Stanford rapist

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  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,242

    maybe the judge is sympathetic for a reason. not an accusation, just thinking out loud.

    There's no question he was sympathetic for a reason.

    People here are wondering what 'good' reason he might possibly have?

    The rationale he offered hardly suffices and just stinks. Jail will be too hard?

    Poor poor weird rapist.
    is he sending him somewhere there's a pool so he can swim even faster when he gets out?
  • g under pg under p Surfing The far side of THE Sombrero GalaxyPosts: 17,431
    Well everyone things are FINALLY catching up to that judge.....

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/jun/14/stanford-sexual-assault-judge-aaron-persky-removed-case

    Peace
    *We CAN bomb the World to pieces, but we CAN'T bomb it into PEACE*...Michael Franti

    *MUSIC IS the expression of EMOTION.....and that POLITICS IS merely the DECOY of PERCEPTION*
    .....song_Music & Politics....Michael Franti

    *The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite INSANE*....Nikola Tesla(a man who shaped our world of electricity with his futuristic inventions)


  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,242
    g under p said:
    how does one remove a judge from the bench? who has the authority to "fire" him?
  • BentleyspopBentleyspop Craft Beer Brewery, ColoradoPosts: 5,306

    g under p said:
    how does one remove a judge from the bench? who has the authority to "fire" him?
    He was elected
    He is currently up for reelection and running unopposed.
    Only recourse now is the recall process I believe
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727

    maybe the judge is sympathetic for a reason. not an accusation, just thinking out loud.

    There's no question he was sympathetic for a reason.

    People here are wondering what 'good' reason he might possibly have?

    The rationale he offered hardly suffices and just stinks. Jail will be too hard?

    Poor poor weird rapist.
    Yeah, everyone has a reason for everything. The question is whether or not it's a logical, lawful, justifiable, acceptable reason for a judge to base a sentence on.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • Who PrincessWho Princess out here in the fieldsPosts: 7,135
    Another spot on column from one of my favorite writers, Leonard Pitts: http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/06/fix_the_culture_that_makes_bro.html
    Fix the culture that makes Brock Turner possible

    This is a column about the value of six.

    Actually, it's about three individual sixes and their respective values. The first six came after a 23-year-old woman - her name has never been revealed - spoke in court to address the man who raped her last year, who took her out behind the dumpsters and penetrated her with his fingers after she had too much to drink and passed out at a party. He might have gone further, except that he was spotted by two passersby who tackled him when he tried to run.

    "You don't know me," she told 20-year-old Brock Turner, a former student at Stanford University, an Olympic hopeful in swimming, "but you've been inside me, and that's why we're here today."

    She spoke of the rape and its aftermath, including the fact that that awful night a year and a half ago has left her sleeping with the lights on "like a five year old." In her statement (which you can - and should - read at Buzzfeed.com) the woman describes how it felt, after a long and invasive rape exam, to finally be alone with herself in the shower.

    "I stood there examining my body beneath the stream of water and decided, I don't want my body anymore. I was terrified of it, I didn't know what had been in it, if it had been contaminated, who had touched it. I wanted to take off my body like a jacket and leave it at the hospital with everything else."

    Turner's father, Dan, also offered a statement, pleading for leniency for his son. "His life will never be the one that he dreamed about and worked so hard to achieve. That is a steep price to pay for 20 minutes of action out of his 20-plus years of life."

    Turner was facing up to 14 years in prison. Judge Aaron Persky gave him the aforementioned six. Months.

    A harsher sentence "would have a severe impact on him," explained the judge.

    Persky's compassion for the rapist - and lack thereof for the victim - has detonated social media like a bomb. People are furious. They are weeping. They are calling Turner a "monster." At this writing, a petition at Change.org demanding Persky's recall stands north of 900,000 signatures.

    Which brings us to the second six.

    The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network says that one woman in every six has been the victim of an attempted or completed sexual assault. It's an awesome, awful number. Think about it in terms of women you know. Think about Bonnie, Kadijah, Heather, Consuela, Sarah and Kim. One, two, three, four, five .

    Six.

    Maybe she's never told you about it, so maybe you think it didn't - couldn't - have happened, not to one of your six. But the numbers are what the numbers are. Maryum, Stephanie, Yumiko, Keshia, Laurie . and Pam. One, two, three, four, five .

