MLB 2019 Season

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Comments

  • DewieCoxDewieCox Posts: 9,804
    Pay the players for small ball and they’ll play more small ball.
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 14,329
    DewieCox said:
    Pay the players for small ball and they’ll play more small ball.
    Also a big factor.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 18,550
    DewieCox said:
    Pay the players for small ball and they’ll play more small ball.
    I'd take players like Altuve and Trea Turner all day long.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 18,550
    Looking at Trout and the numbers he puts up, it's such a shame that my beloved Halos can't build a team around him.  It's just pitiful.

    How bad would the Angels be without him?  They stink already.
  • WobbieWobbie Posts: 25,073
    12 years ago yesterday, Bonds was intentionally walked to open an inning (6th). hasn't happened since.
    If I had known then what I know now...

    Vegas 93, Vegas 98, Vegas 00 (10 year show), Vegas 03, Vegas 06
    VIC 07
    EV LA1 08
    Seattle1 09, Seattle2 09, Salt Lake 09, LA4 09
    Columbus 10
    EV LA 11
    Vancouver 11
    Missoula 12
    Portland 13, Spokane 13
    St. Paul 14, Denver 14
    Philly I & II, 16
  • WobbieWobbie Posts: 25,073
    and, oh yeah, he was 42 years old and in his final season.
    If I had known then what I know now...

    Vegas 93, Vegas 98, Vegas 00 (10 year show), Vegas 03, Vegas 06
    VIC 07
    EV LA1 08
    Seattle1 09, Seattle2 09, Salt Lake 09, LA4 09
    Columbus 10
    EV LA 11
    Vancouver 11
    Missoula 12
    Portland 13, Spokane 13
    St. Paul 14, Denver 14
    Philly I & II, 16
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 12,408
    Wobbie said:
    12 years ago yesterday, Bonds was intentionally walked to open an inning (6th). hasn't happened since.
    Was his massive head crowding the plate?
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 18,550
    mrussel1 said:
    Wobbie said:
    12 years ago yesterday, Bonds was intentionally walked to open an inning (6th). hasn't happened since.
    Was his massive head crowding the plate?
    Everyone talks about his head.  Look at a damn pic of yourself when you were 20 and then when you were 35 and tell me if your head shrank or grew...
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 12,408
    mrussel1 said:
    Wobbie said:
    12 years ago yesterday, Bonds was intentionally walked to open an inning (6th). hasn't happened since.
    Was his massive head crowding the plate?
    Everyone talks about his head.  Look at a damn pic of yourself when you were 20 and then when you were 35 and tell me if your head shrank or grew...
    Not like that shit. 
  • dignindignin Posts: 7,197
    edited June 13
    Wrong thread..
    Post edited by dignin on
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 18,550
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Wobbie said:
    12 years ago yesterday, Bonds was intentionally walked to open an inning (6th). hasn't happened since.
    Was his massive head crowding the plate?
    Everyone talks about his head.  Look at a damn pic of yourself when you were 20 and then when you were 35 and tell me if your head shrank or grew...
    Not like that shit. 
    This is by no means scientific but I found it funny.
    http://www.highheatstats.com/2012/02/how-barry-bonds-head-changed-from-1987-to-2007/
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 12,408
    mrussel1 said:
    mrussel1 said:
    Wobbie said:
    12 years ago yesterday, Bonds was intentionally walked to open an inning (6th). hasn't happened since.
    Was his massive head crowding the plate?
    Everyone talks about his head.  Look at a damn pic of yourself when you were 20 and then when you were 35 and tell me if your head shrank or grew...
    Not like that shit. 
    This is by no means scientific but I found it funny.
    http://www.highheatstats.com/2012/02/how-barry-bonds-head-changed-from-1987-to-2007/
    When I first saw the pic, I thought it was Bobby.  
  • HesCalledDyerHesCalledDyer MarylandPosts: 14,329
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 18,550
    Seager is hurt again?

    Damn him.  I rally thought he was going to kill this year.


