsibility to placating Alberta.

    If, among many things, environmental impact studies have deemed the pipeline too great a risk... then it is what it is. Alberta has oil. Great! It doesn't have an ocean though... wants it... isn't getting it... and threatens to boycott BC wine lol.

    It does, but it also has a responsibility to the union of Canada.

    Different pipeline, point still stands.



    Also, it's not a wine boycott. 
    Post edited by dignin on
  • dignin said:
    dignin said:
    dignin said:
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    I agree with you, you don't know much about this, if anything at all.
    well then, have a wonderful day. 

    jesus fucking christ. 
    Hey man, relax, I was just agreeing with you.

    1ThoughtKnown gives a well thought out response based on actual knowledge and you chime in "Hey, I don't know what I'm talking about but here's my two cents". I'm not even going to get into how BC is kneecapping a progressive government here, the first to pass real environmental legislation putting a price on carbon, all for politics. Helping to elect Jason Fucking Kenny and his band of wackjobs. If you think shits bad here, wait until they take control.

    And thanks, I am having a good day.
    BC doesn't owe Alberta anything.

    The province has a responsibility to its citizens before it has a responsibility to placating Alberta.

    If, among many things, environmental impact studies have deemed the pipeline too great a risk... then it is what it is. Alberta has oil. Great! It doesn't have an ocean though... wants it... isn't getting it... and threatens to boycott BC wine lol.

    It does, but it also has a responsibility to the union of Canada.

    Different pipeline, point still stands.



    Also, it's not a wine boycott. 
    So what does that video have to do with BC? Do we receive transfer payments from the federal government as a 'have not' province?

    Exactly why should BC be thrilled about a pipeline with a questionable environmental impact when the benefit is really minimal to us? Alberta's expectation of BC is to assume all environmental risks attached to the pipeline and expect very little in return... so that... we are good neighbours? Do I have this right?

    I am not necessarily opposed to the idea of one (a pipeline could work), but I am sorry to say that for me to get behind a pipeline project cutting through our province... there needs to be more motivation than, "Just do it so Albertans can keep their monopoly on the Shuswap." 
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Calgary ABPosts: 1,217
    edited February 17
    Dignin bud.. Save it.  We are on the same page but....

    Im a Candisn first... stated in my post.

    These folks are putting their province ahead of the country, it's clear.  Yet when the Olympics are on or the national anthem is played they sing the national anthem of Canada, not their province.

    still love all parts of our wonderful country... including these folks who are using  their constitutional right to disagree.  My only hope was for people to at least acknowledge that the pipeline was approved after an exhaustive and thorough approval process which included the environmental impact.  The due diligence has been done.

    However, I cannot support a provincial government not performing their responsibility to uphold the constitution. 


    Post edited by 1ThoughtKnown on
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Calgary Seattle
    2014 Amsterdam1 Trieste Vienna Moline St. Paul
    2015 Santiago Buenos Aires
    2018 Prague Kraków Seattle2 Missoula 
    It's egg rollin' thick and heavy...all the past we carry...
    Oh, I could be new...you underestimate me..
  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Calgary ABPosts: 1,217
    edited February 17
    well let's break that long post down shall we?

