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anyone a lawyer or work crime scene investigation?

this is a very random question and a very random situation
the scenario is someone gets shot outside a grocery store and comes in and bleeds everywhere.
the store manager makes a employee clean up that blood. 
aren't people who are trained supposed to clean up human blood? 
should this person contact the local health department?? I feel so much is wrong with this situation... like what if the victim has AIDS? 
can any lawyers or crime scene people chime in?

thanks 

Comments

  • eeriepadaveeeriepadave West Chester, PAPosts: 34,841
    Sounds like the police should be involved. 
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  • RS151862RS151862 Pittsburgh, PAPosts: 2,404
    Were you the shooter?
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  • FifthelementFifthelement LotuslandPosts: 6,678
    I’m not either of those things.  Does your company have a health and safety plan? There should be a section in there on cleaning up bio-hazards and who is responsible for it. From personal experience, years ago, we had a situation in one of the public toilets.  Staff refused to clean it up so a cleaning company was hired to come in.

    Regardless, proper safety equipment should be supplied to the person who has to clean the area.  
    "What the CANUCK happened?!? - Esquimalt Barber Shop
  • PureandEasyPureandEasy Posts: 5,583
    I am neither of those either but there are absolute bio-hazard clean up regulations.  I do work in the blood bank industry and know this for a fact.  Asking an employee of a grocery store to clean up any type of human bodily fluids is absurd, unless employees go through training for this very thing.  AIDs is not the only risk, there are other infectious diseases that can be acquired through exposure to bodily fluids, some viruses can live outside the body for a period of time.  Say for instance, you got a paper cut recently, and although minor, it's still an open wound on your body, if you come in contact with someone else's blood (via cleaning up a crime scene) . . . and that person has Hepatitis B, you have been exposed to Hepatitis B and could acquire it.  That is specifically why there are federal guidelines for bio-hazardous waste clean up and disposal.
    GIVE BLOOD
  • a5pja5pj Hershey PAPosts: 3,360
    I am neither of those either but there are absolute bio-hazard clean up regulations.  I do work in the blood bank industry and know this for a fact.  Asking an employee of a grocery store to clean up any type of human bodily fluids is absurd, unless employees go through training for this very thing.  AIDs is not the only risk, there are other infectious diseases that can be acquired through exposure to bodily fluids, some viruses can live outside the body for a period of time.  Say for instance, you got a paper cut recently, and although minor, it's still an open wound on your body, if you come in contact with someone else's blood (via cleaning up a crime scene) . . . and that person has Hepatitis B, you have been exposed to Hepatitis B and could acquire it.  That is specifically why there are federal guidelines for bio-hazardous waste clean up and disposal.
    Thank you for your blood bank work1 I've donated consistently for years now, more ppl should :)
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  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 26,547
    Trained people whom are used to doing this should have cleaned it up.  If you don't know how to use a "Blood Borne Pathogen" kit or weren't given one to clean it up then you have a serious lawsuit on your hands.
  • PureandEasyPureandEasy Posts: 5,583
    a5pj said:
    I am neither of those either but there are absolute bio-hazard clean up regulations.  I do work in the blood bank industry and know this for a fact.  Asking an employee of a grocery store to clean up any type of human bodily fluids is absurd, unless employees go through training for this very thing.  AIDs is not the only risk, there are other infectious diseases that can be acquired through exposure to bodily fluids, some viruses can live outside the body for a period of time.  Say for instance, you got a paper cut recently, and although minor, it's still an open wound on your body, if you come in contact with someone else's blood (via cleaning up a crime scene) . . . and that person has Hepatitis B, you have been exposed to Hepatitis B and could acquire it.  That is specifically why there are federal guidelines for bio-hazardous waste clean up and disposal.
    Thank you for your blood bank work1 I've donated consistently for years now, more ppl should :)
    Yes they should, I just got my 16 gallon pin.  Donating blood saves lives, it cost nothing to you and means so much to complete strangers.  Don't wait till you are watching a loved one suffer from cancer, or trauma injury to realize how much a blood transfusion can save their life . . . become a donor today and God forbid, if you are ever faced with either of those situations, you can say, I did this for someone else and thankfully someone else was there when my loved one needs it.   
    GIVE BLOOD
  • FifthelementFifthelement LotuslandPosts: 6,678
    a5pj said:
    I am neither of those either but there are absolute bio-hazard clean up regulations.  I do work in the blood bank industry and know this for a fact.  Asking an employee of a grocery store to clean up any type of human bodily fluids is absurd, unless employees go through training for this very thing.  AIDs is not the only risk, there are other infectious diseases that can be acquired through exposure to bodily fluids, some viruses can live outside the body for a period of time.  Say for instance, you got a paper cut recently, and although minor, it's still an open wound on your body, if you come in contact with someone else's blood (via cleaning up a crime scene) . . . and that person has Hepatitis B, you have been exposed to Hepatitis B and could acquire it.  That is specifically why there are federal guidelines for bio-hazardous waste clean up and disposal.
    Thank you for your blood bank work1 I've donated consistently for years now, more ppl should :)
    Yes they should, I just got my 16 gallon pin.  Donating blood saves lives, it cost nothing to you and means so much to complete strangers.  Don't wait till you are watching a loved one suffer from cancer, or trauma injury to realize how much a blood transfusion can save their life . . . become a donor today and God forbid, if you are ever faced with either of those situations, you can say, I did this for someone else and thankfully someone else was there when my loved one needs it.   
    “Blood.  It’s in you to give.” Is the motto of Canadian Blood Services. I used to give regularly, every 52 days or so, and when I lived in Edmonton I used to donate plasma every 10 days. Unfortunately, I've been trying to get my anaemia under control so I haven’t been donating lately.
    "What the CANUCK happened?!? - Esquimalt Barber Shop
  • PureandEasyPureandEasy Posts: 5,583
    a5pj said:
    I am neither of those either but there are absolute bio-hazard clean up regulations.  I do work in the blood bank industry and know this for a fact.  Asking an employee of a grocery store to clean up any type of human bodily fluids is absurd, unless employees go through training for this very thing.  AIDs is not the only risk, there are other infectious diseases that can be acquired through exposure to bodily fluids, some viruses can live outside the body for a period of time.  Say for instance, you got a paper cut recently, and although minor, it's still an open wound on your body, if you come in contact with someone else's blood (via cleaning up a crime scene) . . . and that person has Hepatitis B, you have been exposed to Hepatitis B and could acquire it.  That is specifically why there are federal guidelines for bio-hazardous waste clean up and disposal.
    Thank you for your blood bank work1 I've donated consistently for years now, more ppl should :)
    Yes they should, I just got my 16 gallon pin.  Donating blood saves lives, it cost nothing to you and means so much to complete strangers.  Don't wait till you are watching a loved one suffer from cancer, or trauma injury to realize how much a blood transfusion can save their life . . . become a donor today and God forbid, if you are ever faced with either of those situations, you can say, I did this for someone else and thankfully someone else was there when my loved one needs it.   
    “Blood.  It’s in you to give.” Is the motto of Canadian Blood Services. I used to give regularly, every 52 days or so, and when I lived in Edmonton I used to donate plasma every 10 days. Unfortunately, I've been trying to get my anaemia under control so I haven’t been donating lately.
    Donor safety is as important as recipient safety; that is why the first question on our blood donor record every time you present to donate is, Are you feeling healthy and well today?  Take care and if your circumstances change, then you can consider donating again, but if not, at least your heart is in the right place.  BTW, I like the motto.  
    GIVE BLOOD
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