  • cutzcutz Posts: 8,041
    Rosenthal: It’s not baseball, it’s Bludgeon Ball. And the frequency of home runs is nothing short of numbing


    By Ken Rosenthal Jun 13, 2019  272  
    Major League Baseball needs to face reality. It’s time to deaden the baseball. Not to create a second Dead Ball Era. Just to get back to normal.

    The way home runs are flying, they’re losing their meaning, their relevance, their ability to connect the game of today with the game of yesterday. And if you ruin the home-run records, you’re risking major damage to the sport. We know this because it happened, not so long ago.

    Know why I hated the Steroid Era? It wasn’t just the cheating, the creation of uneven playing fields between those who used and those who did not. It also was the warping of statistics, the distortion of generational comparisons fans and reporters cherish, even though they rarely were apples-to-apples to begin with.

    Well, here we are again.

    Not with a fresh influx of performance-enhancing drugs, though some players almost certainly are using them, even with stricter testing. No, the sport’s continuing home-run eruption is mostly due to a more aerodynamic composition of the baseball, a development acknowledged by a committee of 10 scientists and data specialists appointed by MLB last season. The rising home-run numbers are not necessarily inauthentic, the way they were during the Steroid Era. But the frequency of homers is nothing short of numbing.

    It’s not baseball, it’s Bludgeon Ball. And it’s producing sensory overload.

    In the past four days, we’ve seen a season-high 486-foot home-run by Ian Desmond, four straight homers by the Nationals, four in an inning by the Braves, 13 combined by the Phillies and Diamondbacks, a major-league record for a single game. The sport was averaging 2.70 homers for both teams per game, a pace that would shatter the all-time mark of 2.51, set in 2017.

    The solution is obvious, and one that baseball possibly could accomplish without approval from the players’ union – the composition of the ball has not previously been raised in bargaining.

    The MLB committee determined the ball was traveling with decreased air resistance, or drag. It could not explain how or why the changes in the ball took place, though there is nothing to suggest baseball did anything sinister; commissioner Rob Manfred, too, wanted answers, and released them publicly. Still, this is the third straight season in which the ball has been a major topic of conversation. By next season, baseball needs to act upon its findings, and introduce a different ball.

    The sport previously has reacted to extreme swings in on-field performance, lowering the mound from 15 inches to 10 after the Year of the Pitcher in 1968, then taking the air out of the Rabbit Ball when home runs spiked in 1987. While no one in authority explicitly condemned the Rabbit Ball, baseball’s actions spoke louder than words. From 1985 to ‘87, home runs for both teams per game increased from 1.71 to 1.81 to 2.12. They then returned to even lower levels – 1.51 and 1.46 – the following two seasons, and surely not by accident.

    The same kind of adjustment is now necessary. Fans love homers. Children, and many adults, love sugar. But at some point, enough is enough. How can teams accurately evaluate hitters in the current environment? How can they accurately evaluate pitchers? Statistics determine how players are paid. And every night, often several times a night, something happens that is just . . .  not . . . normal.

    The Mets’ Mickey Callaway and Pirates’ Clint Hurdle are among the managers who cite poor pitching for the record home-run pace, with Callaway saying recently, “Any time you’re giving up more home runs, it’s just execution.” To be sure, the trend of pitchers relying on power over precision is a problem. Hitters also are changing their approaches in this age of defensive shifts, with more trying to increase their launch angles to get balls into the air. But anyone watching the games can see, without confirmation from Statcast, that the ball is flying like never before.

    Other professional sports also are gravitating toward extremes – the NFL is more of a passing game now, the NBA a three-point shooting extravaganza. Baseball’s home-run craze, though, is not the product of a natural evolution, a confluence of factors leading to a gradual annual increase. No, the trend is explained far more easily. Triple-A leagues, using the major-league ball for the first time this season, are averaging a home run every 25 at-bats, as opposed to one every 38.2 last season with the old minor-league ball.

    This would be known as ringing evidence.

    Here’s guessing that, just as after the 1987 season, baseball and Rawlings, its official ball supplier, could figure out the adjustments necessary to return home-run totals to something close to their previous levels. The subsequent increase in balls in play would be a first step toward reducing the three-true outcome rate (home runs, walks, strikeouts), which is at an all-time high for the fourth straight season.