    1) I asked if you supported NIMBY environmentalism. It was a question.  You made the assumptions there, I was simply asking a question.
    2) although your language is strong (hard to have intelligent conversation full, of f-bombs I'll give it a go) the second pipeline would in theory be better and safer than the existing one as new technology is far better. Now that doesn't mean an accident cannot happen, just it's less likely
    3) I support the slow move away from oil to alternatives (so does Shell judging by their recent corporate directives) however while we have a resource in this country and the world needs it, does it not make sense to exploit that resource and use the revenues for our own benefit? Are jobs not important?
    4) oil coming in or going out is still in the water.  Once again, would you be as vehemently opposed if the line was proposed for Prince Rupert or in the middle of nowhere Bella Coola? 
    5) Environmentalists have been taken over by big money, They have picked a battle against Canadian pipelines and during this whole debate the US has built 19,000 miles of largely unopposed pipelines.  You do not see a correlation there? Perhaps you are not aware that Alberta oil is sold to the US at a discount because the oil is landlocked. Getting this oil to tidewater ensures we get fair market value.
    6) what does BC get out of it.  Well that's an interesting question isn't it? Let's unpack that one.  So the resource is the property of Albertans.  Every Barrel of oil which comes out of the ground results in resource revenue for the province. That resource revenue is part of transfer payments made between all provinces to ensure the have and have-not provinces all receive the same services. Now BC maybe a have province, they may not, but either way the revenue is good for all Canadians, especially those that need it. 
    People working in the oil industry are paying taxes. High wages result in heavy taxes.  That money goes to federal coffers which is i. Turn given to the provinces to pay for social programs, infrastructure, etc.  This does not even count the oil companies who pay a 24% corporate tax rate,  The higher their earnings, the more money goes to federal coffers to be distributed for federal programs and provincial and municipal, etc. 
    Not to mention that people being out of work is a drain on the welfare/EI system which is a drain on taxpayers. Oh, I worked with plenty of people from BC over the years who worked in Alberta and took their high wages back home to BC to spend on their days off. Seems pretty good for the economy to me. 
    7) you are correct that AB cannot continue to rely on oil. We aren't. Our economy is growing st 4% despite oil still suffering. Renewable,electricity particularly wind and solar investments are coming fast and furious. It is exciting. I have been impressed with Rachel Notley, an NDP leader.  She has performed far better than Imever could have  imagined.  
    8) If money doesn't rule the world what will? I paid $652 CDN for a pair of tickets to 2 Pearl Jam shows this summer. I'm not getting to either of them without oil. 

    Lastly, it is AB's constitutional right to get this oil to tidewater. We live in the same COUNTRY! I'm a Canadian first..... but for some reason many Canadians think of Albertans as some sideshow.  All we have ever asked for is some cooperation.... The economic boon is for all Canadians.... Social programs and infrastructure are not free or cheap. 
    i don't claim to know much about this, if at all. so i will only comment on your last paragraph. if you are wondering why the rest of the country has a less-than-cooperative view of alberta, it's due at least in part to that province not wanting to share the wealth with the rest of canada (IT'S OUR OIL!),  but as soon as the well started to run dry, all of a sudden they wanted in everyone else's pockets. it was a bit difficult to really feel sorry. 
    Yet everyone in Canada felt sorry for the citizens of Fort McMurray who had their city partially destroyed by a wildfire.  At that moment, people felt sorry for them and opened their wallets to help out.  It made me proud to be a Canadian as it has so many times before!

    The part that boggles my mind in all of this is that when those same people are out of work noone feels sorry for them (according to your post).  Whenever a province is struggling I was glad we could assist is supporting them. Ensuring all Canadians have the same standard of living through social and infrastructure programs by way of transfer payments (the most misunderstood thing in Canada is transfer payments, and many Albertans are in fact guilty of thinking the money comes straight out of our province).  Albertans didn't "want in your wallets", they just needed some help.  If we can't ask our fellow Canadians for help who,can we ask? 

    its easy to generalize us all, because well it's easy.  But the truth is Albertans are from all over Canada and the world.  Lot of good people here and if you took the time to visit you would probably have a wonderful time.
     And realize we are not "all about oil"   Hugh Dillon and the boys played here in Calgary on New Years Eve.... Was a great show 

    Post edited by 1ThoughtKnown on
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Calgary Seattle
    2014 Amsterdam1 Trieste Vienna Moline St. Paul
    2015 Santiago Buenos Aires
    2018 Prague Kraków Seattle2 Missoula 
    It's egg rollin' thick and heavy...all the past we carry...
    Oh, I could be new...you underestimate me..
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,298
    edited February 17

    Alberta's new allies and Notley's finest hour

    ‘Suddenly this province seems to have some national allies in unlikely places'

    After years of smarting on the wrong side of too many pipeline proxy battles and dead-duck scandals, the legitimate complaints of this beleaguered province seem to be earning their due. And much of this has to be credited to Premier Rachel Notley.