    And six.

    It's not a big number. You were counting past it in kindergarten.

    For an American woman, it's a measure of the danger she faces from predatory men who consider her body to be their right. It is the difference between self-confidence and fear.

    For Turner's victim, it is a measure of the value the justice system placed on her trauma - and on her. It is the difference between the free woman she was and the frightened one she has become.

    For Turner, it is the fraction of his life he's been ordered to pay for the arrogant violation of another person's self. It is the difference between spring and fall.

    And here's the final six: According to RAINN, only six in every thousand perpetrators of sexual assault end up in prison.

    If you are a woman, or a man who cares about women, you ought to seethe, and then you ought to do whatever you can to fix a culture that makes possible a Brock Turner - and an Aaron Persky. Because, either way you look at it, the value of six is small - too small for safety, too small for solace.

    And way too small for justice.
    "The stars are all connected to the brain."
  • FreeFree Posts: 3,562
    PJ_Soul said:

    maybe the judge is sympathetic for a reason. not an accusation, just thinking out loud.

    There's no question he was sympathetic for a reason.

    People here are wondering what 'good' reason he might possibly have?

    The rationale he offered hardly suffices and just stinks. Jail will be too hard?

    Poor poor weird rapist.
    Yeah, everyone has a reason for everything. The question is whether or not it's a logical, lawful, justifiable, acceptable reason for a judge to base a sentence on.
    Makes one think money could be involved.

    Kinda like that kid who got away on an affluent excuse. Then fled to Mexico w/ his mother in Dec.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    Free said:

    PJ_Soul said:

    maybe the judge is sympathetic for a reason. not an accusation, just thinking out loud.

    There's no question he was sympathetic for a reason.

    People here are wondering what 'good' reason he might possibly have?

    The rationale he offered hardly suffices and just stinks. Jail will be too hard?

    Poor poor weird rapist.
    Yeah, everyone has a reason for everything. The question is whether or not it's a logical, lawful, justifiable, acceptable reason for a judge to base a sentence on.
    Makes one think money could be involved.

    Kinda like that kid who got away on an affluent excuse. Then fled to Mexico w/ his mother in Dec.
    Oh yeah, what was he called again? Afflicted by affluence or something like that? Affluence flu? The poor baby.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • FreeFree Posts: 3,562
    edited June 2016
    Affluenza. So sheltered by his affluent Upbringing, he " didn't know any better" when he drank, drove and killed like 5 people.
    Post edited by Free on
  • Who PrincessWho Princess out here in the fieldsPosts: 7,135
    Ethan Couch. He and his mom were arrested and brought back. He's currently doing time in the county jail, having violated his probation.
    "The stars are all connected to the brain."
  • Jason PJason P Posts: 17,109
    The judge followed the recommendation of the probation officer:

    Monica Lassettre, the probation officer who wrote sentencing recommendations, advised the judge to be lenient partly on the grounds that Mr. Turner was drunk. “This case, when compared to other crimes of similar nature, may be considered less serious due to the defendant’s level of intoxication.”

    She recommended four to six months in a county jail, even though Mr. Turner faced a maximum sentence of 14 years in state prison. She also based her recommendation on what she said was his “sincere remorse and empathy for the victim,” and his lack of a prior criminal record.


    nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/brock-turner-stanford-rape.html?_r=0
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,242
    Jason P said:

    The judge followed the recommendation of the probation officer:

    Monica Lassettre, the probation officer who wrote sentencing recommendations, advised the judge to be lenient partly on the grounds that Mr. Turner was drunk. “This case, when compared to other crimes of similar nature, may be considered less serious due to the defendant’s level of intoxication.”

    She recommended four to six months in a county jail, even though Mr. Turner faced a maximum sentence of 14 years in state prison. She also based her recommendation on what she said was his “sincere remorse and empathy for the victim,” and his lack of a prior criminal record.


    nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/brock-turner-stanford-rape.html?_r=0

    alcohol as a defence/excuse. sickening.
  • FreeFree Posts: 3,562
    edited June 2016

    Jason P said:

    The judge followed the recommendation of the probation officer:

    Monica Lassettre, the probation officer who wrote sentencing recommendations, advised the judge to be lenient partly on the grounds that Mr. Turner was drunk. “This case, when compared to other crimes of similar nature, may be considered less serious due to the defendant’s level of intoxication.”