    Yes, the issues with the on-field product run far deeper than home runs. A certain percentage of fans are loathe to accept any change to a game steeped in tradition. But within the sport, everyone from club officials to the game’s top decision-makers decry the lack of action, believing it will limit growth in the fan base. One prominent executive this week described major-league games as “painful to watch.” He is hardly alone in that view.

    Baseball, in conjunction with the players’ union, already has adopted a series of rules changes designed to increase the pace of play and reduce the reliance on relief pitching in 2019 and ‘20. It is experimenting with additional, more radical changes in partnership with the independent Atlantic League. The ideas need to keep flowing, the two sides need to keep talking. Change is difficult. But remaining stagnant cannot be an option.

    Perhaps more fans would be alarmed over the current state of affairs if, say, Christian Yelich was on pace for 80 homers. No such individual outliers exist; Yelich, the major-league leader in homers, is on pace for a mere 60. He is one of 25, however, who are on pace to hit at least 40, which would far exceed the record of 17 in 1996. Twenty teams, meanwhile, are on pace to hit 200 homers. As noted by ESPN’s Buster Olney, only one reached that total in 2013.

    It’s Bludgeon Ball, all right, and even though the circumstances are different, I’ve got the same uneasy feeling I did in the Steroid Era. I’m not sure what to believe anymore.

  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 18,550
    @cutz great article.

    In 1987 as a kid reading the backs of baseball cards I was surprised at a few players' stats.  One in particular was Wade Boggs.  The singles hitter.  He had 24 that year.

    I like that the idea of "small ball" or strictly getting on base is in Rosenthals mind.

    Where are the squeeze plays, stolen bases, slap hitters?

    I do also like his take on power pitching.  I brought that up earlier in this thread.  Everyone throws 95+ and no one does placement pitching sans like 2 pitchers really.

    I'd like to see an 89mph pitcher who paints the corners be dominant.  Actually I'd like to see a few of them.

    Thoughts?
  • markymark550markymark550 Columbia, SCPosts: 4,407
    I like the idea of small ball too. Don't get me wrong, I love a home run, but not 20 in a game.
  • cutzcutz Posts: 8,041
    ^^^Some crazy stats^^^
  • cutzcutz Posts: 8,041
    @cutz great article.

    In 1987 as a kid reading the backs of baseball cards I was surprised at a few players' stats.  One in particular was Wade Boggs.  The singles hitter.  He had 24 that year.

    I like that the idea of "small ball" or strictly getting on base is in Rosenthals mind.

    Where are the squeeze plays, stolen bases, slap hitters?

    I do also like his take on power pitching.  I brought that up earlier in this thread.  Everyone throws 95+ and no one does placement pitching sans like 2 pitchers really.

    I'd like to see an 89mph pitcher who paints the corners be dominant.  Actually I'd like to see a few of them.

    Thoughts?
    Yeah, i thought that was a good article so i thought i'd pass it along.

    I think Boggs could've hit about that many HR's that he did  in '87 (24 HR's) , on a consistent basis.  But, he would hit the ball where the ball was pitched(Line drives the other way and base hits up the middle. 

    Man, i don't think there is one slap hitter in all of baseball anymore?

    Maybe with so many pitchers throwing 95+ the hitters are used to seeing it and that could be a reason why more HR's? Not sure scouts will even look at pitchers if they aren't lighting up the Radar Gun.


  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 18,550
    cutz said:
    @cutz great article.

    In 1987 as a kid reading the backs of baseball cards I was surprised at a few players' stats.  One in particular was Wade Boggs.  The singles hitter.  He had 24 that year.

    I like that the idea of "small ball" or strictly getting on base is in Rosenthals mind.

    Where are the squeeze plays, stolen bases, slap hitters?

    I do also like his take on power pitching.  I brought that up earlier in this thread.  Everyone throws 95+ and no one does placement pitching sans like 2 pitchers really.

    I'd like to see an 89mph pitcher who paints the corners be dominant.  Actually I'd like to see a few of them.