    He gave an interview and said of the B.C. premier, "John Horgan is actually trying to scuttle our national plan on fighting climate change." Horgan's plans to stall out Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline by tacking on more diluted bitumen studies appears to be going nowhere.

    Whatever leverage Horgan might have claimed on this file is largely gone, outside a narrow base. He overplayed his hand and has created a national interest in getting behind Alberta.

    And on the domestic front, United Conservative Party Leader Jason Kenney is outflanked on one of his strengths. Notley has outmanoeuvered him with a trade war retaliation that does almost no harm to Alberta business. This is a stark contrast to his own proposal, which included cutting oil shipment permits to B.C. in order to force a temporary fuel crisis.

    The wine embargo is making the same point. It was a brilliant political chess move that seems to have repositioned all of the other players on the board to Alberta's advantage.

    Is this NDP government really going to cut its oilsands emissions cap and scrap the carbon tax if B.C. continues to obfuscate? Given these were key tenets of Notley's agenda and, presumably, her legacy, it seems unlikely that she would renege.

    Jason Kenney would think nothing of it, however.

    That's the balance that the rest of Canada needs to weigh right now. There are no viable climate change targets without Alberta's co-operation. Undermine Notley, as Horgan has done, and any small chance she may have at re-election will disappear. Support her, on the other hand, and the country can show Alberta that it's been paying attention.

    The nation needs to understand that this province has tried, very hard, to address its environmental concerns while struggling through a downturn. 


    http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/calgary/road-ahead-jen-gerson-rachel-notley-pipeline-wine-winning-1.4538035
    Post edited by dignin on
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252

    Vancouver criticized for boasting about low pay of its tech workers in Amazon HQ bid


    http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/city-of-vancouver-criticized-for-boasting-about-low-pay-of-its-tech-workers-in-amazon-hq-bid

    intersting article...
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252
    The funniest part of the BC/ALBERTA pipeline dispute, is if Notley was premier of BC she’d likely be on the side of anti-pimple people’s, and if. Horgan was premier of Alberta he’d be fighting for the pipelines...it’s just politics.

    A question for BC residents, is the tar sands oil you are opposed to?  What if the tar sands oil was all refined in Alberta, I mean every last drop it, would you accept it through pipelines?  I’m only asking because I’d really like to understad.

    And this trade dispute means that provinces need free trade amongst each other...our premiers have critisized Trump over his threat to withdraw from NAFTA...yet Canada does not have free trade within its own borders...

    personally i think Trudea pooched the dog on this ... I assume these pipelines run through the Canadian Rockies...

    would energy east have accomplished the results?  

    Anyways I love both Alberta and BC...both great  provinces.  Look forward to spending some time in crowsnest pass next summer...

    whatever happens with this pipeline my main hope is that the environment doesn’t get fucked up...

    as for alberta diversifying their economy...good luck...easier said than.  The community I live in his heavily automotive manufacturing and tool and die...the politicians around here have talked diversification for over 20 years...and just a couple weeks ago 4 parts manufactures were put on notice that there could be a strike...all 4 supply 1 facility, nothing else...the mini van plant...I’ve read many automotive analyst believe the mini van plant could be gone within 10 years...if that happens, a whole lotta folks will be losing good paying jobs...I don’t think big box stores will be to emply all these people...really sad...
  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Calgary ABPosts: 1,217
    Interesting Video making the rounds on Facebook

    https://www.facebook.com/What.If.science/videos/2474473509444621/


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Calgary Seattle
    2014 Amsterdam1 Trieste Vienna Moline St. Paul
    2015 Santiago Buenos Aires
    2018 Prague Kraków Seattle2 Missoula 
    It's egg rollin' thick and heavy...all the past we carry...
    Oh, I could be new...you underestimate me..
  • 1ThoughtKnown1ThoughtKnown Calgary ABPosts: 1,217
    The funniest part of the BC/ALBERTA pipeline dispute, is if Notley was premier of BC she’d likely be on the side of anti-pimple people’s, and if. Horgan was premier of Alberta he’d be fighting for the pipelines...it’s just politics.