    She recommended four to six months in a county jail, even though Mr. Turner faced a maximum sentence of 14 years in state prison. She also based her recommendation on what she said was his “sincere remorse and empathy for the victim,” and his lack of a prior criminal record.


    nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/brock-turner-stanford-rape.html?_r=0

    alcohol as a defence/excuse. sickening.
    By a female P.O. no less.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    edited June 2016

    Jason P said:

    The judge followed the recommendation of the probation officer:

    Monica Lassettre, the probation officer who wrote sentencing recommendations, advised the judge to be lenient partly on the grounds that Mr. Turner was drunk. “This case, when compared to other crimes of similar nature, may be considered less serious due to the defendant’s level of intoxication.”

    She recommended four to six months in a county jail, even though Mr. Turner faced a maximum sentence of 14 years in state prison. She also based her recommendation on what she said was his “sincere remorse and empathy for the victim,” and his lack of a prior criminal record.


    nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/brock-turner-stanford-rape.html?_r=0

    alcohol as a defence/excuse. sickening.
    I personally know a guy who was let out of prison super quick for cold-blooded murder for this same reason. He was drunk. After he was released after a short stint in prison, he went on to get drunk and murder another stranger in cold blood in the exact same way. He went to prison for that too.... and is now living free again, happily married. So two unprovoked murders of complete strangers, separate acts (he literally walked into parties, uninvited, and stabbed to death the first person he saw. Twice.), and he got off easy both times because he was drunk (I was friends with him in high school... He was a nice guy with a nice upstanding family. He did have a learning disability but nothing major. You never would have known if you didn't know how he performed in school). So yeah, this "I was drunk" excuse is absolutely sickening, and one that judges apparently believe in.
    (I should mention that this murderer's parents are very, very nice people, and that he has two siblings who turned out great... No horrible asshole of a dad behind this one. Although I'm sure the parents tried their best to defend his actions if they were used as character witnesses or something).
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJ_Soul said:

    Jason P said:

    The judge followed the recommendation of the probation officer:

    Monica Lassettre, the probation officer who wrote sentencing recommendations, advised the judge to be lenient partly on the grounds that Mr. Turner was drunk. “This case, when compared to other crimes of similar nature, may be considered less serious due to the defendant’s level of intoxication.”

    She recommended four to six months in a county jail, even though Mr. Turner faced a maximum sentence of 14 years in state prison. She also based her recommendation on what she said was his “sincere remorse and empathy for the victim,” and his lack of a prior criminal record.


    nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/brock-turner-stanford-rape.html?_r=0

    alcohol as a defence/excuse. sickening.
    I personally know a guy who was let out of prison super quick for cold-blooded murder for this same reason. He was drunk. After he was released after a short stint in prison, he went on to get drunk and murder another stranger in cold blood in the exact same way. He went to prison for that too.... and is now living free again, happily married. So two unprovoked murders of complete strangers, separate acts (he literally walked into parties, uninvited, and stabbed to death the first person he saw. Twice.), and he got off easy both times because he was drunk (I was friends with him in high school... He was a nice guy with a nice upstanding family. He did have a learning disability but nothing major. You never would have known if you didn't know how he performed in school). So yeah, this "I was drunk" excuse is absolutely sickening, and one that judges apparently believe in.
    (I should mention that this murderer's parents are very, very nice people, and that he has two siblings who turned out great... No horrible asshole of a dad behind this one. Although I'm sure the parents tried their best to defend his actions if they were used as character witnesses or something).
    Are you happy with- what I would consider- this weak response to his brutality?

    Weren't you the one telling me that the courts in Canada sentence people very appropriately?
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,242

    PJ_Soul said:

    Jason P said:

    The judge followed the recommendation of the probation officer:

    Monica Lassettre, the probation officer who wrote sentencing recommendations, advised the judge to be lenient partly on the grounds that Mr. Turner was drunk. “This case, when compared to other crimes of similar nature, may be considered less serious due to the defendant’s level of intoxication.”