    Thoughts?
    Yeah, i thought that was a good article so i thought i'd pass it along.

    I think Boggs could've hit about that many HR's that he did  in '87 (24 HR's) , on a consistent basis.  But, he would hit the ball where the ball was pitched(Line drives the other way and base hits up the middle. 

    Man, i don't think there is one slap hitter in all of baseball anymore?

    Maybe with so many pitchers throwing 95+ the hitters are used to seeing it and that could be a reason why more HR's? Not sure scouts will even look at pitchers if they aren't lighting up the Radar Gun.


    With other stories I've read I have come to the conclusion that pitchers that have stellar control will be more prevalent as will pitchers start throwing up in the strikezone more now that everyone is swinging up looking for a "launch angle".

    That ball is really hard to hit when it's high and you are uppercutting.

    More on Boggs.

    In 1996 I went to a Seattle/Yanks game at the Kingdome and Strawberry was hitting bombs into the stands.  Boggs follows him and starts banging them into the upper deck.

    Straw comes back and says "hell nah" and jacks some more into the upper decks.  

    Boggs comes up AGAIN and hits a few more into the upperdecks.

    Straw comes up one last time and sends a few more moon shots into the uppers.

    That was a cool exchange between the two and neat to see Boggs banging them out like that.

    Always, always go to batting practice.  You never know what u might see.
  • tempo_n_groovetempo_n_groove Posts: 18,550
    Matt Carpenter bunted against the shift and got a double.

    Good for him, lol!!!
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2019/06/17/cardinals-matt-carpenter-beats-shift-bunt-double/1484448001/
  • cutzcutz Posts: 8,041
    Matt Carpenter bunted against the shift and got a double.

    Good for him, lol!!!
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2019/06/17/cardinals-matt-carpenter-beats-shift-bunt-double/1484448001/
    Should be done more often.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 12,408
    cutz said:
    Matt Carpenter bunted against the shift and got a double.

    Good for him, lol!!!
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2019/06/17/cardinals-matt-carpenter-beats-shift-bunt-double/1484448001/
    Should be done more often.
    Mercado from teh Tribe stole home last week because of the shift.  
  • igotid88igotid88 Posts: 16,347
    Matt Carpenter bunted against the shift and got a double.

    Good for him, lol!!!
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2019/06/17/cardinals-matt-carpenter-beats-shift-bunt-double/1484448001/
    Of course he does it against a team that's down and woud have given up an off the wall double.
    I miss igotid88
  • Cliffy6745Cliffy6745 Posts: 28,628
    edited June 19
    There are 9 ways to get to first base. What are they? I got 7 easily but couldn't get the last couple.
  • pjhawkspjhawks Posts: 9,502
    There are 9 ways to get to first base. What are they? I got 7 easily but couldn't get the last couple.
    walk with 4 thrown balls
    intentional walk
    single
    double
    triple
    home run
    pinch run
    hit by pitch
    catcher's interference

  • Cliffy6745Cliffy6745 Posts: 28,628
    pjhawks said:
    There are 9 ways to get to first base. What are they? I got 7 easily but couldn't get the last couple.
    walk with 4 thrown balls
    intentional walk
    single
    double
    triple
    home run
    pinch run
    hit by pitch
    catcher's interference

    Walk and intentional walk are both a walk. Counts as one
    Single, Double, triple, home run are all a hit. Counts as one
    Pinch hit is incorrect.
    Hit by pitch and catcher's interference are both correct

    4.
  • mrussel1mrussel1 Posts: 12,408
    pjhawks said:
    There are 9 ways to get to first base. What are they? I got 7 easily but couldn't get the last couple.
    walk with 4 thrown balls
    intentional walk
    single
    double
    triple
    home run
    pinch run
    hit by pitch
    catcher's interference

    Walk and intentional walk are both a walk. Counts as one
    Single, Double, triple, home run are all a hit. Counts as one
    Pinch hit is incorrect.
    Hit by pitch and catcher's interference are both correct

    4.
    Strike out with a pass ball, no runner on first or with two outs. 
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