    A question for BC residents, is the tar sands oil you are opposed to?  What if the tar sands oil was all refined in Alberta, I mean every last drop it, would you accept it through pipelines?  I’m only asking because I’d really like to understad.

    And this trade dispute means that provinces need free trade amongst each other...our premiers have critisized Trump over his threat to withdraw from NAFTA...yet Canada does not have free trade within its own borders...

    personally i think Trudea pooched the dog on this ... I assume these pipelines run through the Canadian Rockies...

    would energy east have accomplished the results?  

    Anyways I love both Alberta and BC...both great  provinces.  Look forward to spending some time in crowsnest pass next summer...

    whatever happens with this pipeline my main hope is that the environment doesn’t get fucked up...

    as for alberta diversifying their economy...good luck...easier said than.  The community I live in his heavily automotive manufacturing and tool and die...the politicians around here have talked diversification for over 20 years...and just a couple weeks ago 4 parts manufactures were put on notice that there could be a strike...all 4 supply 1 facility, nothing else...the mini van plant...I’ve read many automotive analyst believe the mini van plant could be gone within 10 years...if that happens, a whole lotta folks will be losing good paying jobs...I don’t think big box stores will be to emply all these people...really sad...
    Great post.

    the crux of the NDP issue is they were a “worker first” party who was usurped by the environmentalists.  

    Now one they have to walk the fine line between making the unions happy and environmentalists happy.  Wes all care for the environment, but I’m not going to live in a cardboard box and neither are they. 

    Mayor Nenshi of Calgary was in South Korea and visited some refineries there who are begging for oil from a nation who supports human rights and the environment. The WORLD needs us. We import oil from the same despot nations which must make the rest of the world scratch their heads.

    Instead we are too busy fighting amongst ourselves. 

    Mad for your community struggles with the Auto industry... I empathize.  But Alberta is not ALL oil, that I can assure you.  We are resource based... but that is the blessing Canada has!

    if the world needs it... let’s sell it.

    yiu are right about Trudeau. He’s spineless.  He doesn’t want to alienate BC voters... could care less about Alberta because he knows we would never elect him.   That’s politics, but in the big picture for reasons I stated on an earlier post, getting oil to tidewater is important for our economy.  
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Calgary Seattle
    2014 Amsterdam1 Trieste Vienna Moline St. Paul
    2015 Santiago Buenos Aires
    2018 Prague Kraków Seattle2 Missoula 
    It's egg rollin' thick and heavy...all the past we carry...
    Oh, I could be new...you underestimate me..
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,167
    For investors who want the worst of both worlds - "modest" returns and the ability to support slimy pseudo-journalism, here's the vehicle for you!

    TORONTO — Ezra Levant's Rebel Media has teamed up with a wealth management firm to launch a retirement saving fund geared toward Canadians who want to invest in the highly controversial and conservative online news site.

    The Wells Plus 6ix Rebel Freedom Fund is run by Alberta-based Wells Asset Management.

    The firm says the RRSP eligible income fund is directed at investors who "desire modest, regular, steady income," and is advertised as having a four per cent target rate of return.

    It also says the fund is suitable for investors who want to help Rebel Media expand by funding Rebel projects such as film and television-style programming, online apps, and even real estate-related projects such as studios.

    Levant came under heavy criticism last year after the Rebel Media founder admitted the site's content and management need more oversight in the wake of a string of controversies.

    One reporter was fired, another founder quit and two other contributors resigned in August after the outlet came under intense criticism for its coverage of deadly riots in Virginia.