    She recommended four to six months in a county jail, even though Mr. Turner faced a maximum sentence of 14 years in state prison. She also based her recommendation on what she said was his “sincere remorse and empathy for the victim,” and his lack of a prior criminal record.


    nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/brock-turner-stanford-rape.html?_r=0

    alcohol as a defence/excuse. sickening.
    I personally know a guy who was let out of prison super quick for cold-blooded murder for this same reason. He was drunk. After he was released after a short stint in prison, he went on to get drunk and murder another stranger in cold blood in the exact same way. He went to prison for that too.... and is now living free again, happily married. So two unprovoked murders of complete strangers, separate acts (he literally walked into parties, uninvited, and stabbed to death the first person he saw. Twice.), and he got off easy both times because he was drunk (I was friends with him in high school... He was a nice guy with a nice upstanding family. He did have a learning disability but nothing major. You never would have known if you didn't know how he performed in school). So yeah, this "I was drunk" excuse is absolutely sickening, and one that judges apparently believe in.
    (I should mention that this murderer's parents are very, very nice people, and that he has two siblings who turned out great... No horrible asshole of a dad behind this one. Although I'm sure the parents tried their best to defend his actions if they were used as character witnesses or something).
    Are you happy with- what I would consider- this weak response to his brutality?

    Weren't you the one telling me that the courts in Canada sentence people very appropriately?
    I can't speak for PJ_Soul, but whenever I speak about the courts and their sentencing practices, I speak on the whole. cherry picking can't make an argument. of course there will always be examples on either end of the spectrum.
  • HughFreakingDillonHughFreakingDillon WinnipegPosts: 15,242
    I can see the IDEA behind "well he was drunk", since many people do stupid/out of character things while drunk. However, mentally competent people need to be held accountable for their actions. you CHOSE to get liquored. if you know you are a violent drunk, then don't fucking drink. so to me, the "I was drunk" defence is baseless.
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    edited June 2016

    PJ_Soul said:

    Jason P said:

    The judge followed the recommendation of the probation officer:

    Monica Lassettre, the probation officer who wrote sentencing recommendations, advised the judge to be lenient partly on the grounds that Mr. Turner was drunk. “This case, when compared to other crimes of similar nature, may be considered less serious due to the defendant’s level of intoxication.”

    She recommended four to six months in a county jail, even though Mr. Turner faced a maximum sentence of 14 years in state prison. She also based her recommendation on what she said was his “sincere remorse and empathy for the victim,” and his lack of a prior criminal record.


    nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/brock-turner-stanford-rape.html?_r=0

    alcohol as a defence/excuse. sickening.
    I personally know a guy who was let out of prison super quick for cold-blooded murder for this same reason. He was drunk. After he was released after a short stint in prison, he went on to get drunk and murder another stranger in cold blood in the exact same way. He went to prison for that too.... and is now living free again, happily married. So two unprovoked murders of complete strangers, separate acts (he literally walked into parties, uninvited, and stabbed to death the first person he saw. Twice.), and he got off easy both times because he was drunk (I was friends with him in high school... He was a nice guy with a nice upstanding family. He did have a learning disability but nothing major. You never would have known if you didn't know how he performed in school). So yeah, this "I was drunk" excuse is absolutely sickening, and one that judges apparently believe in.
    (I should mention that this murderer's parents are very, very nice people, and that he has two siblings who turned out great... No horrible asshole of a dad behind this one. Although I'm sure the parents tried their best to defend his actions if they were used as character witnesses or something).
    Are you happy with- what I would consider- this weak response to his brutality?

    Weren't you the one telling me that the courts in Canada sentence people very appropriately?
    No and no. Not sure how you read what I wrote and still had to ask if I am happy with the response. And I absolutely, 100% am NOT of the belief that the Canadian courts sentence people appropriately. On the contrary. Sentences are a fucking JOKE in Canada for the most part when it comes to violent crime and habitual re-offenders. .
    Post edited by PJ_Soul on
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • PJ_Soul said:

    PJ_Soul said:

    Jason P said:

    The judge followed the recommendation of the probation officer:

    Monica Lassettre, the probation officer who wrote sentencing recommendations, advised the judge to be lenient partly on the grounds that Mr. Turner was drunk. “This case, when compared to other crimes of similar nature, may be considered less serious due to the defendant’s level of intoxication.”

    She recommended four to six months in a county jail, even though Mr. Turner faced a maximum sentence of 14 years in state prison. She also based her recommendation on what she said was his “sincere remorse and empathy for the victim,” and his lack of a prior criminal record.


    nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/brock-turner-stanford-rape.html?_r=0

    alcohol as a defence/excuse. sickening.
    I personally know a guy who was let out of prison super quick for cold-blooded murder for this same reason. He was drunk. After he was released after a short stint in prison, he went on to get drunk and murder another stranger in cold blood in the exact same way. He went to prison for that too.... and is now living free again, happily married. So two unprovoked murders of complete strangers, separate acts (he literally walked into parties, uninvited, and stabbed to death the first person he saw. Twice.), and he got off easy both times because he was drunk (I was friends with him in high school... He was a nice guy with a nice upstanding family. He did have a learning disability but nothing major. You never would have known if you didn't know how he performed in school). So yeah, this "I was drunk" excuse is absolutely sickening, and one that judges apparently believe in.
    (I should mention that this murderer's parents are very, very nice people, and that he has two siblings who turned out great... No horrible asshole of a dad behind this one. Although I'm sure the parents tried their best to defend his actions if they were used as character witnesses or something).
    Are you happy with- what I would consider- this weak response to his brutality?

    Weren't you the one telling me that the courts in Canada sentence people very appropriately?
    No and no. Not sure how you read what I wrote and still had to ask if I am happy with the response. And I absolutely, 100% am NOT of the belief that the Canadian courts sentence people appropriately. On the contrary. Sentences are a fucking JOKE in Canada for the most part when it comes to violent crime and habitual re-offenders. .
    Well in that case... you rock.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 14,135
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • Thirty Bills UnpaidThirty Bills Unpaid Posts: 15,140
    mickeyrat said:

    To this statement: His supporters had argued that removing a duly elected judge over disagreement with a controversial but lawful sexual assault sentence would both erode the democratic process and cause judges everywhere to impose lengthier sentences for fear of public backlash.

    Well yah.No shit.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    mickeyrat said:

    To this statement: His supporters had argued that removing a duly elected judge over disagreement with a controversial but lawful sexual assault sentence would both erode the democratic process and cause judges everywhere to impose lengthier sentences for fear of public backlash.

    Well yah.No shit.
    Yeah, that's kind of the whole point, lol.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • SmellymanSmellyman AsiaPosts: 3,348
    edited June 7
    mickeyrat said:

    To this statement: His supporters had argued that removing a duly elected judge over disagreement with a controversial but lawful sexual assault sentence would both erode the democratic process and cause judges everywhere to impose lengthier sentences for fear of public backlash.

    Well yah.No shit.
    Not so much give out lengthier sentences because we want it.  We want fair sentencing.  Judge fucked up and paid the price as he should. 

    There would be back public backlash if a harsh sentence was given to a BS 'crime' too.

    Do your fucking job and you have no need to worry.
  • Thirty Bills UnpaidThirty Bills Unpaid Posts: 15,140
    Smellyman said:
    mickeyrat said:

    To this statement: His supporters had argued that removing a duly elected judge over disagreement with a controversial but lawful sexual assault sentence would both erode the democratic process and cause judges everywhere to impose lengthier sentences for fear of public backlash.

    Well yah.No shit.
    Not so much give out lengthier sentences because we want it.  We want fair sentencing.  Judge fucked up and paid the price as he should. 

    There would be back public backlash if a harsh sentence was given to a BS 'crime' too.

    Do your fucking job and you have no need to worry.
    I'd agree here.
    "My brain's a good brain!"
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,742
    Good voting job, Santa Clara County!
    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





  • mickeyratmickeyrat Posts: 14,135
    _____________________________________SIGNATURE________________________________________________

    Not today Sir, Probably not tomorrow.............................................. bayfront arena st. pete '94
    you're finally here and I'm a mess................................................... nationwide arena columbus '10
    memories like fingerprints are slowly raising.................................... first niagara center buffalo '13
    another man ..... moved by sleight of hand...................................... joe louis arena detroit '14
  • PJ_SoulPJ_Soul Vancouver, BCPosts: 42,727
    Excellent.
    With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy. ~ Desiderata
  • brianluxbrianlux Moving through All Kinds of Terrain.Posts: 24,742
    edited August 10
    Justice done and good! 

    But good grief, six months?  They guy got off easy.  In Nevada, the conviction for rape is life in prison with no chance for appeal until the first  ten years has passed. 
    "Love and only love will break it down"
    -Neil Young
    ***********
    M.I.T.S.





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