    At the time, Levant also pledged greater transparency for the outlet's finances, after two other former contributors levied a string of allegations over where Rebel Media's largely crowdsourced budget was actually going.


    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/02/24/rebel-media-rrsp_a_23370050/?utm_hp_ref=ca-homepage
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,167
    It's good to see our conservative politicians rejecting alt-right/white supremacist agenda, at least in the media

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/02/25/tanya-granic-allen-rejects-endorsement-for-ontario-pc-leader-from-white-nationalist-paul-fromm_a_23370597/?utm_hp_ref=ca-homepage
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,167
    Oh jeez..... they still haven't decided?

    Well, the longer they delay, the longer we have before we potentially have to acknowledge that Ford won.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/03/10/leader-ontario-pc-party_a_23382284/?utm_hp_ref=ca-homepage
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,167
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252
    Oh please...Ontario politics is a fucking joke.  The conservatives had a great candidate in Christine Elliot, they didn’t need a leadship race, they should have parachuted her to the leadership role...fuck Ford, Mulroney and that other twit.  The only real candidate was Elliot.  I wouldn’t waste my time going to the poles to vote for Ford, Horwath, or the useles Twitter Wynn.
  • oftenreadingoftenreading Victoria, BCPosts: 8,167
    My condolences, Ontario
    my small self... like a book amongst the many on a shelf
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252
    It’s official Ford won ... Ontario poiitics have nothing but garbage running the 3 parties ... what garbage people of Ontario get to choose in a June...First that loser Brown. Now Ford...
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,298
    Really Ford? I thought it was just the idiots in the Toronto suburbs that would vote for that mess. What the fuck is up with politics today?  
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252
    Ontario politics is sad...Christine Elliot should be the leader...

    I think Ford will still win.

    i just happen to think Elliot would make a good premier.

    The only thing I can think of that got Ford elected is his anti-elite campaign he ran, but in my eyes if you are wealthy you are part of the elite.  
  • dignindignin Posts: 6,298
    Ontario politics is sad...Christine Elliot should be the leader...

    I think Ford will still win.

    i just happen to think Elliot would make a good premier.

    The only thing I can think of that got Ford elected is his anti-elite campaign he ran, but in my eyes if you are wealthy you are part of the elite.  
    Sadly, being anti-elite these days is being anti-brains. It's got nothing to do with money.

    I prefer my leader's to be smarter than me, but I fear I'm in the minority.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252
    dignin said:
    Ontario politics is sad...Christine Elliot should be the leader...

    I think Ford will still win.

    i just happen to think Elliot would make a good premier.

    The only thing I can think of that got Ford elected is his anti-elite campaign he ran, but in my eyes if you are wealthy you are part of the elite.  
    Sadly, being anti-elite these days is being anti-brains. It's got nothing to do with money.

    I prefer my leader's to be smarter than me, but I fear I'm in the minority.
    In Ontario politics we seem to lack brains right now.  The best choice in a Ontario is the Green Party, but they are no where close to winning a general election, they are no where close to even winning a single seat.  At this point the anti-liberal, anti Wynn  movement will likely lead Ford to the premiers chair...unless he really says something stupid, and I wouldn’t rule that out.
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252

    Trudeau Liberals axe funding for books for the blind


    https://globalnews.ca/news/4075364/trudeau-liberals-cut-funding-cnib-accessible-books/

    they are abviously asking for more than we give...
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252
    SECOND OPINION | Canadian families stunned by 3,000% increase in price of life-saving drug

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/second-opinion-procysbi-cystagon-march10-1.4570152

    Another victory for big pharma with the help of the government...
  • Meltdown99Meltdown99 None Of Your Business...Posts: 2,252
    Caribbean vacation turns into parasite nightmare for Windsor couple

    http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/caribbean-vacation-turns-into-parasite-nightmare-for-windsor-couple

    They had to get the necessary medicine states side...


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